Microsoft claims Gmail is invading your privacy, makes plea to use Outlook.com


Microsoft claims Gmail is invading your privacy, makes plea to use Outlook.com

Microsoft really wants its Outlook.com email app to pick up new users. Its solution? Attack the hell out of Google’s incredibly popular Gmail service.

via Sean Ludwig | Venturebeat.com

In November, Microsoft tried to go after Google’s credibility by claiming that Google Shopping results were all advertisements rather than fair comparisons of products around the web. Now it appears Microsoft is going after an even meatier target than Google Shopping by attacking Gmail.

The new Scroogled.com site from Microsoft makes the case that Gmail snoops on all of your emails to serve you better ads.

“Google goes through every Gmail that’s sent or received, looking for keywords so they can target Gmail users with paid ads,” the site claims. “And there’s no way to opt out of this invasion of your privacy.”

Some of what Microsoft is saying is true. Google does scan email keywords so it can contextually serve you advertising. However, it is clearly lying when it says there is no way opt out. As Marketing Land points out, you can not have Google reading your emails by using the basic HTML version of Gmail, using a third-party email client, or paying $50 a year for Google Apps and opting out that way.

Leer más “Microsoft claims Gmail is invading your privacy, makes plea to use Outlook.com”

Foursquare community… policy change!


 

2012 has been a pretty huge year. We’ve released over fifty new features, welcomed nearly 15,000,000 new people to Foursquare, and had our 3,000,000,000th check-in. It’s a bit clichéd to say this, but your support really is what keeps us going day after day.

As our product evolves, one of the things we do is update our policies to match it. And a big aspect of that is privacy (something we think about a lot). This email lays out a couple changes that we’ll be making to our privacy policy in the coming month, and explains how they affect you and what you can do about it.

Logo for Foursquare

We know that privacy policies can be dense, so we put together a high-level document that we think of as our “Privacy 101.” It describes, in an easy-to-read way, how we build privacy into our product. While it doesn’t replace the legal need for the complete description of our privacy practices (which you can read here), we hope it helps you better understand how we think about privacy. We’ve also added new explanations of how privacy works throughout the app in our FAQs, including our default privacy settings and how they can be adjusted.

In addition to creating and refining those documents, we want to point out two specific changes to our policy, both of which will go into effect on January 28, 2013… > Leer más “Foursquare community… policy change!”

¿Cómo medir la efectividad de Facebook para las empresas?


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

¿Cuáles son los indicadores o KPIs a valorar en Facebook?

Número de “Me gustas”
Número de recomendaciones
Número de “Me gustas” en comentarios
Número de comentarios
Número de impresiones
Número de visitas al Site desde la Fan Page
Estadísticas específicas de cada campaña Leer más “¿Cómo medir la efectividad de Facebook para las empresas?”

Latest Articles | nakedsecurity.sophos.com


Firefox 17 protects your privacy while enhancing the Facebook experience

by Chester Wisniewski on October 24

Firefox 17 protects your privacy while enhancing the Facebook experience

The latest beta release of Mozilla’s popular Firefox browser has introduced a new social media API. Can a web browser make it easier to use social media while protecing your privacy? Mozilla hopes so.

Offensive Facebook email leads to Blackhole malware attack

Offensive Facebook email leads to Blackhole malware attack

Facebook users are warned to be on their guard against unsolicited emails they might receive suggesting that someone has left an offensive comment about them on their wall.

Huawei UK makes a blunder with its online careers page

Huawei UK makes a blunder with its online careers page

Chinese technology giant Huawei, under the spotlight following US concerns that its technology could be used for undercover surveillance, has made an elementary mistake in regards to its UK careers page.

‘Parasite’ porn websites steal and spread images and videos of young people

Parasite sites are snatching and disseminating sexually explicit images of young people

A new study shows that 88% of sexually explicit photos and videos of children and other young people found online have been lifted from legitimate source sites, including social networking sites such as Facebook, video sites such as YouTube, or stolen/lost phones.

FTC smacks down security sloppiness by web analytics company Compete

ftc-250-blue

The FTC has settled with web analytics company Compete, Inc. over poor security. Compete has agreed not to do it again, and to audit itself every two years for 20 years.

What do you think? Is that a stiff enough penalty? Have your say in our comments section…

Just 15% Of Smartphone Users Trust All Mobile Apps With Personal Info


marketingcharts.com

truste-mobile-app-privacy-trust-july2012.pngOnly 15% of smartphone users trust all mobile applications with their personal information,according to [download page] a survey released in July 2012 by TRUSTe, conducted by Harris Interactive. Instead, mobile app consumers take a variety of steps to protect their personal information: 38% research the app online, and 34% check to see if an app has a privacy policy.30% will read that privacy policy (if it is provided), and 21% check for a third-party trustmark or seal. 19% will ask friends about trustworthiness.

Only 14% of smartphone users this year believe that their app stores only offer privacy-safe apps. That is down significantly from 25% in 2011, reveals the “2012 US Online and Mobile Privacy Perceptions Report.” Faced with a mobile app they distrust, 85% of smartphone users do not download it, while 8% limits the information they share with the app, 4% limit their usage of the app, and just 3% report they do not change their behavior.

Smartphone Users Uncomfortable Sharing Many Forms of Data

Smartphone users feel safest sharing their gender with mobile apps, with 49% saying they would consent to do so, with age (36%) and email (35%) following. On the other end of the spectrum, just 1% would consent to sharing their list of contacts, 3% their photos and videos, and 5% their home addresses. Only 6% of app users would consent to sharing web-surfing behavior, a key element of online behavioral advertising (OBA), and 58% expressly indicate they do not like OBA. Finally, 28% say they would not consent to sharing any personal data with mobile apps.

University of California-Berkeley researchers in July found a similar reticence about sharing personal contacts. While 82% of mobile owners store contact information on their devices, 81% of device owners would probably (30%) or definitely (51%) not allow social networking applications to mine those contacts for friend suggestions, and 93% would probably (18%) or definitely (75%) not allow a coupons app to mine the list in order to offer coupons to their contacts, per findings.

50% Would Opt Out Of OBA Leer más “Just 15% Of Smartphone Users Trust All Mobile Apps With Personal Info”

8 Tactful Ways to use your Personal Facebook Account as a Marketing Tool


 

http://blog.kissmetrics.com

Facebook personal profiles are not for business use. With that said, plenty of people use their personal profiles to interact with their target audience through sharing blog posts, industry news, and events. So today, we’re going to look at how to set up your personal profile for marketing and eight things you can do with your personal profile that can’t be done with Facebook business pages.

Before we begin, there are a few things that you will want to do before using your personal profile for marketing, in terms of privacy and making sure the right information is displayed on your profile. Leer más “8 Tactful Ways to use your Personal Facebook Account as a Marketing Tool”

[Infographic]: International Cloud Computing Policies

Small businesses are learning how to leverage the power of cloud computing, and loving it. With the decreasing costs of cloud computing, and its rising capabilities, it’s no wonder business owners are flocking to this new software. However, some businesses are still skeptical about integrating cloud computing, due to uncertainties in privacy and data protection. This is especially true If you’re considering supporting a widespread field service population that crosses geographic boundaries. Do you know the various privacy and data security laws for Germany, for example?

Well, you could hire a bunch of lawyers, but you could also check out our infographic that summarizes the best and worst places to have a cloud-based business.


By David Strom |  readwriteweb.com

Small businesses are learning how to leverage the power of cloud computing, and loving it. With the decreasing costs of cloud computing, and its rising capabilities, it’s no wonder business owners are flocking to this new software. However, some businesses are still skeptical about integrating cloud computing, due to uncertainties in privacy and data protection. This is especially true If you’re considering supporting a widespread field service population that crosses geographic boundaries. Do you know the various privacy and data security laws for Germany, for example?

Well, you could hire a bunch of lawyers, but you could also check out our infographic that summarizes the best and worst places to have a cloud-based business.

Thanks to ClickSoftware for preparing this infographic.

clicksave.png

 

Las mujeres gestionan las redes sociales mejor

La más general es que las mujeres utilizan mejor las redes sociales a la hora de gestionar su privacidad. La investigación revela que los perfiles de Facebook, LinkedIn y MySpace del 67% de las féminas sólo los pueden ver sus amigos, mientras que únicamente el 48% de los hombres tienen esta configuración.

El 26% de los varones tienen su perfil público, visible por cualquier usuario, mientras que sólo el 14% de las mujeres mantienen la privacidad tan abierta. El hecho de dar un mayor acceso a la información personal o restringirlo puede ser un indicador de cómo se usan las redes sociales.

Ya sea consecuencia de la estadística anterior o no, otro de los descubrimientos delestudio indica que casi el doble de hombres ha lamentado haber publicado algo en las redes sociales. Mientras que el porcentaje de éstos es del 15%, el de las mujeres es del 8%.


redes sociales mujeres

http://www.ticbeat.com

El Pew Internet & American Life Project ha publicado el informe ‘Privacy Management on social media sites’, en el que muestra cómo las mujeres son más listas a la hora de gestionar la privacidad en las redes sociales. Éstas, por lo general, adoptan una postura más reservada y comparten menos datos que los hombres.

El estudio llevado a cabo por Pew Internet & American Life Project, perteneciente a la firma Pew Research Center, ha visto publicados sus resultados en el informe ‘Privacy Management on social media sites’. De éste se desprenden algunas conclusiones interesantes.

La más general es que las mujeres utilizan mejor las redes sociales a la hora de gestionar su privacidad. La investigación revela que los perfiles de Facebook, LinkedIn y MySpace del 67% de las féminas sólo los pueden ver sus amigos, mientras que únicamente el 48% de los hombres tienen esta configuración. Leer más “Las mujeres gestionan las redes sociales mejor”

INFOGRAPHIC: Privacy On Facebook Versus Google Plus Posted by Jackie


By Cohen
http://www.allfacebook.com/infographicprivacy-on-facebook-versus-google-plus-2011-10 

Which site offers more privacy, Facebook or Google Plus? A pretty good comparison between the two appears in an infographic below.

Peer One Hosting created the infographic that illustrates how neither site outdoes the other in the way of privacy.

Understanding the Laws of the Digital Jungle

Note: For the point of this piece it’s essential that I provide a disclaimer saying that I am not a lawyer or legal professional. I am simply a freelancer offering their insights and nothing I say is to be taken “as-is”. If you do have an issue, I urge you to seek assistance from a qualified legal professional.
Rights and Obligations

The web can be a scary place with the lawsuits which constantly rage on behind the scenes. While the public’s knowledge of how law affects them online can be somewhat confused, it’s important that we as service providers respect the laws which exist and ensure that we safeguard both our customers and (more importantly) ourselves. As a web designer there are several factors which do require a bit of recognition and it’s up to you as a professional to know your obligations and rights.


http://www.onextrapixel.com/2010/12/09/understanding-the-laws-of-the-digital-jungle/

While the subjects of design and development are things we regularly enjoy talking about, the issue of how law affects us as professionals doesn’t get nearly as much attention as it should do. While the web may be a place of free speech, diversity and competition there are a few constant issues which designers and developers alike need to be aware of if only to not do anything which might put them into a dispute. The aim of this article is to simply highlight the issues you may encounter.

Understanding the Laws of the Digital Jungle
Image credit: John Althouse Cohen

Note: For the point of this piece it’s essential that I provide a disclaimer saying that I am not a lawyer or legal professional. I am simply a freelancer offering their insights and nothing I say is to be taken “as-is”. If you do have an issue, I urge you to seek assistance from a qualified legal professional.

Rights and Obligations

The web can be a scary place with the lawsuits which constantly rage on behind the scenes. While the public’s knowledge of how law affects them online can be somewhat confused, it’s important that we as service providers respect the laws which exist and ensure that we safeguard both our customers and (more importantly) ourselves. As a web designer there are several factors which do require a bit of recognition and it’s up to you as a professional to know your obligations and rights.

Rights and Obligations
Image credit: crationc

Figure 1: The Internet isn’t free from the law, so beware if you break it!

Below we shall cover very briefly the types of laws that can affect you and the reasons why you need to know about it. Because law is a complicated subject you’re going to need to research the subject further and if you feel confused or worried about anything, get some proper advice from someone who’s well versed in Internet law. Hopefully the recognition of the below will give you the knowledge you need to get started and perhaps save you a lot of potential hassle in the future! Leer más “Understanding the Laws of the Digital Jungle”

The Power to Pull Prosperity

The richest, most nuanced books are also the hardest to describe. So trying to review Pull is like trying to catch the wind. Let me, nevertheless, endeavor to draw out just a few of the key lessons that resonate with me.

Flows, not stocks. Economists divide the world up into stocks and flows: think, literally, stockpiles of the many different kinds of resources, and the stuff that flows into or out of them. Arcing through Pull is the central idea that while 20th century advantage was created by hoarding stocks, 21st century advantage will be created by gaining access to richer, more intense, higher velocity flows.

Relationships, not transactions. You can buy or sell bits of stocks in isolated, arms-length exchanges. But surfing a set of flows usually requires deep, enduring, trusted relationships — because flows are like always-on sets of transactions that happen in continuous time, embedded in a social and cultural matrix.


Umair Haque

By now, you might be grudgingly inclined to agree: there’s no recovery because this isn’t just another humdrum recession. You might even be on the verge of grumblingly conceding: the Great Stagnation just might be a crisis of a set of obsolete institutions (corporations, accounts, jobs, markets, even “profit” itself), left over from the industrial age. And, perhaps, you might even be coming around to the notion that rebooting prosperity begins not with bailouts, or stimulus packages, or better leadership, but buildership: building an updated set of institutions that are a better fit with a roiling, fragile 21st century.

So now what? How do we finally get started — right here, right now, in the real world?
Every once in a while, a book comes along that blows my mind, makes me gnash my teeth and say to myself, “Wow! That’s amazing.” The last one was Gary Hamel’s epic Future of Management. The latest is The Power of Pull, by John Hagel, John Seely Brown, and Lang Davison [Obligatory disclosure: both Johns blog for HBR.org. This review was my idea, and the opinions expressed here are, obviously, my own.] Here’s why. Leer más “The Power to Pull Prosperity”

12 Ways the Tech Industry Is Screwing You (and How to Fight Back)

You can’t install the apps you want on your smartphone. You can’t play the movies you bought on your PC. You can’t even walk into a store without getting upsold, enrolled, restocked, and recalled. Welcome to the world of tech in 2010, where your phone doesn’t work–and companies tell you that “you’re holding it wrong.”

Just because you venture into the tech marketplace with a credit card in your hand doesn’t mean you deserve to get screwed. Check out these 12 ways that the tech industry is pulling a fast one on you–and learn how to fight back.
Ridiculous Restocking Fees

Bought a laptop and realized it wasn’t for you? No problem, you can return it within 30 days–that’ll be $150, please.

Restocking fees are an easy way for vendors to make a tidy profit from a consumer’s buying misstep. The rationale for such fees may be to discourage cheapskates who have no intention of keeping a device from buying it, using it for a short time–say, for the length of a vacation–and then returning it; but the practical result is that you can get slapped with a fee ranging from 10 percent to 25 percent of the purchase price just for the privilege of returning a gadget you’re not happy with.

For example, Best Buy charges 10 percent for iPhone returns; 15 percent for opened laptops, projectors, digital cameras/camcorders, and GPS systems; and 25 percent for any special-ordered item. Amazon.com, Sears, and Newegg all charge a 15 percent restocking fee for computers and electronics, though each vendor’s specific rules vary–for example, Sears charges only if the returned item doesn’t include the original packaging, whereas Newegg dings you for anything you return after opening it.

Take the restocking fees into consideration before you buy. It’s illegal in some states to charge a restocking fee without notifying you in advance, but the notification could be buried in the return policy on the back of your receipt, so ask a salesperson before you swipe your credit card. You might discover that the $5 you save by buying a product from a particular vendor could be negated by the $50 it charges as a restocking fee. Buying a gift? Get a gift card if there’s any chance that the recipient might want to return the item you’re tempted to choose.


Whether you seek out cutting-edge tech gear or keep to a strict budget, the tech industry has ways to nickel-and-dime you out of your hard-earned cash. Here’s how to fight back.

Patrick Miller, PC World

You can’t install the apps you want on your smartphone. You can’t play the movies you bought on your PC. You can’t even walk into a store without getting upsold, enrolled, restocked, and recalled. Welcome to the world of tech in 2010, where your phone doesn’t work–and companies tell you that “you’re holding it wrong.”

Just because you venture into the tech marketplace with a credit card in your hand doesn’t mean you deserve to get screwed. Check out these 12 ways that the tech industry is pulling a fast one on you–and learn how to fight back.

Ridiculous Restocking Fees

Bought a laptop and realized it wasn’t for you? No problem, you can return it within 30 days–that’ll be $150, please.

Restocking fees are an easy way for vendors to make a tidy profit from a consumer’s buying misstep. The rationale for such fees may be to discourage cheapskates who have no intention of keeping a device from buying it, using it for a short time–say, for the length of a vacation–and then returning it; but the practical result is that you can get slapped with a fee ranging from 10 percent to 25 percent of the purchase price just for the privilege of returning a gadget you’re not happy with.

For example, Best Buy charges 10 percent for iPhone returns; 15 percent for opened laptops, projectors, digital cameras/camcorders, and GPS systems; and 25 percent for any special-ordered item. Amazon.com, Sears, and Newegg all charge a 15 percent restocking fee for computers and electronics, though each vendor’s specific rules vary–for example, Sears charges only if the returned item doesn’t include the original packaging, whereas Newegg dings you for anything you return after opening it.

Take the restocking fees into consideration before you buy. It’s illegal in some states to charge a restocking fee without notifying you in advance, but the notification could be buried in the return policy on the back of your receipt, so ask a salesperson before you swipe your credit card. You might discover that the $5 you save by buying a product from a particular vendor could be negated by the $50 it charges as a restocking fee. Buying a gift? Get a gift card if there’s any chance that the recipient might want to return the item you’re tempted to choose. Leer más “12 Ways the Tech Industry Is Screwing You (and How to Fight Back)”

What’s New in Consumer Web

[Más…]

FollowStyle has entered the shopping experience market creating a hip network of fashion minded people to post their outfits, tag products and truly rate the sexiness of clothes. Pretty soon when you are shopping at a retail store you will be getting text (SMS) coupons, can take digital photos while trying things on and even have apps to make suggestions of how to look better or create a more ‘personalized’ look. How scary is that to make the clothing and fashion experience a wide open show for the web? To some that might be appealing, to others concerning. Even better, what are the retail shops going to do about this dilemma? As a corporation how do you cater to what is becoming a social media divide? Old school vs. new school.

What we learned this week about Consumer Web:

* Privacy is not sexy
* Advertising standards are increasing
* Mobile is the new internet


by Ellie Cachette

marijuana.leafConsumer advocacy groups seem upset with concerns about internet privacy, while research indicates the average consumer will and is sharing more information than ever if they are promised something of value in return.  Target starts selling Facebook credits gift cards and we already know how 7-11 stores are pimped out in Farmville branding. No one is talking about Foursquare anymore as all eyes were on Apple this week. On the bright side you can locate the best medicinal marijuana in your neighborhood using Weedmaps.com

Leer más “What’s New in Consumer Web”

Ready to Give up Your Consumer Data in Exchange for Bargain Deals?

We’ve had it hammered into our heads that our consumer data – where we shop, what we buy, how much we spend – should be guarded with, if not our lives, then at least every password encryption tool in our arsenals. But what if this consumer data could be harnessed to benefit both retailers and ourselves, giving us discounts on products we want, without compromising our privacy? That’s the thinking behind soon-to-be-launched WeShop, a collective shopping experience that uses aggregate consumer data to get you bargain deals on your favorite products.

The founder of WeShop, Tony Lee, believes that the recent discussions around consumer data are skewed towards scaring consumers rather than educating them:

“They understand their data belongs to them and the privacy issues, but they don’t understand the worth,” Lee says. “The people spearheading privacy debates are brilliant because they phrase the rulings around the nature of the data, rather than the value.”


Posted by Lauren Dugan

shopping We’ve had it hammered into our heads that our consumer data – where we shop, what we buy, how much we spend – should be guarded with, if not our lives, then at least every password encryption tool in our arsenals. But what if this consumer data could be harnessed to benefit both retailers and ourselves, giving us discounts on products we want, without compromising our privacy? That’s the thinking behind soon-to-be-launched WeShop, a collective shopping experience that uses aggregate consumer data to get you bargain deals on your favorite products.

The founder of WeShop, Tony Lee, believes that the recent discussions around consumer data are skewed towards scaring consumers rather than educating them:

“They understand their data belongs to them and the privacy issues, but they don’t understand the worth,” Lee says. “The people spearheading privacy debates are brilliant because they phrase the rulings around the nature of the data, rather than the value.” Leer más “Ready to Give up Your Consumer Data in Exchange for Bargain Deals?”

Pandora updates its privacy settings; encourages you to do the same.

According to the Pandora Blog, there are some new changes to the privacy settings in the ever-popular music application. While we all might love the social aspect of the site, Pandora wants to make sure that you’re on top of the latest way to keep yourself private.

From the blog:

We’ve just updated our site to make it easier for you to find and adjust your privacy settings. We thought it was important to make this adjustment to better reflect the realities of the internet today.

Right now, if you head to Pandora, you’ll catch a lovely popover message that tells you about the new changes, and encourages you to check them out:


According to the Pandora Blog, there are some new changes to the privacy settings in the ever-popular music application. While we all might love the social aspect of the site, Pandora wants to make sure that you’re on top of the latest way to keep yourself private.

From the blog:

We’ve just updated our site to make it easier for you to find and adjust your privacy settings. We thought it was important to make this adjustment to better reflect the realities of the internet today.

Right now, if you head to Pandora, you’ll catch a lovely popover message that tells you about the new changes, and encourages you to check them out: Leer más “Pandora updates its privacy settings; encourages you to do the same.”