BY STEFAN LINDEGAAR: Open innovation is like dating!


While he was the head of Connect+Develop at P&G, Chris Thoen, said that open innovation is very much like dating. You need to look good so that you can become the preferred partner of choice among your suitors.I like stories, analogies and metaphors on open innovation as they can help better communicate the benefits as well as the challenges of open innovation. Here you get some of my favorites. Let me know what you think and please add your own. It would be great to have a collection of this.

Playgrounds and sandboxes: I often liken open innovation – and even more relevant today the use of social media for innovation efforts – to a playground or…

Crowdsourcing creativo o la democratización del talento | Juan Ramón Moreno | Marketing Comunidad

Por otra parte, aquellos que demandan trabajos creativos también son conscientes de estos cambios y quieren experimentarlos. De hecho, son cada vez más las organizaciones que, independientemente de su tamaño, recurren al crowdsourcing creativo como parte de su estrategia. Por ejemplo, Doritos lo ha empleado por segundo año consecutivo para realizar el spot que se ha emitido en la Super Bowl de 2012, otorgando cinco premios de 25.000 dólares a los cinco finalistas seleccionados. También Procter & Gamble, Heinz y General Motors, entre otras compañías, ya están usando este modelo de trabajo obteniendo magníficos resultados.

Las ventajas del crowdsourcing creativo favorecen tanto a las empresas como a la comunidad de profesionales. Por un lado, este modelo de negocio contribuye a la democratización del talento. Cualquier compañía puede obtener una nueva identidad, un vídeo corporativo, un spot de televisión, un guión…ajustando la demanda a sus necesidades económicas. Por otra parte, para las agencias es un nuevo método de externalizar determinados servicios y para los profesionales supone una novedosa fuente de generación de empleo. Además, a través de plataformas de crowdsourcing los creativos pueden acceder a miles de empresas y pymes a las que, de otro modo no podrían llegar, lo que les ayuda a intensificar sus relaciones comerciales.


Via Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

El crowdsourcing es un fenómeno relativamente reciente en nuestro país, que tiene su origen en Estados Unidos, y que cada vez cobra más presencia en Internet. Este término, acuñado por Jeff Howe, escritor y editor de la revista “Wired”, surgió como una forma de externalizar trabajos y de aprovechar las mejores ideas de un colectivo a través de Internet, pero gracias a su éxito se ha transformado en un modelo de negocio en el que ya confían muchas empresas de diferentes sectores de actividad. Leer más “Crowdsourcing creativo o la democratización del talento | Juan Ramón Moreno | Marketing Comunidad”

Facebook’s 6-Point Plan for Building Brands in the Social Media Age

It’s easy to see how this reflects a TV-dominated age. In the pre-social media days, you’d see a TV ad and become aware of a brand. Then, after you got familiar with the name, you might consider if you wanted to buy it. Next, you bought it. Then, you might decide you liked it. Finally, you identified yourself with the brand. (“I’m a Budweiser guy.”)

Here is what Facebook and Forrester are proposing as the successor to the purchase funnel. It looks more like a circle:

In this schematic, social media influences every stage of the process. They hear about new brands and investigate said brands via social media. When it comes time to buy something, consumers increasingly consult their friends via social media. Then, they expect to be able to interact with the brands through social media after they buy a product.

The new environment calls for new tactics. Facebook and Forrester propose a six-point plan for building brands in the social media age: articulate, connect, engage, influence, integrate and rejuvenate. We will look at each in greater detail.


by 
http://mashable.com

The Digital Marketing Series is supported by HubSpot, an inbound marketing software company based in Cambridge, Mass., that makes a full platform of marketing software, including social media management tools.

Social media has turned the purchase funnel on its head.

That’s the crux of a study that Facebook recently published in conjunction with Forrester Research. The two canvassed 101 C-level and VP-level marketing pros in December 2011 and found the profession has changed. Or, in Facebook and Forrester’s parlance, “The connected world has rerouted the customer journey.”

How does changing media affect the way people hear about brands? First, take a look at the traditional purchase funnel:

It’s easy to see how this reflects a TV-dominated age. In the pre-social media days, you’d see a TV ad and become aware of a brand. Then, after you got familiar with the name, you might consider if you wanted to buy it. Next, you bought it. Then, you might decide you liked it. Finally, you identified yourself with the brand. (“I’m a Budweiser guy.”)

Here is what Facebook and Forrester are proposing as the successor to the purchase funnel. It looks more like a circle:

In this schematic, social media influences every stage of the process. They hear about new brands and investigate said brands via social media. When it comes time to buy something, consumers increasingly consult their friends via social media. Then, they expect to be able to interact with the brands through social media after they buy a product.

The new environment calls for new tactics. Facebook and Forrester propose a six-point plan for building brands in the social media age: articulate, connect, engage, influence, integrate and rejuvenate. We will look at each in greater detail.


1. Articulate


Facebook and Forrester recommend that companies identify components of the brand it can communicate via social media. The report has a suggestion for how to do this. “Apply a social lens to your brand identity by asking ‘What about my brand is inherently social? Why do people engage with it and why do people want to talk about it or share it with their friends in the real world?’” Often, those attributes aren’t obvious. For instance, Secret, Procter & Gamble’s deodorant brand for women, found it got currency by connecting with women on an inspirational level and got behind a Facebook-based anti-bullying campaign, “Mean Stinks.” For Coca-Cola, the attribute was “happiness,” which it attempts to express via social media. Leer más “Facebook’s 6-Point Plan for Building Brands in the Social Media Age”

Biggest brands: Top 100 online advertisers 2010

As many advertisers were forced to cut back last year, so media owners probably comforted themselves with the thought that no part of the industry was immune to the effects of the UK’s deepest recession since the 30s.

However, the latest research shows that digital media have, to some degree, managed to ride the storm. According to Nielsen, overall internet adspend rose from £461.4bn in 2008 to £506.3bn in 2009 – a 9.7% year-on-year increase. While half of the UK’s top 100 online advertisers cut their media spend in 2009, more than 80% of them increased their internet investment; many of them attracted by the prospect of solid ROI at a time when they were striving to cut marketing costs.

See Table (Ranking)

(…)

More for less

Regardless of the effects of the recession, there appears to be a growing belief among brands that increasing adspend does not guarantee marketing success. By its own reckoning, Moneysupermarket.com, the 10th-placed online advertiser in the list, spent 22% less on its marketing last year, including search, but was still able to attract 14% more customers.

‘For us, it has become less about how much you spend and more about what you say and how you say it,’ says Ian Williams, the brand’s director of communications.

In a handful of sectors there was a sharp reduction in internet adspend. While they continue to make extensive use of the channel, media/entertainment brands collectively cut their budgets for online marketing by almost 16%.

Other sectors where big falls occurred include retail, which spent 42.3% less, and the property and pharmaceutical sectors, which made reductions of 45.5% and 55.2% respectively. However, while property and pharmaceuticals cut their marketing across the board last year, retailers raised their budgets overall; this suggests that online price deflation has enabled advertisers in this sector to make significant savings.


Brand Republic: Connecting advertising, marketing, media & PR

Adam Woods | //brandrepublic.com

While the recession cut a swathe through above-the-line media channels, digital marketing grasped the opportunity to prove itself, writes Adam Woods.

O2 top digital advertiser increased internet marketing expenditure by 22.8% year on yearO2 top digital advertiser increased internet marketing expenditure by 22.8% year on year

As many advertisers were forced to cut back last year, so media owners probably comforted themselves with the thought that no part of the industry was immune to the effects of the UK’s deepest recession since the 30s.

However, the latest research shows that digital media have, to some degree, managed to ride the storm. According to Nielsen, overall internet adspend rose from £461.4bn in 2008 to £506.3bn in 2009 – a 9.7% year-on-year increase. While half of the UK’s top 100 online advertisers cut their media spend in 2009, more than 80% of them increased their internet investment; many of them attracted by the prospect of solid ROI at a time when they were striving to cut marketing costs.

See Table (Ranking)

(…)

More for less

Regardless of the effects of the recession, there appears to be a growing belief among brands that increasing adspend does not guarantee marketing success. By its own reckoning, Moneysupermarket.com, the 10th-placed online advertiser in the list, spent 22% less on its marketing last year, including search, but was still able to attract 14% more customers.

‘For us, it has become less about how much you spend and more about what you say and how you say it,’ says Ian Williams, the brand’s director of communications.

In a handful of sectors there was a sharp reduction in internet adspend. While they continue to make extensive use of the channel, media/entertainment brands collectively cut their budgets for online marketing by almost 16%.

Other sectors where big falls occurred include retail, which spent 42.3% less, and the property and pharmaceutical sectors, which made reductions of 45.5% and 55.2% respectively. However, while property and pharmaceuticals cut their marketing across the board last year, retailers raised their budgets overall; this suggests that online price deflation has enabled advertisers in this sector to make significant savings. Leer más “Biggest brands: Top 100 online advertisers 2010”

A Good Housekeeping Seal for the Twitter Age

Aiming to be a sort of Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval for the social media age, a startup called TwitterMoms is working with Procter & Gamble and Quickie Manufacturing to get its ratings on their products in stores. In a modern twist, the ratings and reviews will be accessible instantly via QR codes printed on product packaging.

Megan Calhoun, founder of TwitterMoms—which boasts 30,000 “influential” mommy bloggers (each member has at least 1,000 followers on Twitter)—said the organization introduced the initiative to provide a one-stop, reliable source of product information for moms.

“The way product reviews were done before, there was no credibility, no easy way to access [all that was being said] about a product—to the point where the [Federal Trade Commission] stepped in,” Calhoun said, referring to the FTC’s stringent rules governing blogger-marketer relationships.


– Elaine Wong | //brandweek.com
Aiming to be a sort of Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval for the social media age, a startup called TwitterMoms is working with Procter & Gamble and Quickie Manufacturing to get its ratings on their products in stores. In a modern twist, the ratings and reviews will be accessible instantly via QR codes printed on product packaging.

Megan Calhoun, founder of TwitterMoms—which boasts 30,000 “influential” mommy bloggers (each member has  at least 1,000 followers on Twitter)—said the organization introduced the initiative to provide a one-stop, reliable source of product information for moms.

“The way product reviews were done before, there was no credibility, no easy way to access [all that was being said] about a product—to the point where the [Federal Trade Commission] stepped in,” Calhoun said, referring to the FTC’s stringent rules governing blogger-marketer relationships.

For marketers, the benefits are twofold: They get customer feedback on products and marketing strategies, and they’re able to escape some of the finger-pointing that comes from sending bloggers new products, often in hopes of getting gushy reviews.

In the case of TwitterMoms, women are given product samples to try and evaluate at home, and then asked to offer honest and practical feedback for both marketers and their peers. Panels usually consist of 25 to 30 “experts,” and the groups are drawn from a subset of 1,200 TwitterMoms members. (The goal is to capture a subgroup that’s best representative of its community, Calhoun said.)

The organization then works with the advertiser to come up with a set of criteria for evaluating the product. If the product “meets or exceeds” all guidelines 85 percent or more of the time, the marketer is awarded a “Moms Like This” seal of approval.

Companies pay TwitterMoms to assemble the groups and for the rights to run the ratings information. TwitterMoms, in turn, pays panelists for their contributions. The setup is designed this way so that the women aren’t taking money from the companies they’re reviewing.

Augie DeLuca, chief marketing officer for Quickie, said the primary appeal was the opportunity to gain “unbiased and objective feedback” from bloggers. The Cinnaminson, N.J.–based company next month will launch its first product carrying TwitterMoms’ seal of approval: an improved version of its Microfiber Twist Mop.

Following a six-week evaluation process by moms, Quickie garnered insights on how to improve the “efficacy and efficiency” of its mop. Research showed that 96 percent of the moms who tried it would “recommend it to their peers,” the company found.

Leer más “A Good Housekeeping Seal for the Twitter Age”

Google, Microsoft, Yahoo Dish on Integrated Solutions for Reaching Customers across Online Landscape

Mitch Spolan, VP of North American Field Sales & Advertising Agencies, Yahoo

There’s display, content and search. What if we leveraged all the screen space, told a story, and made an emotional connection? The idea’s not far from Tim Armstrong’s point that only 18% of online space is used for content. In this case, the content is mostly referring to advertising. He showed a compelling example with Chevy showing a major spike in brand recall and Yahoo! Buzz with an immersive takeover of Yahoo’s login screen.

Carolyn Everson, CVP, Global Ad Sales & Strategy, Microsoft

Their DNA is to be a partnership company. Then consumers started making their own IT decisions. With that revolution, Microsoft is reinventing how it approaches advertising and the marketplace. Microsoft is 3 different companies: a technology company, a marketer (spending $2 billion a year), and an advertising company. Its focus is now on innovating with marketers

Jim Lecinski, Managing Director, US Sales, Google

Google discussed the Zero Moment of Truth (ZMOT) – a moment before consumers ever encounter a product on a shelf, something before what Procter & Gamble called the First Moment of Truth (FMOT) where consumers have that initial experience. Google can target consumers where they are and where they’ve been. The concept is integration at a concentrated, pre-planned effort. Read more about ZMOT on Google’s CPG blog.


by David Berkowitzhttp://blog.360i.com

Mitch Spolan, VP of North American Field Sales & Advertising Agencies, Yahoo

There’s display, content and search. What if we leveraged all the screen space, told a story, and made an emotional connection? The idea’s not far from Tim Armstrong’s point that only 18% of online space is used for content. In this case, the content is mostly referring to advertising. He showed a compelling example with Chevy showing a major spike in brand recall and Yahoo! Buzz with an immersive takeover of Yahoo’s login screen.

Carolyn Everson, CVP, Global Ad Sales & Strategy, Microsoft

Their DNA is to be a partnership company. Then consumers started making their own IT decisions. With that revolution, Microsoft is reinventing how it approaches advertising and the marketplace. Microsoft is 3 different companies: a technology company, a marketer (spending $2 billion a year), and an advertising company. Its focus is now on innovating with marketers

Jim Lecinski, Managing Director, US Sales, Google

Google discussed the Zero Moment of Truth (ZMOT) – a moment before consumers ever encounter a product on a shelf, something before what Procter & Gamble called the First Moment of Truth (FMOT) where consumers have that initial experience. Google can target consumers where they are and where they’ve been. The concept is integration at a concentrated, pre-planned effort. Read more about ZMOT on Google’s CPG blog. Leer más “Google, Microsoft, Yahoo Dish on Integrated Solutions for Reaching Customers across Online Landscape”

Grand Marketer of the Year 2010: James Moorhead, Old Spice

In the 1970s, an Old Spice TV commercial opened with a shot of a woman lounging on a corner-unit sofa covered in garishly patterned cushions, surrounded by a jungle of potted palms and ethnic statuettes—a fading hippie paradise. The brunette, wearing a one-piece catsuit with bell-bottoms two feet wide at the ankles, pages idly through a magazine. “Old Spice,” the woman muses in a breathy internal monologue. “It’s a nice smell to snuggle up to.” The scene cuts to a younger woman walking through a city park with fountains—she’s the classic NYU student type, once a staple of Woody Allen’s movies back when Woody Allen’s movies were funny. “That Old Spice—wow!” she thinks aloud. “He sure knows what he’s doing!”

You could reshoot that spot today for its unintentional comic value and it would fit right in with Procter & Gamble’s current efforts for Old Spice, the seemingly ubiquitous “Smell like a man, man” campaign.


MARKETER OF THE YEAR 2010
By Jim Edwards

Photograph by Tim Llewellyn

In the 1970s, an Old Spice TV commercial opened with a shot of a woman lounging on a corner-unit sofa covered in garishly patterned cushions, surrounded by a jungle of potted palms and ethnic statuettes—a fading hippie paradise. The brunette, wearing a one-piece catsuit with bell-bottoms two feet wide at the ankles, pages idly through a magazine. “Old Spice,” the woman muses in a breathy internal monologue. “It’s a nice smell to snuggle up to.” The scene cuts to a younger woman walking through a city park with fountains—she’s the classic NYU student type, once a staple of Woody Allen‘s movies back when Woody Allen’s movies were funny. “That Old Spice—wow!” she thinks aloud. “He sure knows what he’s doing!”

You could reshoot that spot today for its unintentional comic value and it would fit right in with Procter & Gamble‘s current efforts for Old Spice, the seemingly ubiquitous “Smell like a man, man” campaign. Leer más “Grand Marketer of the Year 2010: James Moorhead, Old Spice”