24 Most Creative Examples of Digital Artwork

Posted by WDCore Editorial

Creativity has no limit. It all depends upon your level of critical thinking and how far can you think and then turn that imaginative idea into reality. Digital art work is the perfect place for creative minds. It is the field where you can explore your creativity beyond any limit.
In this post we have assembled some of most creative digital artworks for your inspiration; we hope that you will like this collection. After going through this post, you will realize that it has helped you in getting over your creative burnout and let you get your enthusiasm and creativity back.

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Creativity has no limit. It all depends upon your level of critical thinking and how far can you think and then turn that imaginative idea into reality. Digital art work is the perfect place for creative minds. It is the field where you can explore your creativity beyond any limit.
In this post we have assembled some of most creative digital artworks for your inspiration; we hope that you will like this collection. After going through this post, you will realize that it has helped you in getting over your creative burnout and let you get your enthusiasm and creativity back.

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Conflicts, storytelling and design thinking

Por jabaldaia

Observing conflicts to leverage new ideas on design thinking

It seems trivial to create something from a conflict, but if the aim is to create something new and that solves a problem no longer seems so banal.

The same conflict can be observed by different people with different results according to the environments or contexts.

We Observe conflicts in meeting rooms to set company strategy or in the operating room of a hospital by the divergence of views regarding the best procedure or in the next room, in the same hospital for a diagnosis to a child.

GE can help us to think a little about the use of observation of the conflict to find solutions to various problems. But GE is not alone, is also with the assistance of design thinking.

For GE, the design process begins not from the standpoint of engineering, but gaining a deep understanding of people who will interact with the equipment. They do not leave from ideas they begin from unmet needs.


Por jabaldaia

Observing conflicts to leverage new ideas on design thinking

It seems trivial to create something from a conflict, but if the aim is to create something new and that solves a problem no longer seems so banal.

The same conflict can be observed by different people with different results according to the environments or contexts.

We Observe conflicts in meeting rooms to set company strategy or in the operating room of a hospital by the divergence of views regarding the best procedure or in the next room, in the same hospital for a diagnosis to a child.

GE can help us to think a little about the use of observation of the conflict to find solutions to various problems. But GE is not alone, is also with the assistance of design thinking.

For GE, the design process begins not from the standpoint of engineering, but gaining a deep understanding of people who will interact with the equipment. They do not leave from ideas they begin from unmet needs. Leer más “Conflicts, storytelling and design thinking”

Skeptics vs Cynics: Problem-Solving with a Bias Towards Resolution :: Tips :: The 99 Percent


I’ve written before about the valuable role that skeptics play in a creative team. Although these poo-poo’ers that love to find fault with new ideas can be annoying, they’re always helpful – and essential to making ideas happen. Without them, we can get intoxicated on idea generation and fail to focus, refine our ideas, and follow through enough to succeed. So skeptics are good.However, skeptical does not mean cynical. I have observed in some teams a dangerous dynamic where skeptics turn cynical and negative. Rather than try to fix problems, they obsess over what is broken. Not only does this further obstruct finding an expedient resolution, it also sucks energy out of the team.

Here’s the difference:

The skeptic: “I’m concerned about the issue, and I think we need to revisit X and Y. Perhaps we want to try Z instead? Or maybe there is a way we can tweak Y to work?”

The cynic: “We did not discuss the issue enough. X and Y are both wrong. We’re not approaching this in the right way.”

Notice how both people disagree, but the skeptic is pushing the search for a solution while the cynic is simply focused on what is wrong.

Rather than try to fix problems, they obsess over what is broken.

In a creative environment that moves a mile a minute, everyone should act with a bias towards resolution. This means discussing the problem with the intention of solving it rather than embellishing it. As a leader of a creative team, you should expect possible solutions from everyone, even those that are pessimistic. The possible solutions don’t need to be the right solutions, and they don’t need to be fully constructed.

The process of discussing a problem in the language of resolution can help a team maintain enough energy to debate the options. Like throwing spaghetti on a wall, the more solutions proposed, the more likely one sticks. If you’re the team skeptic, you can rest assured knowing that debating the merits of various solutions will shed more light on the problem.

Many leaders insist that adversity only serves to strengthen a team. Problems help us better understand our product and further refine the way we work. Unfortunately, problems also bring out the worst in people. Tempers, insecurities, and fears are most likely to flare up during conflict. Nevertheless, the best teams are able to weather the storm by keeping their eyes on the prize – the prospect of resolution.


This post was written by Behance Founder & CEO Scott Belsky, whose new book, Making Ideas Happen, chronicles the methods of exceptionally productive creative people and teams. Learn more about MIH.

http://the99percent.com/tips/6412/skeptics-vs-cynics-problem-solving-with-a-bias-towards-resolution

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