5 Minutes With Ford’s Scott Monty – thnxz to @SocialOgilvy


@SocialOgilvy

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This post originally appeared on Social Media Week by Lindsey Taylor Wood.

The following are excerpts from the original post.

This is Social Media Week’s first year partnering with Ford. This SMW NYC, Ford will be making a very special announcement to help kick off the week. You’ll want to be there! Then make sure you swing by our Global HQ to see what we’re doing together. Why? Well, in addition to their success in the automotive industry, they have made quite a name for themselves as a leader in the social media space. We sat down with Ford’s Global Head of Social Media, Scott Monty, to talk about the past, present and future of the company’s social marketing efforts.

Scott, you tweeted this week that “Ford has now posted a pre-tax operating profit for 14 straight quarters” -— in what ways do you think that Ford’s social and digital efforts have contributed to that sustained level of success?

We’re very fortunate to have a company full of talented employees that are making some of the best Ford vehicles that the market is responding to. From excellent fuel efficiency to state of the art technology and truly breathtaking design, the products are leading our strong financial performance. That we get to amplify and share that product superiority on digital and social is just icing on the cake.

But more than just sharing our business results, our advanced efforts on digital and social are consistent with the kind of brand that people want to associate themselves with. We often say that people trust people like them; well, they want brands that reflect their choices and their lifestyles. So they want fuel efficiency and they want a brand that answers them on social networks, they get both in Ford.

Given what you’ve learned from campaigns past, how has your approach to engagement through social media changed?

I can’t really say all that much has changed. Our core principles remain the same: create engaging content, speak like the customer, allow them to speak, and above all, listen. It’s just that the scale on which we do it now is more intense and broad than ever before. And fundamentally, it’s about the human touch: making it clear that there are real people – just like you – who work for Ford or who drive Fords, and that by forging relationships over time, we begin to regain the trust that had been lost.

It’s been over six years since Ford’s many agencies consolidated into the Team Detroit megaforce -—from the brand side, how do you feel that consolidation has improved the workflow for Ford and your social team in particular?

It’s refreshing to have a single shop to be able to coordinate with. The efficiencies we’ve seen have allowed us to think about other ways to direct our spending. And when you also consider that WPP’s Social@Ogilvy is our corporate social agency, there’s another aspect there as well. The ability to have the expertise of PR, marketing and social agencies together under one company means that there are checks and balances that work within the system as well.

Read the full post here.

Social Media Week Social@Ogilvy and Ford Panel:

The Rise of the New Community Manager: A Discussion with Ford and Ogilvy on the New Brand Role

Time: 12:00pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Ogilvy & Mather Theater

Summary: As more and more brands commit to Facebook, Twitter, and other social communities, the stakes of managing millions of fan relationships is rising. Increasingly the job of the community manager is evolving to a more complex and even senior role. Join Social@Ogilvy and hear from those in the trenches and those shaping how brands are managing fans and customer relationships. What are the new skills of the community manager? How will they fit into traditional organizations?

Click here to learn more about attending.

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Humanizing Business & Brands: Your Ambassador Ecosystem

I just returned from a trip to Montreal where I spoke at Webcom about humanizing business and brands. I also got to spend some quality time with folks I’ve admired for a while. While there I enjoyed a wonderful dinner with Trust Agent Julien Smith, and friends followed by a totally rocking Karaoke session with fellow enthusiast and Whuffie star Tara Hunt. Tara has also taken the helm of a very cool new start-up (more on that later). I also got to spend some quality time with fellow speaker Marsha Collier and UX research pioneer (and friend) Jared Spool, a great and smart man.

Back to the idea of humanizing business and brands. Can it be done? Of course it can–that’s what this whole “social thing” is all about. But the catch is understanding and activating your entire ambassador ecosystem and getting your social diplomacy programs working with each other as opposed to against. Here’s how you can look at your ambassadors and the roles they play:


http://darmano.typepad.com/logic_emotion/

Ambassador Ecosystem
I just returned from a trip to Montreal where I spoke at Webcom about humanizing business and brands. I also got to spend some quality time with folks I’ve admired for a while. While there I enjoyed a wonderful dinner with Trust Agent Julien Smith, and friends followed by a totally rocking Karaoke session with fellow enthusiast and Whuffie star Tara Hunt. Tara has also taken the helm of a very cool new start-up (more on that later). I also got to spend some quality time with fellow speaker Marsha Collier and UX research pioneer (and friend) Jared Spool, a great and smart man.

Back to the idea of humanizing business and brands. Can it be done? Of course it can–that’s what this whole “social thing” is all about. But the catch is understanding and activating your entire ambassador ecosystem and getting your social diplomacy programs working with each other as opposed to against. Here’s how you can look at your ambassadors and the roles they play: Leer más “Humanizing Business & Brands: Your Ambassador Ecosystem”

Building your brand (and keeping your job)

By Josh Hyatt, contributor

FORTUNE — Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer. “I’m not somebody who can be accused of using Ford’s brand to benefit my own,” says Monty, the car giant’s first global digital and multimedia communications manager. “If anything, the opposite is true.”

Is somebody’s thinking due for a tune-up? Ford Motor Co. (F, Fortune 500) is, after all, the 107-year-old industrial brainchild of the iconic Henry Ford, birthplace of the Model T, originator of the modern assembly line. Scott Monty? He’s a 40-year-old father of two who coined the word used to describe a gathering organized on Twitter: tweetup. (Okay, so it’s hardly in the OMG category. But it beats “staycation.”)

As a former employee at a B-to-B ad agency and at a social-media strategy firm, Monty spent about three years making a name for himself in social networking by blogging about the convergence of marketing, advertising, and PR. When people at Ford approached him in December 2007 he waved them off, saying he didn’t want to leave Boston. Five months later he made a U-turn. By July, he had moved to Detroit. “I knew that I had the ability to leverage my personal brand on behalf of the company,” he says.

When Monty joined Ford, he brought with him 3,500 Twitter followers; he now counts 41,000, conceding that many of those came with the blue oval logo that now accompanies his tweets. But it has been a two-way street. Last year Ford CEO Alan Mulally signaled as much by joining Monty and taking questions from Twitter. “I brought with me a degree of credibility,” Monty says. “I was somebody who wasn’t going to be looked at as a corporate shill.” And he’s kept his Twitter handle as @scottmonty rather than adding the Ford brand. “I was Scott Monty before I came to Ford, and I’ll be Scott Monty after I leave Ford,” he says.


http://money.cnn.com/2010/07/30/news/economy/building_your_brand.fortune/index.htm

By Josh Hyatt, contributor

FORTUNE — Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer. “I’m not somebody who can be accused of using Ford’s brand to benefit my own,” says Monty, the car giant’s first global digital and multimedia communications manager. “If anything, the opposite is true.”

Is somebody’s thinking due for a tune-up? Ford Motor Co. (F, Fortune 500) is, after all, the 107-year-old industrial brainchild of the iconic Henry Ford, birthplace of the Model T, originator of the modern assembly line. Scott Monty? He’s a 40-year-old father of two who coined the word used to describe a gathering organized on Twitter: tweetup. (Okay, so it’s hardly in the OMG category. But it beats “staycation.”)

As a former employee at a B-to-B ad agency and at a social-media strategy firm, Monty spent about three years making a name for himself in social networking by blogging about the convergence of marketing, advertising, and PR. When people at Ford approached him in December 2007 he waved them off, saying he didn’t want to leave Boston. Five months later he made a U-turn. By July, he had moved to Detroit. “I knew that I had the ability to leverage my personal brand on behalf of the company,” he says.

When Monty joined Ford, he brought with him 3,500 Twitter followers; he now counts 41,000, conceding that many of those came with the blue oval logo that now accompanies his tweets. But it has been a two-way street. Last year Ford CEO Alan Mulally signaled as much by joining Monty and taking questions from Twitter. “I brought with me a degree of credibility,” Monty says. “I was somebody who wasn’t going to be looked at as a corporate shill.” And he’s kept his Twitter handle as @scottmonty rather than adding the Ford brand. “I was Scott Monty before I came to Ford, and I’ll be Scott Monty after I leave Ford,” he says. Leer más “Building your brand (and keeping your job)”

Personal Branding = Principles Not Ego

Josh Hyatt wrote an article about personal branding and working at a large company on money.cnn.com. The piece has caused a lot of controversy because Scott Monty, the social media guy at Ford, was featured in the article. To some, the article appears to paint Scott Monty as an egotist, and because they have so much respect for Scott many people have criticized Josh’s article.

In fact in reading through 5 pages of comments on the article, not one, except a piece of link bait is positive about the article or the writer, rather, overwhelmingly people are positive about Scott.

I must admit when I first read the article I had to read it twice to understand the nuance of what Josh was getting at. I was also slightly put off by a picture of a name badge stating, “Hello my name is Mr. Awesome.”

I reckon the first paragraph about Scott Monty soured the audience to Josh Hyatt the writer. Here’s is the first paragraph.

“Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer. “I’m not somebody who can be accused of using Ford’s brand to benefit my own,” says Monty, the car giant’s first global digital and multimedia communications manager. “If anything, the opposite is true.””

Let’s dissect this paragraph step by step:

“Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer.”

This could mean that Scott cares so much for his ego, that he thinks he is more important than Ford.


My Photo

http://pr.typepad.com/pr_communications/2010/08/personal-branding-principles-not-ego.html

Josh Hyatt wrote an article about personal branding and working at a large company on money.cnn.com. The piece has caused a lot of controversy because Scott Monty, the social media guy at Ford, was featured in the article. To some, the article appears to paint Scott Monty as an egotist, and because they have so much respect for Scott many people have criticized Josh’s article.

In fact in reading through 5 pages of comments on the article, not one, except a piece of link bait is positive about the article or the writer, rather, overwhelmingly people are positive about Scott.

I must admit when I first read the article I had to read it twice to understand the nuance of what Josh was getting at. I was also slightly put off by a picture of a name badge stating, “Hello my name is Mr. Awesome.”

I reckon the first paragraph about Scott Monty soured the audience to Josh Hyatt the writer. Here’s is the first paragraph.

“Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer. “I’m not somebody who can be accused of using Ford’s brand to benefit my own,” says Monty, the car giant’s first global digital and multimedia communications manager. “If anything, the opposite is true.””

Let’s dissect this paragraph step by step:

“Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer.”

This could mean that Scott cares so much for his ego, that he thinks he is more important than Ford. Leer más “Personal Branding = Principles Not Ego”

Personal Branding = Principles Not Ego

Josh Hyatt wrote an article about personal branding and working at a large company on money.cnn.com. The piece has caused a lot of controversy because Scott Monty, the social media guy at Ford, was featured in the article. To some, the article appears to paint Scott Monty as an egotist, and because they have so much respect for Scott many people have criticized Josh’s article.

In fact in reading through 5 pages of comments on the article, not one, except a piece of link bait is positive about the article or the writer, rather, overwhelmingly people are positive about Scott.

I must admit when I first read the article I had to read it twice to understand the nuance of what Josh was getting at. I was also slightly put off by a picture of a name badge stating, “Hello my name is Mr. Awesome.”


Josh Hyatt wrote an article about personal branding and working at a large company on money.cnn.com. The piece has caused a lot of controversy because Scott Monty, the social media guy at Ford, was featured in the article. To some, the article appears to paint Scott Monty as an egotist, and because they have so much respect for Scott many people have criticized Josh’s article.

In fact in reading through 5 pages of comments on the article, not one, except a piece of link bait is positive about the article or the writer, rather, overwhelmingly people are positive about Scott.

I must admit when I first read the article I had to read it twice to understand the nuance of what Josh was getting at. I was also slightly put off by a picture of a name badge stating, “Hello my name is Mr. Awesome.” Leer más “Personal Branding = Principles Not Ego”

6 retos de la gestión de una marca en las webs sociales

Las compañías y las firmas de relaciones públicas intentan gestionar sus marcas utilizando las redes sociales, pero hay tantas oportunidades de conseguir éxito como escollos. Para que los profesionales del colectivo entendieran estos retos, Mashable ha consultado a seis profesionales de las redes sociales con experiencia en PR, marcas y marketing que han conseguido ganarse el respeto en sus trabajos.


Las compañías y las firmas de relaciones públicas intentan gestionar sus marcas utilizando las redes sociales, pero hay tantas oportunidades de conseguir éxito como escollos. Para que los profesionales del colectivo entendieran estos retos, Mashable ha consultado a seis profesionales de las redes sociales con experiencia en PR, marcas y marketing que han conseguido ganarse el respeto en sus trabajos.

1. Drew OLanoff: Tu mayor reto es la transparencia
Drew Olanoff es un rey entre los community managers, que actualmente trabaja en textPlus, y es un joven brillante sobretodo a la hora de diseccionar cómo funcionan los mecanismos de las redes sociales en el entorno de los negocios en el mundo real.

El consejo de Olanoff resalta la importancia de “ser todo para todos”. Aconseja no aguantar o escatimar en los esfuerzos de marca o de marketing. Además, internamente hay que dejar a los empleados saber cuál será el mensaje externo que se va a lanzar.

A la hora de comunicar al mundo exterior, para Olanoff hay que “estar arriba. Si tu compañía falla, tienes que ser el primero en enterarse. Si teienes éxito, tienes que comentarlo para que la captar la atención de la gente.” Esto requiere una atención íntegra a la hora de comunicar en una web social de una forma honesta y diligente. “Es un trabajo de 24 horas, los 7 días de la semana”.

2. Scott Monty: Tu mayor reto es la nivelación
Scott Monty es jefe de social media en Ford. En cuanto a los retos que tiene que superar una marca en las webs sociales “uno de los mayores es el asunto de la nivelación. Si trabajas en una marca de éxito, siempre habrá más clientes que empleados, lo que significa que habrá más conversaciones sobre tu marca que aquellas en las que podrás intervenir”.

Monty dice que para poder equilibrar las conversaciones en los social media y la marca hace falta priorizar: “ejercer un juicio para determinar qué discusiones merecen nuestro tiempo. Puede ser involucrarse con un influencer, tratar la queja de un consumidor o dar acceso a eventos a los fans, información o cualquier otra oportunidad para profundizar en la relación”.

3. Laura Fitton: Tu mayor reto es tu cinturón de herramientas
Laura Fitton, inteligente, hábil y gran conocedora del software de las aplicaciones que convierten las redes sociales en algo fácil y, a la vez, robusto.

Para ella, el mayor reto al que hay que enfrentarse de cara a las redes sociales es “imaginarse qué herramientas debes usar de los miles que hay disponibles”. La fundadora de oneforty, una tienda de aplicaciones para Twitter, conoce mejor que nadie cuántas herramientas existen y cuánto pueden variar en calidad. “Hace falta tiempo y esfuerzo para encontrar las herramientas que se adapten a las necesidades de tu negocio, el estilo de trabajo de tu equipo, tus datos, el backup y las exigencias de tu empresa. Las herramientas adecuadas ahorran mucho tiempo, dinero y molestias”.

4. Peter Shankman: Tu mayor reto son los ingresos
Peter Shankman es una gran recurso para sus compañeros de relaciones públicas, periodistas y expertos que buscan fuentes.

A los responsables de las marcas, Shankman recomienda que estén siempre pendientes del resultado final. El mayor reto ha dicho que “es convencer a la gente que la gestión no es para conseguir algo divertido, sino para conseguir ingresos. Si lo que haces no incrementa los ingresos de alguna manera, a los que mandan no les va a importar nada lo cool que sea”.

5. Ayelet Noff: Tu mayor reto son las relaciones
Ayelet Noff recuerda que cada acción no tiene por qué derivar en un montón de marcas que utilizan los social media. “Las marcas tienen que hacer un cambio mental, en lugar de aprovechar cada oportunidad de vender en su mercado, buscar formas de comprometerse con los consumidores. Si un cliente llega hasta ti, en lugar de lanzarte a él, trata de hablarle y escuchar lo que tiene que decir, hacer un esfuerzo en desarrollar una relación comunicativa. Este tipo de relaciones son, a la larga, mucho más valiosas que cualquier venta puntual”.

6. Brian Solis: Tu mayor reto es el futuro
Brian Solis es uno de los grandes nombres de los nuevos medios de comunicación.

Cuando se le pregunta por las bendiciones y maldiciones que tienen los social media sobre los responsables de marca, Solis dio el siguiente consejo: “el mayo reto hoy y mañana es la cultura de cambio que exige, no sólo a la hora de involucrarse en las redes sociales, sino de convertirse en una autoridad en cada red de relevancia. Para hacerlo, los empresarios requieren una conversación de abajo a arriba en el flujo de trabajo que dirija y responda, además de una jerarquía que transforme los nuevos productos y servicios”. Los empresarios tienen que escuchar a sus comunidades y aceptar nuevas ideas con una estructura administrativa abierta a nuevas ideas.

Fuente:
http://www.marketingdirecto.com/actualidad/social-media-marketing/6-retos-de-la-gestion-de-una-marca-en-las-webs-sociales/

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eBook – Social Media Marketing GPS: A New Media Roadmap For Creating A Social Media Strategy (Excelente material, muy recomendable!)

Sometimes you just have to color outside the lines. Sometimes you stumble. Sometimes you soar. Sometimes people wrapped in the status quo just don’t get your ideas. Sometimes you find people who believe in your vision.

My story. Last summer I invited social media marketing pros to explore with me a new book genre. I wondered if a real business book could be written using Twitter as the major content platform and distribution channel.

* I am excited to launch Social Media Marketing GPS, as free eBook, in celebration of Diva Marketing’s 6th blog birthday! My mom’s birthday! and Shel Israel, who wrote the Forward and is recovering from heart surgery! Social Media Marketing GPS is the first business book based on Twitter interviews.

What is it about? Social Media Marketing GPS is based on Twitter interviews with 40 of the smartest people working in social media. The book begins with an explanation of why include social media and moves on to cover ethics, tactics, research, metric, branding, sponsored conversations, blogger relations and even a few case studies. Additional content wraps around each of the 12 chapters creating a process for you to use to develop your social media marketing plan.


CoverSometimes you just have to color outside the lines. Sometimes you stumble. Sometimes you soar. Sometimes people wrapped in the status quo just don’t get your ideas. Sometimes you find people who believe in your vision.

My story. Last summer I invited social media marketing pros to explore with me a new book genre. I wondered if a real business book could be written using Twitter as the major content platform and distribution channel.

  • I am excited to launch Social Media Marketing GPS, as free eBook, in celebration of Diva Marketing’s 6th blog birthday! My mom’s birthday! and Shel Israel, who wrote the Forward and is recovering from heart surgery! Social Media Marketing GPS is the first business book based on Twitter interviews.

What is it about? Social Media Marketing GPS is based on Twitter interviews with 40 of the smartest people working in social media. The book begins with an explanation of why include social media and moves on to cover ethics, tactics, research, metric, branding, sponsored conversations, blogger relations and even a few case studies. Additional content wraps around each of the 12 chapters creating a process for you to use to develop your social media marketing plan. Leer más “eBook – Social Media Marketing GPS: A New Media Roadmap For Creating A Social Media Strategy (Excelente material, muy recomendable!)”