How not to design! The Biggest mistakes that designers make | creativebloq.com


All designers make mistakes. Craig Minchington examines the most common howlers, and how to avoid them.

Although we don’t like to admit it later on in our careers, when we start making our way as designers, we make a lot of mistakes. Once you’re working in a creative agency you quickly learn that there are a lot of things you should not do. Here I’ve compiled a list of 10 common design mistakes for you to be aware of. Although I’ve committed most of these crimes myself, I have learned from them and hopefully they can help you too…

01. Not understanding the brief

Get as much detail about what the clients wants and needs, as early on as possible

Without a clear idea of what the client wants you can end up making matters complicated for yourself. A lot of time can be wasted procrastinating, or working up design ideas that may not be relevant to the client’s needs. Instead, you need to read and understand the brief carefully from the start, make notes, brainstorm and try to keep in contact with the client to ensure that what you are working up is heading in the right direction.

02. Not saving files correctly

In general, save your designs as CMYK for print, RGB for web

Knowing how to set up your files correctly from the start is vitally important. There are many things to consider depending on the output of the work.

Print work is generally set up as CMYK and at 300dpi, whereas work for the web should be RGB at 72dpi. Remember to consider bleed, trim and safety areas. Before sending to print, think about your file formats, outlining fonts and colour profiles.

This may all seem like a lot to take in but learning these processes will save you time in the long run, ensuring your work is reproduced correctly and keeping the client happy.    >>>>>    Leer más “How not to design! The Biggest mistakes that designers make | creativebloq.com”

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This Lamp is Controlled by an Android Phone

The french developer of the unnamed project wrote this about the Android controlled lamp of awesome (this is the translation):

The brightness is changed by a vertical scrolling, the saturation by a horizontal scrolling and color varies with the orientation of the phone. The phone used in the video is a HTC Wildfire S Android 2.3.3. The application works with WiFi or mobile network (provided that the lamp is accessible from a public IP address)

The orientation of the phone is detected by the built-in compass (magnetic field sensor 3-axis) parameters hue, saturation and brightness are converted to RGB and then sent via a TCP connection to the Fox board that controls the lamp.


http://thenextweb.com

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The smartphone is now becoming the hub for everything important in our lives. Social connections, payment systems, and banking are all controlled by our phone. Heck, you can even control your thermostat with an iPhone.

While turning your lights on and off with a computer or app might not be a new idea, one guy made something completely awesome and unique using Android. By swiping around on the app, the lamp responds to it. Also, the orientation of your phone dictates the lighting as well. Leer más “This Lamp is Controlled by an Android Phone”

40+ Useful Online Generators For Web Designers

By Cameron Chapman

Generators can be a great way to save time in your web design projects. High-quality generators can create graphics or code or even layouts in a matter of seconds or minutes, things that might take an hour or more if done by hand. Below are some useful generators to help you speed up your web design process. There’s everything from color scheme tools to complete layout generators included. If you know of other useful generators out there, please share in the comments!

Color Schemes

A good color scheme is the cornerstone of a good website design. Coming up with unique and appropriate color schemes isn’t always easy. That’s where these color scheme generators come in handy.


Full article
http://www.noupe.com/tools/40-useful-online-generators.html

By Cameron Chapman

Generators can be a great way to save time in your web design projects. High-quality generators can create graphics or code or even layouts in a matter of seconds or minutes, things that might take an hour or more if done by hand. Below are some useful generators to help you speed up your web design process. There’s everything from color scheme tools to complete layout generators included. If you know of other useful generators out there, please share in the comments!

Color Schemes

A good color scheme is the cornerstone of a good website design. Coming up with unique and appropriate color schemes isn’t always easy. That’s where these color scheme generators come in handy. Leer más “40+ Useful Online Generators For Web Designers”

How to Calibrate Color for the Web


a photo with varying degrees of color adjustment When is orange more like red? Web designers, even picky ones, sometimes ignore color shift across monitors.

How is a web designer to manage color when the screens of their users could be any size or color or could be viewed under any lighting conditions?

Unlike fixing HTML errors, which affect browsers as the page is loaded, getting accurate color is part of the designer’s work process.

Maintaining colors across projects is possible once the problems are understood. Read on for the challenges—and solutions—to getting consistent color on the web.

Can you spot the difference between the photos below?

two slightly different photos

One of the images is slightly more blue than the other. This “color shift,” or overall tint of a particular hue, might go unnoticed by the casual observer. After all, a slight change in hue doesn’t make this any less of a flower or detract from the dewdrop’s detail. It’s a cumulative change.

Over time, maximum-quality JPEG images and 256-color PNG icons eat up precious bandwidth. Complexity in HTML increases the browser’s workload with each page load. Unlike these problems, which add up as visitors browse the website, color management is a problem with the design process. Images created on an uncalibrated monitor become inconsistent over time.

Color shift could go by another name: inattentiveness.

When can we say that a graphic’s color matches the page close enough? At what point is a photo’s color too inaccurate? What details don’t matter to the project as a whole? Everyone may have different answers, but no one who takes digital images seriously can ignore color calibration.

The print industry has struggled with getting accurate color for decades. Ensuring that the exact same colors appear at all stages of production—including in various monitors, office printers and high-end presses—has spawned its own industry of calibration devices, software solutions and even ISO standards.

The web design community generally doesn’t worry about press checks. But maybe it should.

The Web Has Had Color Issues Since It’s Had Color

In the 1990s, getting accurate color on the web meant using a palette of 216 “web-safe” colors. These hues and shades were (mostly) guaranteed not to dither when displayed on monitors that could not handle more than 8-bit color.

illustration of a dithered image

Above is a gradient with and without dithering. Today, the vast majority of computers can show 24-bit color or better (according to these browser display statistics and Google Analytics tracking of websites, including Webdesigner Depot). That is, each pixel can show one of millions of colors, making calibration both complicated and more critical.

The web has long relied on hexidecimal codes, like #F35C23, to define colors. These six-character strings can display a wide variety of hues and values with great precision. An image that has #F35C23 and a CSS background in #F35C23 will match perfectly.

The problem is that the code defines a combination of red, green and blue but does not always result in consistent color. Display screens account for the difference.

White Is White, Except When It Isn’t

Many factors affect color accuracy when creating and editing digital images. As with print, color on the web depends on the environment in which the image is created. Unlike print, web-based images can change every time they’re displayed because the monitors of users will vary, and no press check can catch problems that crop up.

Although many modern web browsers can display CMYK images, most images for the web are based on the additive RGB color model. This model applies a mixture of red, green and blue to each pixel.

But not all monitors are built the same, and so a particular shade of orange could be inconsistent across different screens. Here are some of the causes of color change:

  • Slight changes between manufacturers and models account for slight inaccuracies in shade and hue.
  • Many screens (especially CRT monitors) change color over the years and even as they warm up over the course of a day.
  • Until recently, Mac OS X and Windows used two different “gammas,” which meant that images on Macs appeared brighter than ones on PC. Mac OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard) uses the more common gamma of 2.2, which is the same as Windows and many televisions and camcorders.
  • People browse the web from many different locations and in many different lighting conditions. The effect of overhead lights and the amount and color of natural light all affect the appearance of color on the screen.

simulated color shift across different displays

Above, different calibration shows that “white” is often an assumed color:

  1. The original image, shot under fluorescent light with a point-and-shoot camera.
  2. Approximate color shift on a Mac before Snow Leopard.
  3. Approximate color shift on an aging CRT monitor.
  4. Close to true color, as seen on the laptop on which the photo was processed. Leer más “How to Calibrate Color for the Web”