Pizza Hut And Amex Team Up on Foursquare for Super Bowl

While a compelling marketing innovation, the Foursquare initiative appears to be but a small piece to Pizza Hut’s larger efforts for Super Bowl XLVI. For instance, the Plano, TX-based brand will run a pre-game ad on NBC. The spot is the result of a user-generated video contest on the brand’s Facebook page that concluded on Jan. 15.

Interestingly, on the social media front, the Yum! Brands property has neither authored a Facebook post to its 5.5 million fans/likes nor tweeted to its 83,000 Twitter followers about the Foursquare offer. Because of Pizza Hut’s current $10 deal for any kind of pizza, Amex users would stand to buy pies from the chain for roughly $5 apiece – after the $5 credit is applied.

The Super Bowl is in three days. Not surprisingly, the brand’s community managers have published numerous messages about Sunday’s huge TV event in which it will participate.

For all the marketing community’s interest in Foursquare, Pizza Hut’s lack of attention to the deal offer so far seems to speak volumes about where geo-social truly stands in the real-world pecking order of advertising . In other words, platforms at reasonable scale like Facebook (845 million users) and Twitter (100 million) are welcome in King TV’s court. New York-based Foursquare, with its 15 million users, appears to be still working towards such an invite.


Will football fans check in via Foursquare on Super Bowl Sunday? American Express and Pizza Hut plan to find out, offering a $5 rebate on any food order from the pizza chain that exceeds $10. While aimed at Super Bowl XLVI viewers, the discount and three-company partnership will run through Feb. 12.

Here is why it’s interesting for Pizza Hut. Foursquare users don’t have to check in at any of Pizza Hut’s 6,000 restaurants. Whenever Amex members check in to the geo-social app’s “Super Swarm Sunday” feature created for the big game, they will receive a statement credit after ordering from Pizza Hut online, by phone, or in stores.

They have to pay with their Amex cards, which need to be synced up to their Foursquare acounts. Then, Foursquare will send them an alert about the money-back reward within moments after the Pizza Hut purchase.

Foursquare’s Challenge Leer más “Pizza Hut And Amex Team Up on Foursquare for Super Bowl”

YouGov Names Top Food/Beverage Brands

With summer in full swing, the buzz scores of beverage brands are also hot, driven by consumer need to quench their thirst. Overall in 2010, however, Ritz remains the most popular snack brand, and Subway steals the spotlight as the quick service restaurant that offers the most value to consumers, according to market research firm YouGov.

The Brandweek BrandIndex Report by YouGov is a weekly consumer perception report that analyzes the most talked about brands based on buzz: The scores are based on weighing positive and negative perceptions of a brand. A +100 score is positive, a -100 score is negative, and a rating of zero means that the score is neutral. This week’s report also measures brands based on value.

YouGov interviews 5,000 people each weekday from a representative U.S. population sample. Respondents are drawn from an online panel of 1.5 million individuals.

Hot Weather Equals Hot Brands
Record July heat played right into the hands of savvy marketers. For the second month in a row, beverage brands dominated the rankings of the most improved buzz scores.

In July, four of the top 10 brands made up this sector: Country Time Lemonade, V8 juices, Crystal Light (a repeat winner), and Bacardi.

On the dining front, both Quiznos—which launched a new campaign featuring singing cats—and Long John Silver landed on the chart as well.


With summer in full swing, the buzz scores of beverage brands are also hot, driven by consumer need to quench their thirst. Overall in 2010, however, Ritz remains the most popular snack brand, and Subway steals the spotlight as the quick service restaurant that offers the most value to consumers, according to market research firm YouGov.

The Brandweek BrandIndex Report by YouGov is a weekly consumer perception report that analyzes the most talked about brands based on buzz: The scores are based on weighing positive and negative perceptions of a brand. A +100 score is positive, a -100 score is negative, and a rating of zero means that the score is neutral. This week’s report also measures brands based on value.

YouGov interviews 5,000 people each weekday from a representative U.S. population sample. Respondents are drawn from an online panel of 1.5 million individuals.

Hot Weather Equals Hot Brands
Record July heat played right into the hands of savvy marketers. For the second month in a row, beverage brands dominated the rankings of the most improved buzz scores.

In July, four of the top 10 brands made up this sector: Country Time Lemonade, V8 juices, Crystal Light (a repeat winner), and Bacardi.

On the dining front, both Quiznos—which launched a new campaign featuring singing cats—and Long John Silver landed on the chart as well.

Charting A Shift from Communications to Engagements

The nature of advertising and branding is changing.

The dictionary definition of advertising, “the act or practice of calling public attention to one’s product, service, need, etc.” is starting to feel pretty quaint. In fact, even the term “advertising” is starting to feel off the mark.

In all honesty, marketing is starting look a lot less like marketing communications and a lot more like service design. So to put a stake in the ground, I propose that a more accurate description of modern advertising is “engagement design.” My definition, (heavily based off Live | Work’s definition of service design) is “the design of [branded] experiences that add value through many different touch-points over time.” The culmination of these experiences creates a “brand,” the general impression left with a consumer.

engagement design_rev

What does that mean? The old advertising model, the one predicated on message dissemination, was designed to use multiple touchpoints to convey an idea about a brand. In that model, a brand positioning is planned and communicated through repetition, creativity and ubiquity. That’s not what we’re talking about here.


The nature of advertising and branding is changing.

The dictionary definition of advertising, “the act or practice of calling public attention to one’s product, service, need, etc.” is starting to feel pretty quaint.  In fact, even the term “advertising” is starting to feel off the mark.

In all honesty, marketing is starting look a lot less like marketing communications and a lot more like service design.  So to put a stake in the ground, I propose that a more accurate description of modern advertising is “engagement design.”  My definition, (heavily based off Live | Work’s definition of service design) is “the design of [branded] experiences that add value through many different touch-points over time.”  The culmination of these experiences creates a “brand,” the general impression left with a consumer.

engagement design_rev

What does that mean?  The old advertising model, the one predicated on message dissemination, was designed to use multiple touchpoints to convey an idea about a brand.  In that model, a brand positioning is planned and communicated through repetition, creativity and ubiquity. That’s not what we’re talking about here. Leer más “Charting A Shift from Communications to Engagements”