IRIS Camera Concept Could One Day Let You Take Photos by Blinking


By KEITH WAGSTAFF | @kwagstaff | http://techland.time.com

Imagine a viewfinder that follows your eye, focuses wherever you look and then snaps a photo when you blink twice. That’s the idea behind IRIS, a new concept by Mimi Zou.

“I was thinking, ‘What’s the middle ground between the convenience of a cameraphone and the performance of a DSLR?’” says Zou, 24, who came up with IRIS as a master’s student at the Royal College of Art in London.

The camera pictured is an ideal version of what Zou hopes to build, although she has developed a slightly larger prototype that’s capable of eye-tracking and taking pictures when you blink. The biggest challenge will be moving the computing functions from her computer to the device itself.

So, what will the finished version hopefully be capable of? >>>   Leer más “IRIS Camera Concept Could One Day Let You Take Photos by Blinking”

SUMMER ‘STREET’ PHOTOGRAPHY


 

· in Photowalk. ·Valiant Light

A walk along the shore provides so much subject matter for “street” photographers.  Just like on a city street, you’ve got to have a bit of speed, a bit of luck, and be a bit brave. It’s a bit easier though than the city, as people on the beach are relaxed and playful.

Sprint

I wasn’t sure the lettering would be visible on the fire pit as the sky was extremely bright. The Fuji Xpro pulled through. Shots like this are a quick camera up, camera down, as you certainly don’t want to spend too much time composing or you’ll surely be noticed. Later I realized no one was really bothering to look my way. I felt brave at the time though. Leer más “SUMMER ‘STREET’ PHOTOGRAPHY”

Modelo de presencia digital por objetivos


 

titonet.com
Titonet

Creo que hemos llegado a un momento de madurez digital para intentar definir la presencia de una empresa con una cierta metodología. Hace unos meses hice un acercamiento al intentar definir la identidad digital, pero creo que se puede profundizar más. Hoy me gustaría abordar la presencia digital desde la perspectiva de las necesidades del área de marketing.

En el momento en que un responsable de marketing debe definir la presencia digital de una marca, la puede abordar a través de diferentes  perspectivas:

  1. Enfoque de Público. Lo importante es estar donde esté el máximo número de mis consumidores y por ello se priorizan aquellas plataformas más afines. Es un enfoque clásico de medios. El problema puede darse si hay consumidores fuera de tu target de comunicación. (ver más en conocemos a nuestro target)
  2. Enfoque de Competencia. Lo importante es cubrir aquello que hace mi competencia más directa. “No es posible que ellos estén en Facebook con tantos fans y yo con tan pocos”. Es un enfoque reactivo, pero nadie ha dicho que no sea válido.
  3. Enfoque de lo último y lo que más mola. Pinterest es genial y tengo que estar sí o sí. Esta opción suele darse cuando delegas la definición de la presencia digital en tu agencia de publicidad. Lo importante es conseguir la noticia, ser el primero; lo táctico se convierte en estratégico.
  4. Enfoque de objetivos a conseguir: Tengo claro lo que quiero y aquellos lugares que me lo proporcionan.

  Leer más “Modelo de presencia digital por objetivos”

Spencer Tunick: On Stealing Cameras, Controversy, and Kickstarter

Flanders 2 (Gaasbeek Castle, Belgium) 2011 © Spencer Tunick
Who doesn’t know Spencer Tunick? Over the past two decades, the artist has photographed more than 100,000 nudes of all ages and persuasions on all seven continents. His large-scale projects, which he calls installations, continuously gather the attention of the world press and sometimes change the lives of the liberated participants.
The subject of two HBO films — Naked States and Naked World — and one-time “Man of the Year” in Chile, Tunick has raised awareness of environmental issues, including the melting icecaps in Switzerland and the evaporation of the Dead Sea in Israel, while also having fun with naked bodies and props.


by Paul Laster | http://the99percent.com

Flanders 2 (Gaasbeek Castle, Belgium) 2011 © Spencer Tunick
Who doesn’t know Spencer Tunick? Over the past two decades, the artist has photographed more than 100,000 nudes of all ages and persuasions on all seven continents. His large-scale projects, which he calls installations, continuously gather the attention of the world press and sometimes change the lives of the liberated participants.
The subject of two HBO films — Naked States and Naked World — and one-time “Man of the Year” in Chile, Tunick has raised awareness of environmental issues, including the melting icecaps in Switzerland and the evaporation of the Dead Sea in Israel, while also having fun with naked bodies and props.
aurillac_550
Aurillac 1 (France) 2010 © Spencer Tunick
What was your motivation for first picking up a camera?
I’m a fourth generation photographer. My great grandfather was a photographer and owned the first Kodak photo finishing plant in downtown New York, where the World Trade Center was later located. My grandfather was a photographer for the United Nations Council on Foreign Relations, where he photographed Truman, Eisenhower, DeGaulle, Castro, Tito, JFK, and countless other diplomats and world leaders. And my dad had photo concessions in several Catskill Hotels in the 1960s and ‘70s — selling pictures of guests in keychain viewers. I often worked for him for free and when he retired at an early age, he gave me all of his cameras.
brugge_550
Brugge 1, 2005 © Spencer Tunick
How did you start photographing nudes in public places?
After attending Emerson College in Boston, I moved to a storefront in NY‘s East Village that I rented from the surf and music photographer Justin Jay. I took a one-year program at the International Center for Photography and became interested in photography that documented performance art and took some sculpture and painting classes at SVA. I couldn’t find myself so I realized that I would have to satisfy my dreams of people floating naked through the city at sunrise with photography.

I discovered George Holz, a commercial photographer who shot nudes that I liked, and decided to intern with him. I basically stole his camera, not literally, but I bought the same camera and lens that he used — a set-up that allowed the subject to be sharp and the background blown out of focus. You can have an idea, but you have to find the materials to manifest it — you have to buy the right canvas or clay. In my world I had to get the right camera to do what I wanted to do.

Sometime in 1990, I was walking down the street and saw a guy who looked absolutely amazing (he turned out to be Alistair Butler, a Robert Mapplethorpe model and Alvin Ailey dancer) and I said, “Trust me, even though I don’t have any pictures to show, I could take a wonderful photograph of you,” and he did. I photographed him on Wall Street, which was my first public nude image. Leer más “Spencer Tunick: On Stealing Cameras, Controversy, and Kickstarter”

Get Inspired by 45 Good Looking Slideshows in Web Design

With the use of these sliders, the people and companies behind these websites get a unique way of getting a more professional look and showing off more content at the same time. With these sliders they’re able to highlight featured content and more.


By: Hilde Torbjornsen
http://www.onextrapixel.com/2010/11/01/get-inspired-by-45-good-looking-slideshows-in-web-design/

With the use of these sliders, the people and companies behind these websites get a unique way of getting a more professional look and showing off more content at the same time. With these sliders they’re able to highlight featured content and more.

45 Clever and Good-Looking Sliders

Esteban Munos
Esteban Munos

Graffino
Graffino

Online Portfolio of Martyn Palmer
Online portfolio of Martyn Palmer

Verdeo
Verdeo

SlideDeck
SlideDeck

Violet
Violet Leer más “Get Inspired by 45 Good Looking Slideshows in Web Design”

20 Creative Examples of Forced Perspective Photography

You don’t always have to use Photoshop to create optical illusions in your photographs. With a technique called forced perspective you can create illusions that make an object appear farther away, closer, larger or smaller than it actually is. It just takes a little creativity with the placement of the subjects in the shot and the camera angle. To give you some inspiration, here are 20 Creative Examples of Forced Perspective Photography.


Henry Jones | //webdesignledger.com

You don’t always have to use Photoshop to create optical illusions in your photographs. With a technique called forced perspective you can create illusions that make an object appear farther away, closer, larger or smaller than it actually is. It just takes a little creativity with the placement of the subjects in the shot and the camera angle. To give you some inspiration, here are 20 Creative Examples of Forced Perspective Photography.

forced perspective photography

forced perspective photography

forced perspective photography

forced perspective photography

forced perspective photography Leer más “20 Creative Examples of Forced Perspective Photography”

Joe McNally’s Blog


  • The Foley Family

    Joe McNally
    13 Sep 2010 | 3:59 am
    All 911’s are strange now, but this one was particularly odd for me. I was in the air early in the morning, flying back to NYC. Clear and cool. Just like that Tuesday years ago. Manhattan was laid out in hard, shadowed relief. Still can’t get used to the missing piece of the skyline. Went from the airport to Ladder 9 on Great Jones St. It is where I have gone every 911 morning for 9 years. Saw John Baldassare, the first NY firefighter to step in front of the giant Polaroid camera. His was the first portrait in a project that came to be known as Faces of Ground Zero. Checked in…
  • I Second That!

    Joe McNally
    5 Sep 2010 | 5:58 am
    A couple of indispensable blogs were posted this week. First, John Loengard’s guest blog on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider. This I would suggest as a must read for photographers and picture editors alike. Tremendous economic pressures over time have fractured and adversely affected the historic and important relationship good picture editors have with the photographers they employ. This post, and John’s well reasoned and direct advocacy for the role of the photog in the world of publications, is very well taken. The other is up on Strobist. Greg Heisler burst onto the…
  • An Eye Popping Photoshop World!

    Joe McNally
    2 Sep 2010 | 4:53 pm
    I get notions, and they stay with me. One has been, for a while now, to come up with a decent portrait of Russell Brown, the wonderfully mad genius of Photoshop. Dr. Brown, as he is sometimes called, is a visual guru who combines the madcap energy of The Absent Minded Professor with an extraordinary ability to explain and teach the wilder, denser paths of that wonderfully woolly thicket known as Photoshop. The Senior Creative Director at Adobe Systems, he is also an Emmy winner for his instructional shows that explain Photoshop to the masses. When he’s in full cry, his knowledge of…
  • On LIFE, and Loengard

    Joe McNally
    30 Aug 2010 | 4:07 am
    LIFE is strange, right? And wonderful.  It is, “Life Its Own Self,” as Dan Jenkins once famously wrote. I shot my first job for the venerable picture magazine that was once everybody’s TV in 1984. Became a staff photographer in 1994. Last one in a series of 90 staffers. Now, 26 years after my first frame, I just finished another project that, I’m proud to say, goes to print sporting that famous red and white logo. Never written a guide before. Yikes. Lots of stuff to think about. There’s tons of info in it gained from 30 years out there with a camera in my hand.

http://www.joemcnally.com/blog/