Growing Social Brand Movements (recommended post) – thnxz to @socialogilvy


We wanted to better understand how big movements get. From the Obama presidential campaigns to the global environmental initiative, Earth Hour, to high-profile brand programs like Pepsi Refresh, we benchmarked “how big is big.”  We also wanted to better understand the comparative level of engagement as measured by social actions (everything from tweets to shares to posts to views). Each of these actions reflect a higher degree of engagement from passives and while each can not be considered of equal value, we believe they can be assessed for broad comparative purposes.

A Sample of the Findings

Entertainment Phenomena, Political, Social and Brand Movements, fall into a descending order of magnitude.

Entertainment phenomena, like Justin Bieber and Gangnam Style, earn more than a billion social actions. Political campaigns, like the U.S. Presidential race garner hundreds of millions of social actions. Social and Brand Movements fall below these levels, often earning between five to ten million social actions.

View and download the white paper for the complete analysis.

When a Brand Asks for a Movement

From time to time, brand marketers want to explore what it would take to create a “movement” of some type or other around a product brand, corporate brand or issue.

Inspired by the traction that social and political movements are able to gain via the internet and social technologies, they would like to spark something big. Movements are causes that take off in some way. They become driven by the community and the activity far exceeds the investment put in by the organizer. Even popular content and memes like Harlem Shake and Gangnam Style have movement-like qualities. They seem to grow explosively with little to no management. While this is far different than a movement for a cause, it is an interesting benchmark.

Sometimes the brand desire to go “movement” is right-minded, often not. Driving movements behind product brands is hard. Often it smacks of being inauthentic or just plain selfish. A brand like TOMS Shoes’ might be an exception but I am not sure it qualifies as a movement so much as a brand with a social mission. Driving movements around brand-related issues (e.g., water conservation for a coffee brand) can be just plain hard work. It takes investment, adept behavioral economics and certainly a cause people can rally behind. Triggering mass support and action is an art and science, not to mention, a bit of luck.

Check out the white paper to see how different movements stack up and what are the winning qualities of movements that “go big.”

John Maeda: How art, technology and design inform creative leaders | Video on TED.com


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

TED Talks John Maeda, President of the Rhode Island School of Design, delivers a funny and charming talk that spans a lifetime of work in art, design and technology, concluding with a picture of creative leadership in the future.

See on www.ted.com

Cinco formas que adquieren las decisiones grupales


manuelgross.bligoo.com

Enviado por Manuel Gross
Manuel Gross

1348315092954-group_decision.jpg

Algunas formas de tomar decisiones en las reuniones

Por Visi Serrano. 

Uvedevisi. 

Vengo de dinamizar un taller sobre Dirección de Reuniones (#bestmeetingsy hemos conversado y debatido sobre lo que ocurre en las reuniones a la hora de decidir entre varias alternativas, soluciones o propuestas.

 

Decidir o no decidir he ahi la cuestion

Es conveniente aclarar primeramente que cuando nos reunimos para tomar una decisión profesional, el facilitador o responsable de la reunión debería no hacerse trampa en el solitario y tener en cuenta:

  • que si la decisión está ya tomada, la reunión debería ser meramente informativa.
  • que si quien facilita no otorga de autoridad al equipo y no va asumir la decisión tomada como suya, más vale aclarar al grupo que se va a realizar una consulta al respecto para conocer su opinión acerca del tema dado.

Todo ello ahorraría tiempo a todos y no fomentaría la desconfianza provocada por el engaño que a la larga siempre es detectado por el grupo de participantes.

1. Los guerrilleros o Decisión tomada por la formación de subgrupos que negocian antes de reunirse

Varios miembros del grupo se comprometen de antemano y de manera previa a la reunión a tomar una decisión determinada.

Aún suponiendo que dicha decisión fuera buena para la mayoría, tales convenios que manipulan las reuniones de toma de decisiones, afectan a la generación y mantenimiento de la cohesión del grupo y de la confianza recíproca de sus participantes..

2. Los estrategas o Decisión tomada por las minorías del grupo más activas:

En dicho tipo de decisión uno o varios miembros del grupo provocan situaciones estratégicas muy rápidamente, que hacen desembocar al grupo reunido en una decisión precipitada. El resto del grupo “se siente” atropellado, en general, no siente como propia la decisión tomada, generalmente descubre la táctica pero quizá no se atreven a descubrirla y raramente se implicará en el compromiso que suponga la decisión. Leer más “Cinco formas que adquieren las decisiones grupales”

Are You Creating Disgruntled Employees?


You can’t make every worker happy, surely, and should a business even try? Evidence from our recent research suggests, actually, that the answer is yes. Or rather, our evidence shows that managers are giving up far too soon on their disgruntled employees, making them less productive than they could be, exposing their companies to unnecessary risks from thefts and leaks in the process, and inflating turnover costs.

What causes employees to become disgruntled and what can be done to prevent it? To find out we zeroed in on the most unhappy people in our data. These were 6% in our database of 160,576 employees who displayed the lowest levels of job satisfaction and commitment on their 360 evaluations of their bosses. We were looking for those among them whose managers also oversaw the most satisfied employees. In this way we identified that group of leaders who were managing both the very unhappy and the very happy at the same time. Leer más “Are You Creating Disgruntled Employees?”

El lingüista Noam Chomsky elaboró la lista de las “10 Estrategias de Manipulación” a través de los medios…

La estrategia de la distracción es igualmente indispensable para impedir al público interesarse por los conocimientos esenciales, en el área de la ciencia, la economía, la psicología, la neurobiología y la cibernética. ”Mantener la Atención del público distraída, lejos de los verdaderos problemas sociales, cautivada por temas sin importancia real. Mantener al público ocupado, ocupado, ocupado, sin ningún tiempo para pensar; de vuelta a granja como los otros animales (cita del texto ‘Armas silenciosas para guerras tranquilas)”.


Extractado del perfil de facebook de
Marcelo Moreyra

1. La estrategia de la distracción

El elemento primordial del control social es la estrategia de la distracción que consiste en desviar la atención del público de los problemas importantes y de los cambios decididos por las élites políticas y económicas, mediante la técnica del diluvio o inundación de continuas distracciones y de informaciones insignificantes.

La estrategia de la distracción es igualmente indispensable para impedir al público interesarse por los conocimientos esenciales, en el área de la ciencia, la economía, la psicología, la neurobiología y la cibernética. ”Mantener la Atención del público distraída, lejos de los verdaderos problemas sociales, cautivada por temas sin importancia real. Mantener al público ocupado, ocupado, ocupado, sin ningún tiempo para pensar; de vuelta a granja como los otros animales (cita del texto ‘Armas silenciosas para guerras tranquilas)”.
Leer más “El lingüista Noam Chomsky elaboró la lista de las “10 Estrategias de Manipulación” a través de los medios…”

Why Can’t Big Companies Solve Big Problems?

In fact, it’s that very question: “What is the question?” that seems to be the nub of the problem these days. In an increasingly turbulent and interconnected world, the ambiguity that surrounds us is rising to unprecedented levels. And that’s a serious problem that our current systems can’t handle. Fighting terrorism, fixing healthcare and restarting the economy aren’t just complex problems — they’re highly ambiguous ones.

It turns out that while large companies and organizations are phenomenally good at managing complexity, they’re actually quite bad at tackling ambiguity. A complicated problem is like playing a game of chess, an ambiguous problem is like having your in-laws over to dinner for the first time. In the latter situation, it’s not the number of variables that kills you. It’s what you don’t know that you don’t know.


By Edward Liu
http://www.fastcodesign.com/1662575/what-cant-big-companies-solve-big-problems

I completely agree. As a employee of a large conglomerate, I have fought hard to avoid becoming another cog in the system. The mentality is very conservative – that’s one part of the problem and it’s primarily due to the demographics of the company. At the same time, the great irony of being a large company and unable to fight large problems comes from the very political nature of a large company. Multiple “leaders” within the organization have their own agenda/goals. And when they all want different things, of course, it does not translate exactly into progress.

Utlimately, it’s true that it is the major leaders such as the CEO or Board of Directors which must make the right stand and not only encourage but ensure that hybrid thinking & solutions is implemented. However, going back to the demographics, it seems that unfortunately the inherent difficulties could mean that this may not happen for at least another generation. Let’s hope it is sooner than later. Leer más “Why Can’t Big Companies Solve Big Problems?”

Mars appoints OMD Taiwan following month of pitches


TAIPEI – OMD Taiwan has been appointed to the media business for Mars following a month-long competitive pitch against Mindshare and incumbent Dentsu Media Palette.

Mars appoints OMD Taiwan following month of pitches

OMD will be handling both traditional and online media for Mars, effective immediately.

“During the pitch process, OMD Taiwan impressed us with their positive energy and stellar presentation,” said Yin Wei Lee, commercial head of Mars Taiwan.

According to a company statement, Mars generates global sales of US$28 billion annually across six business segments, including chocolate, petcare, Wrigley gum and confections, food, drinks and symbioscience. Leer más “Mars appoints OMD Taiwan following month of pitches”

The crowdsourcing dilemma: the idea with the most votes isn’t always the best idea

You might wonder, with great anti-biasing technology, why wouldn’t the idea with the most votes always be the best idea? There are all sorts of reasons: a great idea might have been entered relatively late in the crowdsourcing process or the submitter might have given it a non-compelling title, for example. But by looking at implicit data, as well as explicit data, (that is looking at how the crowd interacts with ideas and not just at the hard data like votes), you can identify other indicators for ideas that are truly merit worthy, despite not getting the most votes, or even a lot of votes. You may not be able to immediately tell if the “underdog” idea is in fact a better idea, but you can provide it with more visibility within the crowd so that you can do an apples-to-apples comparison with the big vote getting ideas.

Here are some of the things we do, and suggest others do, to ensure a reliable, accurate outcome, and avoid the “popularity contest” syndrome:

* Multiple idea order display – Display ideas in a variety of ways, such as most recent, most discussed and most active for example, and don’t just default to listing the top voted ideas.
* Zero-start finalist round – Use a finalist round to allow the entire crowd to focus on just a few ideas which all show signs of being superior ideas, and start all finalists at zero votes.
* Weighted voting – give insider experts, your panel, or more long-time active members more vote weight… you’ll find these people are highly motivated to filter the best not just the popular to the top


Randy Corke| http://www.chaordix.com/blog

One of the common complaints about crowdsourcing is that it can become a popularity contest: the idea that gets the most early votes rises to the top of the list, therefore gets more views, and therefore more votes and becomes the winner. And, unfortunately, for many so-called “crowdsourcing” sites, this is true. You see it on sites like Digg – get enough early “diggs” for your submission to get on the “top news” list and your submission can get visibility for a long time.

We work hard to surface the best quality results for our clients from their crowdsourcing projects, so as you would expect, we have developed ways to avoid this “early vote” bias and other forms of bias. But even with great design and planning, the best technology and the right methodology, you can’t completely eliminate the possibility of a less-worthy idea getting the most votes. However, it IS possible to use analysis and crowd management techniques to ensure that other highly worthy ideas can be identified, so that the chances of truly finding the best idea are maximized.

Leer más “The crowdsourcing dilemma: the idea with the most votes isn’t always the best idea”

Reveladoras declaraciones sobre lo que ocurrió en la Casa Blanca el 11-S


President George W. Bush with U.S. Secretary o...

El próximo sábado se cumple el noveno aniversario

Las declaraciones las realizó la ex asesora de seguridad Condoleezza Rice, en una entrevista que todavía no se publicó

La ex secretaria de estado nacional estadounidense Condoleezza Rice le prohibió de manera tajante al presidente George W. Bush volver a Washington tras los atentados del 11 de septiembre de 2001, según cuenta la propia Rice en una entrevista radial.

En la conversación, que será emitidacon motivo del noveno aniversario de los atentados contra el World Trade Center en Nueva York, la entonces secretaria señala que ordenó a Bush que se quedara en Florida para después colgar el teléfono.

“El presidente estaba bastante molesto conmigo, para decirlo de manera diplomática”, añade Rice. Su actitud, sin embargo, se debió a que nadie sabía qué podía pasar y a que la Casa Blanca podía ser objetivo de un atentado, agrega.

“Conozco al presidente desde hace mucho tiempo y sabía que no quería otra cosa que estar en su sitio y tomar el mando”, cuenta también Rice, que ocupó entre 2005 y 2009 el puesto de secretaria de Estado.  Leer más “Reveladoras declaraciones sobre lo que ocurrió en la Casa Blanca el 11-S”

Fight The System: Battling Bureaucracy

With the odds stacked so high against them, I am surprised in-house Web teams get anything done at all. Their success depends as much on their ability to navigate politics and bureaucracy as it does on their skills as designers and developers.

But do not despair. I can tell you from the over-subscription to workshops I have run on the subject that you are not alone. This is a universal problem and one that can be overcome, as I will outline in this post.

Our Web design agency specializes in complex projects. During my time there, I have developed certain techniques that will hopefully help others keep their Web projects moving.


If you work as part of an in-house Web team, you have my sympathy. If that in-house team is within a large organization, then doubly so. Being part of an in-house Web team sucks. Trust me, I know. I worked at IBM for three years and now spend most of my days working alongside battle-weary internal teams.

SM1-20100805-170827 in Fight The System: Battling Bureaucracy
Web designer trying to hang himself.

It’s hardly surprising that most in-house teams are worn down and depressed. They face almost insurmountable challenges:

  • Departmental feuds
    Too often, a website becomes a battleground for pre-existing departmental conflicts. Political power plays can manifest themselves in fights over home page real estate or conflicts over website ownership. After all, is the website an IT function or a marketing tool?
  • Uninformed decision-makers
    Rarely does an internal Web team have the authority to make final decisions on a website. Instead decision-making happens higher up in the organization. Unfortunately, although these individuals have more authority, they do not have greater knowledge of the Web. Decision-making is often based more on personal opinion than the needs of users or business objectives.
  • Committees
    Committees are the curse of larger organizations. The bigger the organization, the more the number of people who want their say, and that leads to committees. Unfortunately, committees inevitably lead to compromise and design-on-the-fly. Both are the kiss of death to any Web project.
  • An inward perspective
    Becoming institutionalized is very easy in a large organization. Eventually you speak an internal language and think in terms of organizational structure. This proves problematic when communicating to end users. Not only do most large organizations have their own internal perspective of the world, some individuals even think departmentally, further aggravating departmental conflict.
  • Endless scope creep
    When an in-house Web team is constantly available, calling on their help is easy. This is both a benefit and a curse. The truth is that many Web teams are taken for granted, and websites that should never exist are built and launched because there are no constraints. Worse still, good projects can be drowned as “internal clients” keep demanding additional functionality that the Web team cannot block.
  • Problem people
    The bigger the organization, the higher the chance they will hire a jerk. If you work for a large organization, I can pretty much guarantee you have someone in mind as you read this. These people can really hinder the work of the Web team and prevent a website from reaching its full potential.
  • Glacially slow progress
    With endless red tape and painful committees, getting stuff done in a large institution can be nearly impossible. It is not unusual for projects to grind to a halt entirely because they become dependant on other systems or projects yet to be implemented. I have even seen something as simple as the roll-out of a content management system take years to implement. Leer más “Fight The System: Battling Bureaucracy”

Fidel Castro reapareció en un acto masivo en La Habana


INTERNACIONALES

El ex presidente cubano Fidel Castro volvió a advertir sobre el riesgo de una guerra nuclear en el planeta, en su primera alocución pública luego de que en 2006 se alejara del poder por problemas de salud.

El líder revolucionario se presentó este viernes ante una multitud en las escalinatas de la universidad de La Habana con su uniforme verde oliva y gorra, y leyó un discurso de unos 50 minutos a la población, reseñó Ansa. Leer más “Fidel Castro reapareció en un acto masivo en La Habana”

When Crowdsourcing Goes Wrong

There are lots of success stories about crowdsourcing out there, but unfortunately, there are also a fair number about crowdsourcing failures. Recently I’ve read about or heard about some perceived failures, in particular the Pepsi Refresh Challenge and the Mad Men Casting Call, which have motivated me to write about why some crowdsourcing goes wrong. Naturally, we don’t like to talk about the failures; we’d much rather say all crowdsourcing projects provide benefit…


The crowdsourcing process in eight steps.
Image via Wikipedia

Randy Corke

There are lots of success stories about crowdsourcing out there, but unfortunately, there are also a fair number about crowdsourcing failures.   Recently I’ve read about or heard about some perceived failures, in particular the Pepsi Refresh Challenge and the Mad Men Casting Call, which have motivated me to write about why some crowdsourcing goes wrong.  Naturally, we don’t like to talk about the failures; we’d much rather say all crowdsourcing projects provide benefit… Leer más “When Crowdsourcing Goes Wrong”

Digital Influence Ogilvy Exchange on Government

Next month, the Digital Influence team will be partnering with others at Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide to bring you an Ogilvy Exchange on Government. The working title of the event: How Social Media Tools are Shaping Government, the 2010 Elections and Issue Campaigns.

In 2008, the Obama administration swept into the White House in large part transported on the wings of the Netroots – the fundraising and voter mobilization of his online supporters was unprecedented. With this administration came the ideals of the Open Gov Directive and Gov 2.0: transparent, participatory government. Two years later we can’t help but ask the following questions:

What happened to the momentum?

Does it still exist?

How has it evolved?

Are these ideals being fulfilled in government?

What are some of the best, innovative case studies of what is possible in this space?

What does the future hold?

What do the Administration, the media and the campaign stakeholders think is next for 2010 and 2012?

How is the next generation of political advocates going to bring together social media to create a movement, to raise money, to organize locally, to fight opposition campaigns and to get out the vote?

Will the Republicans be able to capitalize on this power as well as the Democrats?

We realize that this topic is vast and one that will take several conversations to cover. Consequently, we are hopeful that this Ogilvy Exchange will be the first of many where we begin to discuss these questions. In parallel, the 360Di team is launching a series of blog posts on government that we hope to publish on a weekly basis to continue to explore this topic in a more thorough manner.


Next month, the Digital Influence team will be partnering with others at Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide to bring you an Ogilvy Exchange on Government. The working title of the event: How Social Media Tools are Shaping Government, the 2010 Elections and Issue Campaigns.

In 2008, the Obama administration swept into the White House in large part transported on the wings of the Netroots – the fundraising and voter mobilization of his online supporters was unprecedented. With this administration came the ideals of the Open Gov Directive and Gov 2.0: transparent, participatory government. Two years later we can’t help but ask the following questions:

What happened to the momentum?

Does it still exist?

How has it evolved?

Are these ideals being fulfilled in government?

What are some of the best, innovative case studies of what is possible in this space?

What does the future hold?

What do the Administration, the media and the campaign stakeholders think is next for 2010 and 2012?

How is the next generation of political advocates going to bring together social media to create a movement, to raise money, to organize locally, to fight opposition campaigns and to get out the vote?

Will the Republicans be able to capitalize on this power as well as the Democrats?

We realize that this topic is vast and one that will take several conversations to cover. Consequently, we are hopeful that this Ogilvy Exchange will be the first of many where we begin to discuss these questions. In parallel, the 360Di team is launching a series of blog posts on government that we hope to publish on a weekly basis to continue to explore this topic in a more thorough manner. Leer más “Digital Influence Ogilvy Exchange on Government”

Staying Motivated Through the Years

A reader once asked me a very interesting question–how do I stay motivated long-term when I don’t receive any raises or benefits as a freelancer? This got me thinking hard–just how do I keep myself motivated?

I was never really lucky enough to have a job with good benefits, bonuses or raises, so maybe the lack of these things doesn’t bother me as much as someone who did have them at a full-time job. Or, perhaps it’s because I feel like I do receive all of these benefits–and more.

There are tons of things that keep me motivated as a freelancer, so much so that I don’t think I would ever go back to any kind of regular job.

The trick is to reward yourself regularly for the hard work you do, much like a boss would. Here are some ways I’ve kept myself motivated through years of freelancing.


A reader once asked me a very interesting question–how do I stay motivated  long-term when I don’t receive any raises or benefits as a freelancer? This got me thinking hard–just how do I keep myself motivated?

I was never really lucky enough to have a job with good benefits, bonuses or raises, so maybe the lack of these things doesn’t bother me as much as someone who did have them at a full-time job. Or, perhaps it’s because I feel like I do receive all of these benefits–and more.

There are tons of things that keep me motivated as a freelancer, so much so that I don’t think I would ever go back to any kind of regular job.

The trick is to reward yourself regularly for the hard work you do, much like a boss would. Here are some ways I’ve kept myself motivated through years of freelancing.

Leer más “Staying Motivated Through the Years”

Neutralidad de la red: los usuarios tendremos que defendernos solos

Hipotecar la Internet del futuro a cambio de un compromiso de las operadoras es, simplemente, una estupidez. La permanente innovación y las leyes del mercado han asegurado en todo momento que las supuestas capacidades limitadas de las redes móviles y la rentabilidad del negocio de las operadoras no estuviesen en ningún momento en peligro: están amenazando a los gobiernos con argumentos falsos, con faroles de jugador de poker. Que Google colabore en algo así no hace más que dar la razón a sus críticos. La historia dirá hasta qué punto tenía Google que haberse metido en un acuerdo así, y qué beneficios le ha reportado.

¿La buena noticia, si es que puede haberla? Que se trata de un acuerdo entre compañías, que la FCC y los reguladores pueden ignorar completamente a la hora de dictar sus normas. Que si el nivel de protesta de los ciudadanos y organizaciones es suficientemente elevado, es posible que aún podamos defendernos solos. Que buena falta nos va a hacer.


El acuerdo entre Google y Verizon presentado ayer pone las cosas claras: Google no es para nada un “abogado defensor” de los usuarios ni defiende en modo alguno una Internet abierta y neutral. Es simplemente una empresa dispuesta a lo que haga falta por incrementar sus beneficios.

El contenido del acuerdo es claro: accedemos a mantener los principios de la neutralidad de la red en la Internet de hoy, a cambio de vender nuestros principios en la Internet de mañana. Una auténtica hipoteca que permite a las operadoras vulnerar la neutralidad en los cada vez más populares servicios móviles, bloquear lo que deseen bloquear y privilegiar lo que les venga en gana privilegiar, así como desarrollar una “Internet para ricos” en la que este principio regulador y director de lo que ha sido la Red hasta ahora no tenga la menor importancia. Aplicando una cita de Groucho Marx,  “estos son mis principios: si no le gustan, tengo otros“. Leer más “Neutralidad de la red: los usuarios tendremos que defendernos solos”