Syrum: juego sobre red social procedente de la industria farmacéutica


sergiiglesia.blogspot.com.ar

La empresa farmacéutica Boehringer Ingelheim ha creado un juego sobre la Red Social Facebook fantástico llamado Syrum.
Cuando te registras, el juego deja el mundo en tus manos, ya que eres el responsable de encontrar el tratamiento de nuevas enfermedades y de epidemias. Para ello, tendrás varios recursos y herramientas y podrás contactar con otras personas mediante las redes sociales.
Es buen juego para educar a los pacientes y para que los profesionales del mundo sanitario conozcan productos concretos farmacéuticos.
Si quieres acceder a Syrum, haz clic aquí.

FUENTE: syrum-game.com

Boehringer Ingelheim partners with Kaggle to crowdsource scientific problem

As such, it’s working with Kaggle – which has already successfully helped companies and researchers solve problems by holding competitions with cash incentives.

PSFK reports that the crowd-sourced competition asks participants to come up with an algorithm that can predict a biological endpoint to a molecule by only knowing its structure and composition.

Contributors have until 15 June, 2012, to come up with a working model and share a prize pool of $20,000.


http://econsultancy.com/
Pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim is partnering with Kaggle, the platform that uses gamification to solve complex scientific problems, to create a new model relating to molecular development.

The company wants to use knowledge from the online scientific community to create a new model that will help its scientists accurately predict the biological response of molecules. Leer más “Boehringer Ingelheim partners with Kaggle to crowdsource scientific problem”

Medical Monday: The Power of the Tool Box – 3 Key Tools for Pharma Social Media Success

Recently, the CDC released a new resource to help health communicators utilize social media for communicating health data – the Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit. This new tool is a great asset for the public health community to establish a framework for utilizing social media.

Similar to the public health/government agency community, the pharmaceutical industry’s highly regulated nature makes similar “tool boxes” a great way for companies to keep their efforts in line with how they can and should be using social media. Here are three key “tools” that every pharmaceutical marketer should integrate into their tool box…


Recently, the CDC released a new resource to help health communicators utilize social media for communicating health data – the Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit. This new tool is a great asset for the public health community to establish a framework for utilizing social media.

Similar to the public health/government agency community, the pharmaceutical industry’s highly regulated nature makes similar “tool boxes” a great way for companies to keep their efforts in line with how they can and should be using social media. Here are three key “tools” that every pharmaceutical marketer should integrate into their tool box… Leer más “Medical Monday: The Power of the Tool Box – 3 Key Tools for Pharma Social Media Success”

Thought Leadership Success Factor No. 5: Fueling Service Innovation, Not Just Marketing

Thought leadership programs serve one master in most professional services and other B2B firms: Marketing. Marketing generates content (commissioning studies, writing white papers, and so on). Marketing packages and distributes that content (producing academic-looking publications, seminars and webinars, educational PR campaigns, email newsletters, etc.). Marketing then turns over the resulting client inquiries to account executives. Thought leadership is a Marketing activity.

But that robs thought leadership programs of their greater potential value – as sources of service innovation, not just marketing content. When companies use thought leadership to fuel new services or rejuvenate existing ones, they not only codify expertise on how to solve some business problem; they turn it into capability that many (not just a handful) of their professionals can use with clients. They do this by taking a powerful concept described in a white paper or research study and turn it into a rigorous methodology. They then develop effective curriculum around that methodology and put their professionals through training programs so they can master it.

When that happens, thought leadership content fuels new services or new approaches to existing services – not just creates client interest in them through marketing. We have seen a number of professional firms that created strong client interest in a concept after conducting and marketing some innovative research – only to find that just a few people in their firm could actually deliver the service implied by their compelling concept. (It’s a page from the “Let’s Throw Something Against the Wall and See What Sticks” book on marketing and service development. The idea is not to develop a robust service until a firm has numerous clients who are willing to pay for it.)


Bob Buday’s blog
//bloomgroup.com/blogs/bob-buday

Thought leadership programs serve one master in most professional services and other B2B firms: Marketing.  Marketing generates content (commissioning studies, writing white papers, and so on).  Marketing packages and distributes that content (producing academic-looking publications, seminars and webinars, educational PR campaigns, email newsletters, etc.).  Marketing then turns over the resulting client inquiries to account executives. Thought leadership is a Marketing activity.

But that robs thought leadership programs of their greater potential value – as sources of service innovation, not just marketing content.  When companies use thought leadership to fuel new services or rejuvenate existing ones, they not only codify expertise on how to solve some business problem; they turn it into capability that many (not just a handful) of their professionals  can use with clients.  They do this by taking a powerful concept described in a white paper or research study and turn it into a rigorous methodology.  They then develop effective curriculum around that methodology and put their professionals through training programs so they can master it.

When that happens, thought leadership content fuels new services or new approaches to existing services – not just creates client interest in them through marketing.  We have seen a number of professional firms that created strong client interest in a concept after conducting and marketing some innovative research – only to find that just a few people in their firm could actually deliver the service implied by their compelling concept.  (It’s a page from the “Let’s Throw Something Against the Wall and See What Sticks” book on marketing and service development.  The idea is not to develop a robust service until a firm has numerous clients who are willing to pay for it.)

When you think about what would happen to other industries that followed this practice, you begin to see that it’s insane.  Imagine a pharmaceutical company that conducted drug research for marketing purposes only, telling the market it’s come up with a breakthrough compound but deciding not to manufacture it.  That’s just about the state of thought leadership programs in most of the B2B firms we know.  What they publish is often not something that most of their professionals practice.

I’m not sure why this is the case.  But I know it is the case.  Perhaps it’s because service innovation in professional services is in its infancy.  Few firms have created formal and highly productive processes for developing superior services.  In most professional firms I know, services are hand-crafted by individual artisans – practicing consultants, lawyers or accountants who often in their spare time document some approach to solving a recurring client problem.
Leer más “Thought Leadership Success Factor No. 5: Fueling Service Innovation, Not Just Marketing”

Open Innovation Lessons from Big Pharma


by Stefan Lindegaard

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I often catch myself thinking that big pharma companies have serious challenges on innovation – and open innovation in particular.It must be difficult getting beyond the R&D mindset of innovation when it takes 10-15 years to be able to market a product and even harder to open up to external partners given the high level of knowledge – and thus intellectual property rights – needed. Leer más “Open Innovation Lessons from Big Pharma”