Why Writing With Our Hands Is Still Important | readwrite.com


I first noticed something was off when I went to pay my rent one month. The window for a timely online transfer of funds was closing, so to get the money to my landlord in time, I’d have to do something unusual. I took out my checkbook, grabbed a pen and started writing the date.

It felt weird. My hand cramped a little, churning out numbers and letters with the slightest – but still noticeable – discomfort. My handwriting sucked. It suddenly occurred to me that I hadn’t actually written anything by hand in a long, long time. Just a few years earlier, I kept a paper journal by my bed and would buy three-packs of Moleskin notebooks for brainstorming, sketching and jotting things down. What happened?

Why Writing With Our Hands Is Still Important John Paul Titlow

Over the course of the last four or five years, several little computers have found their way into my life. Bit by bit, my professional and creative existence made the transition to an entirely digital universe. At my old job managing digital publishing for a newspaper, the iPad soon replaced my spiral notebook in meetings. Then I left the print world to work on the Internet full-time. I could even sign my freelance contracts with my finger on an iPad.

Who needed paper? Isn’t the future amazing? Look, more tweets. Wait, what was I saying?

Our Pixel-Based Lives Leer más “Why Writing With Our Hands Is Still Important | readwrite.com”

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Good vibrations – economist.com


Shattering news | economist.com

How to restore people’s voices

INJURY, disease or sheer old age mean that as many as 7% of Americans (and, presumably, a similar proportion of the population of other countries) have some kind of voice disorder caused by scarring of their vocal cords. Such scarring makes the cords stiff, and stops them producing sound in the normal way. But that could be overcome if a method were found to restore the cords’ flexibility.

Robert Langer, a pioneering biomedical engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his colleagues think they have one. They have developed a material that mimics the characteristics of natural vocal cords and could thus help restore distorted voices.

To make their new material, Dr Langer and his team took polyethylene glycol, a substance widely used in the cosmetics industry and thus known to be safe, and altered the chemical linkages between its molecules.

This allowed them to control the polymer’s viscosity and elasticity. After some trial and error, as they described on August 20th to a meeting of the American Chemical Society held in Philadelphia, they hit on a mixture which matches the traits of human vocal cords.

Laboratory tests have shown that when air is blown through a model of the vocal cords made from this material, the model responds in the way that real cords do. Leer más “Good vibrations – economist.com”

Street Art Aims to Mend a Torn Neighborhood [Updated With Video]

Though the final painted words seem like whimsy, they’re actually inspired by an exhaustive research effort, involving hundreds of the neighborhood’s 5,000 residents. Powers and a team from the Near Westside Initiative talked with upwards of 400 people in the neighborhood, in five community meetings and three days of street interviews. “When we asked people what their favorite thing about Syracuse was, the most common answer was ‘nothing,'” Powers tells Co.Design, during a break from the final painting. “And there was a seventy year old man that said he only ended up here because his car broke down on the way to New York.”


[Full article http://www.fastcodesign.com/1662238/street-art-aims-to-unite-a-torn-neighborhood ]

An exclusive look at graffiti legend ESPO’s “A Love Letter to Syracuse.”

We just got word that Samuel Macon and Faythe Levine have uploaded a beautiful video documenting the process of creating this piece. Check it out below. — Ed.

In Syracuse, New York, a hulking steel bridge divides some of city’s richest residents from some of the country‘s poorest, in the infamous Near Westside. It symbolizes everything that’s gone wrong with the city, from socioeconomic segregation to crime. “The intersection is both the major gateway in and out of the city, and the biggest barrier between the wealthiest part of the city and the poorest part,” says Maarten Jacobs, director of the Near Westside Initiative.

So Jacobs’s group, working with Syracuse University’s COLAB — a program that focuses on design collaboration — hired legendary street artist Steve Powers to repaint it. In just a couple more days, A Love Letter to Syracuse will be finished; on one side, the bridge will read “Nothing to do is everything with you,” and on the other, “I paid the light bill just to see your face,” along with “Spring Comes Summer Waits” and “Fall Leaves Winter Longs.” Leer más “Street Art Aims to Mend a Torn Neighborhood [Updated With Video]”

Philadelphia Wants $300 Business License From Bloggers Who Make No Money

By Adrianne Jeffries

WordPress.comThe city of Philadelphia is demanding money from bloggers who were honest enough to report the meagerest – $11, $50 – of revenue from ads or donations.

According to the law, any blogger who enables advertising is required to register as a business, pay for a license and pay taxes on their profits no matter how small, the Philadelphia City Paper reported last week.

hobby-blog.jpg

Philadelphia requires a license for the privilege of doing business when there is “activity for profit,” a tax attorney told the paper, even if the activity did not earn a profit the year before or may never turn a profit.

The license is $300 for a lifetime or $50 a year.

But the city only knows about the ads you’re placing on your freely-hosted blog if you report that income on your taxes.
Bloggers are just a subset of workers affected by this regressive tax. According to the city’s strict rules, any freelancer based in the city qualifies as a business and needs to get the license.


By Adrianne Jeffries <!– –>

WordPress.comThe city of Philadelphia is demanding money from bloggers who were honest enough to report the meagerest – $11, $50 – of revenue from ads or donations.

According to the law, any blogger who enables advertising is required to register as a business, pay for a license and pay taxes on their profits no matter how small, the Philadelphia City Paper reported last week.

hobby-blog.jpg

Philadelphia requires a license for the privilege of doing business when there is “activity for profit,” a tax attorney told the paper, even if the activity did not earn a profit the year before or may never turn a profit.

The license is $300 for a lifetime or $50 a year.

But the city only knows about the ads you’re placing on your freely-hosted blog if you report that income on your taxes. Leer más “Philadelphia Wants $300 Business License From Bloggers Who Make No Money”