Locos por los Códigos QR: 30 usos y aplicaciones que no te dejarán indiferente

Como hemos podido comprobar en multitud de ocasiones, los Códigos QR, se han convertido en toda una revolución de la tecnología móvil al servicio de la mercadotecnia. Así lo recogimos en nuestroespecial sobre Códigos QR donde descubrimos algunos ejemplos creativos y usos aplicados de este tipo de códigos, así como los mejores consejos para utilizarlos en nuestro negocio.


http://www.puromarketing.com

Como hemos podido comprobar en multitud de ocasiones, los Códigos QR, se han convertido en toda una revolución de la tecnología móvil al servicio de la mercadotecnia. Así lo recogimos en nuestroespecial sobre Códigos QR donde descubrimos algunos ejemplos creativos y usos aplicados de este tipo de códigos, así como los mejores consejos para utilizarlos en nuestro negocio.

Sin embargo, en muchos países, los códigos QR han desatado una auténtica locura. Toda una tendencia convertida en más que una moda o herramienta de marketing, que ha originado y dado pie a sorprendentes ejemplos e inusuales propuestas y aplicaciones inspiradas en este tipo de códigos.  Como prueba de ello, hemos recogido una selección de algunos de estos ejemplos que sin duda no te dejarán indiferente. Así son los ‘locos por los Códigos QR!’

Galería

Review of The Web Designer’s Idea Book II

I have to admit, the idea of a book that aims to inspire web designers with example websites seemed a little repetitive to me when I first thought about it.

After all, there are dozens of excellent galleries out there online that we can access for free, that are updated on a daily or at least weekly basis.

Could a book compete with that? Or would it just be filled with the same sites we’ve all seen in every gallery and design roundup out there.

As someone who studies design galleries and roundups on an almost daily basis, I was pleasantly surprised to see that the majority of the designs included in The Web Designer’s Idea Book, Volume 2, by Patrick McNeil (who writes a monthly column for .net magazine and runs Design Meltdown), were not ones I remember seeing previously.

In fact, most of the designs in the book are fresh and new, and haven’t made the usual rounds of galleries and showcases.

Now, of course, just because something is new doesn’t mean it’s going to be useful. It takes a combination of new and well-organized to stand out. [Más…]

And The Web Designer’s Idea Book really comes through in that respect, too. It takes the best methods of organizing content from a variety of online galleries and combines them to create what could be the most well-thought-out source of design inspiration available.


I have to admit, the idea of a book that aims to inspire web designers with example websites seemed a little repetitive to me when I first thought about it.

After all, there are dozens of excellent galleries out there online that we can access for free, that are updated on a daily or at least weekly basis.

Could a book compete with that? Or would it just be filled with the same sites we’ve all seen in every gallery and design roundup out there.

As someone who studies design galleries and roundups on an almost daily basis, I was pleasantly surprised to see that the majority of the designs included in The Web Designer’s Idea Book, Volume 2, by Patrick McNeil (who writes a monthly column for .net magazine and runs Design Meltdown), were not ones I remember seeing previously.

In fact, most of the designs in the book are fresh and new, and haven’t made the usual rounds of galleries and showcases.

Now, of course, just because something is new doesn’t mean it’s going to be useful. It takes a combination of new and well-organized to stand out. Leer más “Review of The Web Designer’s Idea Book II”

Why the Real-Estate Slump Could be Killing Small Business Hiring

1) A disproportionate amount of the products and services small businesses sell are tied to home sales. Independent realtors, small contruction contractors, interior decorators, decor boutiques…they all take the hit when home sales slow.

2) Many entrepreneurs have historically used their own home as their business-funding piggybank. With many homes now devoid of equity, there’s less cash cushion with which to take a risk and put on a new hire.

3) Banks’ lending was choked off in part because of their mortgage-loan problems. So just when the home-equity piggybank ran dry, banks also balked at loans.

I’ve interviewed Shane before and found him a very knowledgeable source. His theory makes solid sense, and reveals how home sales ripple through the broader U.S. economy.

What do you think? Is real estate the man behind the curtain in the small-business hiring slump? Leave a comment and let us know if your own home-equity situation has impacted your hiring decisions.


A lot of theories have been circulated for why small businesses aren’t hiring — the bank lending crunch, emotional nervousness about the economy, high taxes, low sales. This week, noted Case Western Reserve University professor Scott Shane weighed in with his theory: It’s all about the residential real-estate collapse. Leer más “Why the Real-Estate Slump Could be Killing Small Business Hiring”

Fight The System: Battling Bureaucracy

With the odds stacked so high against them, I am surprised in-house Web teams get anything done at all. Their success depends as much on their ability to navigate politics and bureaucracy as it does on their skills as designers and developers.

But do not despair. I can tell you from the over-subscription to workshops I have run on the subject that you are not alone. This is a universal problem and one that can be overcome, as I will outline in this post.

Our Web design agency specializes in complex projects. During my time there, I have developed certain techniques that will hopefully help others keep their Web projects moving.


If you work as part of an in-house Web team, you have my sympathy. If that in-house team is within a large organization, then doubly so. Being part of an in-house Web team sucks. Trust me, I know. I worked at IBM for three years and now spend most of my days working alongside battle-weary internal teams.

SM1-20100805-170827 in Fight The System: Battling Bureaucracy
Web designer trying to hang himself.

It’s hardly surprising that most in-house teams are worn down and depressed. They face almost insurmountable challenges:

  • Departmental feuds
    Too often, a website becomes a battleground for pre-existing departmental conflicts. Political power plays can manifest themselves in fights over home page real estate or conflicts over website ownership. After all, is the website an IT function or a marketing tool?
  • Uninformed decision-makers
    Rarely does an internal Web team have the authority to make final decisions on a website. Instead decision-making happens higher up in the organization. Unfortunately, although these individuals have more authority, they do not have greater knowledge of the Web. Decision-making is often based more on personal opinion than the needs of users or business objectives.
  • Committees
    Committees are the curse of larger organizations. The bigger the organization, the more the number of people who want their say, and that leads to committees. Unfortunately, committees inevitably lead to compromise and design-on-the-fly. Both are the kiss of death to any Web project.
  • An inward perspective
    Becoming institutionalized is very easy in a large organization. Eventually you speak an internal language and think in terms of organizational structure. This proves problematic when communicating to end users. Not only do most large organizations have their own internal perspective of the world, some individuals even think departmentally, further aggravating departmental conflict.
  • Endless scope creep
    When an in-house Web team is constantly available, calling on their help is easy. This is both a benefit and a curse. The truth is that many Web teams are taken for granted, and websites that should never exist are built and launched because there are no constraints. Worse still, good projects can be drowned as “internal clients” keep demanding additional functionality that the Web team cannot block.
  • Problem people
    The bigger the organization, the higher the chance they will hire a jerk. If you work for a large organization, I can pretty much guarantee you have someone in mind as you read this. These people can really hinder the work of the Web team and prevent a website from reaching its full potential.
  • Glacially slow progress
    With endless red tape and painful committees, getting stuff done in a large institution can be nearly impossible. It is not unusual for projects to grind to a halt entirely because they become dependant on other systems or projects yet to be implemented. I have even seen something as simple as the roll-out of a content management system take years to implement. Leer más “Fight The System: Battling Bureaucracy”

Review: The Art of Barter

Every Sunday, The Simple Dollar reviews a personal finance book or other book of interest.

art of barterA while back, I wrote a post called “Askers, Guessers, and Personal Finance” that proposed that bartering and negotiation are much easier for some people than for others, depending on their personality and the culture in which they were raised. I’m very much in the “guesser” camp, which means that I often have difficulty negotiating with others, asking for things, and bartering.

After that realization, I’ve spent some significant time focusing on improving my willingness to ask for and trade for things, and thus when I spotted The Art of Barter by Karen Hoffman and Shera Dalin on the shelf at my local library, I snatched it right up.

The book basically makes the case for bartering – in other words, offering one good or service in direct exchange for another good or service without cash in the middle – and discusses how exactly to go about it in many different situations. I myself have found bartering to be very useful and often do it with people I know – but will this book offer enough advice for me to attempt it in other situations?


Written by Trent

Every Sunday, The Simple Dollar reviews a personal finance book or other book of interest.

A while back, I wrote a post called “Askers, Guessers, and Personal Finance” that proposed that bartering and negotiation are much easier for some people than for others, depending on their personality and the culture in which they were raised. I’m very much in the “guesser” camp, which means that I often have difficulty negotiating with others, asking for things, and bartering.

After that realization, I’ve spent some significant time focusing on improving my willingness to ask for and trade for things, and thus when I spotted The Art of Barter by Karen Hoffman and Shera Dalin on the shelf at my local library, I snatched it right up.

The book basically makes the case for bartering – in other words, offering one good or service in direct exchange for another good or service without cash in the middle – and discusses how exactly to go about it in many different situations. I myself have found bartering to be very useful and often do it with people I know – but will this book offer enough advice for me to attempt it in other situations? Leer más “Review: The Art of Barter”

Manhattan Luxury Condos Embrace FHA in ‘Game Changer’

By Oshrat Carmiel

(Updates with comment from New York University professor in 30th paragraph, 1 Rector Park approval in 43rd.)

Aug. 13 (Bloomberg) — Whitney Gollinger, marketing chief for a Manhattan condo building with an outdoor movie theater and panoramic city views, is highlighting a different amenity to spur sales: the financial backing of the federal government.

The Federal Housing Administration agreed in March to insure mortgages for apartments at the 98-unit Gramercy Park development, known as Tempo. That enables buyers to make a down payment of as little as 3.5 percent in a building where apartments range from $820,000 to $3 million.

“It’s a government seal of approval,” said Gollinger, a director at the Developments Group of New York-based brokerage Prudential Douglas Elliman Real Estate. “We need as many sales tools as we can have these days, and it’s one more tool.”

The FHA, created in 1934 to make homeownership attainable for low- to moderate-income Americans, is now providing a lifeline to new Manhattan luxury condominiums after sales stalled. Buildings featuring pet spas, concierges and rooftop lounges are applying for agency backing to unlock bank financing for purchasers. The FHA guarantees that if a homebuyer defaults on his mortgage, the agency will pay it.


Logo of the Federal Housing Administration.
Image via Wikipedia
By Oshrat Carmiel(Updates with comment from New York University professor in 30th paragraph, 1 Rector Park approval in 43rd.)

Aug. 13 (Bloomberg) — Whitney Gollinger, marketing chief for a Manhattan condo building with an outdoor movie theater and panoramic city views, is highlighting a different amenity to spur sales: the financial backing of the federal government.

The Federal Housing Administration agreed in March to insure mortgages for apartments at the 98-unit Gramercy Park development, known as Tempo. That enables buyers to make a down payment of as little as 3.5 percent in a building where apartments range from $820,000 to $3 million.

“It’s a government seal of approval,” said Gollinger, a director at the Developments Group of New York-based brokerage Prudential Douglas Elliman Real Estate. “We need as many sales tools as we can have these days, and it’s one more tool.”

The FHA, created in 1934 to make homeownership attainable for low- to moderate-income Americans, is now providing a lifeline to new Manhattan luxury condominiums after sales stalled. Buildings featuring pet spas, concierges and rooftop lounges are applying for agency backing to unlock bank financing for purchasers. The FHA guarantees that if a homebuyer defaults on his mortgage, the agency will pay it. Leer más “Manhattan Luxury Condos Embrace FHA in ‘Game Changer’”

Are Your Marketing Materials Consistent?

So you started your business with a clear mission, vision and values. You know your objectives, and you’re excited to implement your marketing strategies.

You know you need to build your communications based on your value propositions, so you look at some of the most commonly used marketing materials and decide which ones you’ll create for your company such as brochures, newsletters, product sheets, and business cards.

With a copywriter and a great graphic designer, it should be easy right? So why do we still see some inconsistent marketing messages in some marketing materials?

The importance of consistent look and feel

A few weeks ago I was at a mall with a friend and we were handed out these brochures and flyers by a real estate developer. At first look they were pretty nice, but after reading through the materials I spotted several grammatical errors and inconsistencies in the contact information. At home I checked their site to look at photos of the residential housing units they’ve developed and saw the same inconsistencies, this time including themes and colors.

As a marketer and writer, I’ve developed an eye for these things, and this tells me that as business owners, marketers and salespersons need to be reminded of the importance of the consistent look and feel of all marketing materials. These materials are the ‘face’ of the company, so it’s important that they deliver the right, consistent messages in order to be attractive and effective. Some guidelines:


So you started your business with a clear mission, vision and values. You know your objectives, and you’re excited to implement your marketing strategies.

You know you need to build your communications based on your value propositions, so you look at some of the most commonly used marketing materials and decide which ones you’ll create for your company such as brochures, newsletters, product sheets, and business cards.

With a copywriter and a great graphic designer, it should be easy right? So why do we still see some inconsistent marketing messages in some marketing materials?

The importance of consistent look and feel

A few weeks ago I was at a mall with a friend and we were handed out these brochures and flyers by a real estate developer. At first look they were pretty nice, but after reading through the materials I spotted several grammatical errors and inconsistencies in the contact information. At home I checked their site to look at photos of the residential housing units they’ve developed and saw the same inconsistencies, this time including themes and colors.

As a marketer and writer, I’ve developed an eye for these things, and this tells me that as business owners, marketers and salespersons need to be reminded of the importance of the consistent look and feel of all marketing materials. These materials are the ‘face’ of the company, so it’s important that they deliver the right, consistent messages in order to be attractive and effective. Some guidelines: Leer más “Are Your Marketing Materials Consistent?”

What the F**K is Social Media [SLIDESHARE]


by jeremywaite

If you’ve not seen this before – I hope it informs, educates and inspires you in the same way that it made me look at a few more things differently…. (Thanks Jacquelyn & Marta)

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Is The Facebook LIKE Button Totally Worthless?

Most of the time, when I’m on another blog, I see nobody has used the LIKE button. When I asked people if they use it, the answer is a resounding “no”.

At the same time, it seems it slows down the load-time on some sites. For me, it doesn’t seem to do that because it is in an IFRAME.


Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase

The LIKE button was one of the big announcements out of the Facebook F8 conference. A way to expand into the rest of the web. Bloggers go crazy!

So, like a good little blogger, I installed it. Sit back and wait for the results. And….

Crickets. Leer más “Is The Facebook LIKE Button Totally Worthless?”

Celebrities en ropa interior, para ¿subir? la autoestima femenina


Cosmopolitan se ha propuesto mejorar la autoestima de todas sus lectoras con Body Love, una nueva sección donde las mujeres conocerán técnicas para “quererse y sentirse realmente única”, explica la publicación en un comunicado.

Varias celebrities se han unido a esta iniciativa, y en el número de abril de Cosmopolitan cuentan sus experiencias personales para desmitificar la apariencia física como sinónimo de éxito, además de posar en ropa interior para mostrar su cuerpo “con honestidad”.
Miriam Giovanelli, Carla Nieto, Cecilia Freire, Itziar Miranda, Cristina Serrato, Tania Llasera, Angy, Andrea Dueso y Vinila Von Bismark, conforman el elenco de mujeres que abanderan el proyecto Body Love, con Pilar Rubio a la cabeza, quien ha afirmado a la publicación en una entrevista que el secreto de su éxito “va mucho mas allá de la apariencia física”.

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http://www.brandlife.es/

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How to be a billionaire


SHAUN REIN, FORBES.COM

Ferrari for auction.Do billionaires have any traits in common?

Research reveals three qualities common to people who build great fortunes.

Have you dreamed of becoming a billionaire?

Based on the response I’ve gotten to my recent article Three Myths About Starting Your Own Business, many people have. They imagine having wealth like the founders of Google and Apple, so they can fly to their own chateaus on the French Riviera in a Gulfstream IV or maybe even a Boeing 737. They picture making it onto the Forbes Rich List and buying diamonds from Tiffany.

What does it take to get that rich? Are billionaires completely different from you and me? My firm, the China Market Research Group, decided to see if we could answer those questions and if there were any secrets we could learn from them. Over the last five years we interviewed secretive real estate tycoons in China who own companies through proxies for fear of being too high-profile, internet pioneers in the US who party with rock stars, multi-generational conglomerate tycoons in India and retail heirs in Europe who hit the Alps to ski. In all, we interviewed about a dozen billionaires and several dozen people worth more than $USD 100 million. We had fun doing it, too, from gambling at racetracks in Hong Kong to chomping on biscuits in Boston.

While almost everyone we interviewed said luck and timing played a role in their success, we found some other similarities in their responses, too. Most of the truly rich, perhaps surprisingly, are not that different from you and me. They have the same fears about their children and their health, and the same desires. But we did find some differences.

We narrowed those differences down to three secrets of the truly rich that most of the people we talked to said had helped them get to where they are:

The first secret of the truly rich is that they are never afraid to fail. Most of our interviewees told us that at one point they had had a choice to either stick to an easy, secure route or take a calculated risk. To reach the truly heights of wealth, some risk is needed. If you look for security in a job or are scared to try something different, you won’t get far in the pursuit of true wealth.

Even when they had failed-and every single one of them had at least once-the truly rich said they had used those experiences to learn from their mistakes and get back in the saddle. They had avoided the real failure of letting a bad experience destroy their optimism and their passion. Leer más “How to be a billionaire”