Tecnología NFCNear Field Communication. Se trata de una tecnología inalámbrica que funciona en la banda de los 13.56MHz y que deriva de las etiquetas RFID (sistema de almacenamiento y recuperación de datos remoto, que pueden ser pegatinas adheridas a un objeto proporcionando información por medio de unas antenas). Están presentes en abonos de transporte o incluso en sistemas de seguridad de tiendas físicas.

Es una plataforma abierta pensada desde el inicio para teléfonos y dispositivos móviles. Su tasa de transferencia puede alcanzar los 424 kbit/s por lo que su enfoque, más que para la transmisión de grandes cantidades de datos, es para la comunicación instantánea. Su punto fuerte está por lo tanto en la velocidad de comunicación y en el reducido alcance que exige (se mueve en un rango máximo de 20 cm y para que sea óptima se necesitan 4 cm), que hace que los datos que se transmiten sea casi imposibles de hackear.

THE GOAT WORLD

Son muchos los que desde 2012 ya venían diciendo que 2013 será el año del marketing móvil. En menor medida hay quién cree que para eso aún queda un poco más o es escéptico al  respecto…. Y mientras esto se debate por foros y redes, avances tecnológicos de los que ya se hablaba en 2005 y tan lejanos parecían ya comienzan a formar parte de algunos dispositivos. En mi opinión es más productivo conocer estos cambios y reconocer los que afectarán de alguna manera al marketing móvil.

De todas las tecnologías que se han ido incorporando en los dispositivos móviles solo voy a mencionar aquellas que considero necesarias para saber hacia dónde evolucionarán los móviles e ir pensando en futuras estrategias para este mercado (que sin duda alguna está en pleno auge).

Tecnología NFC: Near Field Communication. Se trata de una tecnología inalámbrica que funciona en la banda…

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NFC Technology What is it… | qrcodepress.com


qrcodepress.com

Near field communication (NFC) technology embodies a set of standards for smart phones and other mobile devices that establish communications between such devices using radio frequencies.NFC Technology and Smartposter These transmissions can only be facilitated over short distances, hence the name of the technology. Typically, devices must either be touching or within an inch of one another in order to interface through NFC, but these devices do not require wires of any sort. NFC technology is an effective means of data transmission, especially in the commerce field.

Radio frequency identification (RFID) first emerged in 1983. NFC technology was developed as an offshoot of RFID, but did not garner any significant attention until 2004, when Nokia, Philips, and Sony founded the NFC Forum, a conglomerate that aims to promote the standardized use of the technology. Nokia was the first company to produce an NFC-enabled phone in 2006, thus drawing a significant amount of consumers attention to the technology. In recent years, NFC technology has become the cornerstone of mobile commerce.

Mobile commerce relies heavily on NFC technology. The technology enables smart phones and similar mobile devices to serve as mobile payment platforms, which can be used by consumers to make purchases of goods and services. Only mobile devices that are equipped with NFC chips can participate in mobile commerce. Typically, the financial information of a consumer is stored within this chip, or the mobile device itself. This information is then accessed to make transactions. By itself, NFC technology cannot initiate mobile transactions. Thus, mobile applications, often called mobile wallets, are needed to facilitate these payments. Leer más “NFC Technology What is it… | qrcodepress.com”

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Mcommerce study predicts increase by 300 percent in 3 years

Though smartphones will play an important role over the holiday season, by 2015 there will be massive growth. The results of a recent study by Tapjoy have shown that while the next couple of months should be quite defining for mcommerce, over the next three years, the sector will increase by well over 300 percent (up to 362 percent in the United States). This will occur as more consumers buy smartphones and use them to make their … Read entire article »

Mobile commerce app to be used year round by Sears

The application had previously been used on a seasonal basis to drive sales. As Sears releases the 60th edition of its Wish Book catalog it is also releasing it in a mobile commerce format for iPads for the second year in a row. The retailer’s catalog has become a holiday tradition for many shoppers. Sears is attempting to make certain that the catalog … Read entire article »

What is NFC Technology…

Near field communication (NFC) technology embodies a set of standards for smart phones and other mobile devices that establish communications between such devices using radio frequencies.
These transmissions can only be facilitated over short distances, hence the name of the technology.
Full story

 

In France, QR code stickers provide medical data for emergency responders

Japanese-based Asahi Kasei has previously used RFID technology in portable charms to alert medical personnel to important patient information when dealing with emergencies. Now, using stickers featuring QR codes, Code d’Urgence in France is also on a mission to improve data delivery to those responding to accidents and emergencies.

Those registering for the service must first fill out a medical questionnaire from the company, which must be validated by a doctor. Users pay for an annual subscription, costing EUR 36, and this information is then stored on a secure server approved by the Ministére de la Santé for one year.

The company then sends out 10 stickers featuring a unique QR code to the user, suitable for placing onto motorcycle helmets, bike frames, behind watch faces or on the back of cell phones — the company provides a list of recommended sticker locations upon subscription.


Code d’Urgence provides customers with 10 stickers featuring a unique QR code that links to their medical history.

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Japanese-based Asahi Kasei has previously used RFID technology in portable charms to alert medical personnel to important patient information when dealing with emergencies. Now, using stickers featuring QR codesCode d’Urgence in Franceis also on a mission to improve data delivery to those responding to accidents and emergencies.Those registering for the service must first fill out a medical questionnaire from the company, which must be validated by a doctor. Users pay for an annual subscription, costing EUR 36, and this information is then stored on a secure serverapproved by the Ministére de la Santé for one year.The company then sends out 10 stickers featuring a unique QR code to the user, suitable for placing onto motorcycle helmets, bike frames, behind watch faces or on the back of cell phones — the company provides a list of recommended sticker locations upon subscription.

The code can be read quickly by medical professionals equipped with the secure Code d’Urgence smartphone app, enabling them to respond in the best way possible. According to the developers, Code d’Urgence is the only system of its kind to have been made in collaboration with the country’s SAMU (Service d’Aide Médicale Urgente) and SMUR (Service Mobile d’Urgence et Reanimation) doctors. It is also compliant with the Commission Nationale Informatique et Liberté, which means all the medical data is secure and only accessible to medical professionals. The video below contains more details >>>> Leer más “In France, QR code stickers provide medical data for emergency responders”

Facebook in the real world – amazing case study

Each of the people with the bracelets were invited to swipe their bands at certain places to give a ‘Like’ to that particular product or activity. And they were also able to upload their own pictures to their Facebook profiles, where they were automatically tagged. Over 650 teenagers used the RFID bracelets over 3 days and over 35,000 ‘Likes’ were made. Pretty impressive, especially when you consider how many friends those people would have reached through their individual newsfeeds.


 

coca cola 200x200 Facebook in the real world   amazing case studyIt’s a rare moment when I see something being done online and instantly want to try it out for one of our clients. This however, is a great example of integrating Facebook with your offline marketing activity in a completely new way that I would love to try! It comes from Coca Cola in India Israel. At their amusement park in India Israel, an annual event called Coca Cola Village,  they issued customers with an RFID (radio frequency identification) bracelet that contained their Facebook details. Check out what they did with it in the video below :

 

Each of the people with the bracelets were invited to swipe their bands at certain places to give a ‘Like’ to that particular product or activity. And they were also able to upload their own pictures to their Facebook profiles, where they were automatically tagged. Over 650 teenagers used the RFID bracelets over 3 days and over 35,000 ‘Likes’ were made. Pretty impressive, especially when you consider how many friends those people would have reached through their individual newsfeeds.

This is the kind of thing that really gets me excited. Seeing social technology being used in a completely new way, but importantly integrating with ‘real world’ activity. There’s nothing better for a brand than having hundreds of people running around actually ‘Liking’ all your content and sharing it with your friends. And because it’s something completely new for the user, they go around swiping everything in sight! Leer más “Facebook in the real world – amazing case study”

Coca-Cola gets easier to ‘like’ via Facebook RFID tag

If you’re a teenager buzzing from gallons of Coca-Cola, you might find there just aren’t enough hours in the day to make all the Facebook posts you’d like.

So the marketing agency for a ‘pop-up’ three-day amusement park in Israel has come up with a way of making it quicker.

Edologic issued visitors to the Coca-Cola Village Amusement Park with RFID bracelets as they went in, which were programmed with the teenagers’ Facebook details.

If the kids liked a particular ride or activity, they just swiped the bracelet past an RFID reader to post a ‘like’ on Facebook. They could also swipe the park’s official photographers to ensure that photos were uploaded to the Coca-Cola Village Facebook page with their faces already tagged.


Emma Woollacott

If you’re a teenager buzzing from gallons of Coca-Cola, you might find there just aren’t enough hours in the day to make all the Facebook posts you’d like.

So the marketing agency for a ‘pop-up’ three-day amusement park in Israel has come up with a way of making it quicker.

Edologic issued visitors to the Coca-Cola Village Amusement Park with RFID bracelets as they went in, which were programmed with the teenagers’ Facebook details.

If the kids liked a particular ride or activity, they just swiped the bracelet past an RFID reader to post a ‘like’ on Facebook. They could also swipe the park’s official photographers to ensure that photos were uploaded to the Coca-Cola Village Facebook page with their faces already tagged. Leer más “Coca-Cola gets easier to ‘like’ via Facebook RFID tag”

Coca-Cola brings Facebook to holidays

The real and virtual worlds have come one step closer, thanks to a campaign for Coca-Cola via Publicis E-dologic in Israel.

The brand has been connecting with teens at its Coca-Cola Village in Israel. Each of the visitors was provided with a bracelet containing an RFID tag, which, when touched to a sensor, linked back to its Facebook page, transferring the like from the physical world into the virtual.

The 650 visitors who were in the Village at any one time contributed to up to 35,000 pieces of content per group over their three day stay. Each visitor posted an average of 54 branded pieces of Coke merchandise to their facebook page.


English and Hebrew Coke labels in an Israeli s...
Image via Wikipedia

The real and virtual worlds have come one step closer, thanks to a campaign for Coca-Cola via Publicis E-dologic in Israel.

The brand has been connecting with teens at its Coca-Cola Village in Israel. Each of the visitors was provided with a bracelet containing an RFID tag, which, when touched to a sensor, linked back to its Facebook page, transferring the like from the physical world into the virtual.

The 650 visitors who were in the Village at any one time contributed to up to 35,000 pieces of content per group over their three day stay. Each visitor posted an average of 54 branded pieces of Coke merchandise to their facebook page. Leer más “Coca-Cola brings Facebook to holidays”

Wal-Mart proyecta etiquetado electrónico de ropa

A partir del próximo mes Wal-Mart proyecta implementar un sistema de etiquetas identificadoras para rastrear, po ejemplo, pares de vaqueros o ropa interior. Es el primer paso de un sistema de mejoramiento en el control de inventario. Es otra aplicación de la tecnología por radiofrecuencia, o RFID.

Las “tarjetas inteligentes” sobre prendas de vestir se leen con escáners manuales. De esa forma los empleados podrán saber rápidamente qué talles de vaqueros están faltando y acelerar la reposición. Si da buen resultado, las etiquetas de radiofrecuencia se aplicarán a más productos en todos los puntos de venta Wal-Mart.
Hasta ahora, la cadena – y los demàs minoristas – usaban tarjetas RFID pero sólo para escanear a la distancia y rastrear los pallets de mercadería que viajan a través de la cadena de suministro.


A partir del próximo mes Wal-Mart proyecta implementar un sistema de etiquetas identificadoras para rastrear, po ejemplo, pares de vaqueros o ropa interior. Es el primer paso de un sistema de mejoramiento en el control de inventario. Es otra aplicación de la tecnología por radiofrecuencia, o RFID.

Las “tarjetas inteligentes” sobre prendas de vestir se leen con escáners manuales. De esa forma los empleados podrán saber rápidamente qué talles de vaqueros están faltando y acelerar la reposición. Si da buen resultado, las etiquetas de radiofrecuencia se aplicarán a más productos en todos los puntos de venta Wal-Mart.
Hasta ahora, la cadena – y los demàs minoristas – usaban tarjetas RFID pero sólo para escanear a la distancia y rastrear los pallets de mercadería que viajan a través de la cadena de suministro. Leer más “Wal-Mart proyecta etiquetado electrónico de ropa”

Recap of the Technology

At the recent ReadWriteWeb Mobile Summit, I convened a session about emerging mobile applications for sensors and other Internet of Things technologies. It ended up being a lively discussion on the possibilities for new types of mobile apps that will take advantage of sensor and RFID data. The raw notes of the session are here, thanks to Pat Dash. In this post I’ll flesh out some of the ideas.

This will be a 2-part post. In Part 1, we’ll cover food and supply chain apps, social networking, and retail. In Part 2, we’ll look at future apps for environment, buildings, and health.
Recap of the Technology

First, let’s quickly re-visit the technology. Sensors, barcodes and RFID tags are all emerging methods of connecting real-world objects to the Internet. As I explained in my keynote presentation at the Mobile Summit, modern smart phones are increasingly being used to read and write this data.

Smart phones can be used as both readers (e.g. barcode scanning) and writers (e.g. swiping your phone over an RFID Reader to purchase a subway ticket).

Sensor technology is one of the most intriguing areas of innovation currently in smart phones. Firstly, the phone may read and act on sensor data from real world objects; data like temperature, noise and activity. Secondly, the phone may be used as a sensor itself; for example enabling other phone-toting people to sense your proximity to them.


At the recent ReadWriteWeb Mobile Summit, I convened a session about emerging mobile applications for sensors and other Internet of Things technologies. It ended up being a lively discussion on the possibilities for new types of mobile apps that will take advantage of sensor and RFID data. The raw notes of the session are here, thanks to Pat Dash. In this post I’ll flesh out some of the ideas.

This will be a 2-part post. In Part 1, we’ll cover food and supply chain apps, social networking, and retail. In Part 2, we’ll look at future apps for environment, buildings, and health.

Recap of the Technology

First, let’s quickly re-visit the technology. Sensors, barcodes and RFID tags are all emerging methods of connecting real-world objects to the Internet. As I explained in my keynote presentation at the Mobile Summit, modern smart phones are increasingly being used to read and write this data.

Smart phones can be used as both readers (e.g. barcode scanning) and writers (e.g. swiping your phone over an RFID Reader to purchase a subway ticket).

Sensor technology is one of the most intriguing areas of innovation currently in smart phones. Firstly, the phone may read and act on sensor data from real world objects; data like temperature, noise and activity. Secondly, the phone may be used as a sensor itself; for example enabling other phone-toting people to sense your proximity to them. Leer más “Recap of the Technology”