Review: Processing for Visual Artists

My first thought upon receiving a review copy of “Processing for Visual Artists” by Andrew Glassner was “hey, yet another Processing book?” Glassner is well aware of the ubiquity of Processing literature, however, and targets a specific gap, following his philosophy “that artists and designers are not interested in programming for its own sake, but only as a means to an end: creating expressive work”. This book is made for people who have never written a program before or don’t feel very comfortable in the world of code. Glassner invites the reader to peek over his shoulder to learn about his programming process using a friendly and informal style, which is motivating and makes the book easy and fun to read. And if you like to cook or play the piano (I do!), you’ll feel right at home with Glassner’s many real-world analogies.

The beginning of the book is basically a casual conversation between the author and the reader – master and apprentice –, showing the reader around, introducing computer science terminology, and most of all, taking away the fear of the seemingly steep learning curve. Glassner shows a lot of empathy towards someone new to programming, acknowledging that it will look overwhelmingly complex at first and be hard work, but that, just like learning to ride a bike or playing chords on a piano, the complexity will soon fade away, allowing even a novice programmer to create exciting work. He has three pieces of advice: there is no way you can break your computer with your program, type every code listing by hand (so it’ll sink in), and don’t be afraid of errors. In fact, Glassner left the errors he made when creating the example code right there in the book, so that, as the reader follows him along, he will see where and why an error was made and how it was fixed.

Anuncios

http://datavisualization.ch/opinions/review-processing-for-visual-artists
Review: Processing for Visual Artists The book’s author, Dr. Andrew Glassner,
is a writer-director, and a consultant in story structure, interactive fiction, and computer graphics. He started working in 3D computer graphics in 1978, and has carried out research at many respected labs.


My first thought upon receiving a review copy of “Processing for Visual Artists” by Andrew Glassner was “hey, yet another Processing book?” Glassner is well aware of the ubiquity of Processing literature, however, and targets a specific gap, following his philosophy “that artists and designers are not interested in programming for its own sake, but only as a means to an end: creating expressive work”. This book is made for people who have never written a program before or don’t feel very comfortable in the world of code. Glassner invites the reader to peek over his shoulder to learn about his programming process using a friendly and informal style, which is motivating and makes the book easy and fun to read. And if you like to cook or play the piano (I do!), you’ll feel right at home with Glassner’s many real-world analogies.

The beginning of the book is basically a casual conversation between the author and the reader – master and apprentice –, showing the reader around, introducing computer science terminology, and most of all, taking away the fear of the seemingly steep learning curve. Glassner shows a lot of empathy towards someone new to programming, acknowledging that it will look overwhelmingly complex at first and be hard work, but that, just like learning to ride a bike or playing chords on a piano, the complexity will soon fade away, allowing even a novice programmer to create exciting work. He has three pieces of advice: there is no way you can break your computer with your program, type every code listing by hand (so it’ll sink in), and don’t be afraid of errors. In fact, Glassner left the errors he made when creating the example code right there in the book, so that, as the reader follows him along, he will see where and why an error was made and how it was fixed. Leer más “Review: Processing for Visual Artists”