Solve the “Woman Problem” by Ending Your Stereotypes of Women

As Charles Hudson, a venture partner at SoftTechVC said yesterday on BloombergTV, investors feel safer making inherently risky bets on entrepreneurs who remind them of themselves. When the vast majority of venture firms are led by men, that’s where the money is going. Despite this, women are getting funded more often than ever before. They’re founding profitable companies which will have or have had successful exits.

She goes on to state that “Women don’t want to do startups because women want children”. She says startups are risky, require more time and women just don’t care about things like that.

Men want children just as much as women want children. This doesn’t seem to affect their career choices. As women are having children later and later in life, they have the opportunity to spend their twenties founding a startup. Even when they have children, if they have a partner who is willing to parent equally, they have the opportunity to spend their time founding a startup. Startups do require more time and risk, but women are just as free to take these chances. As more women are getting funding, the risk decreases as they can have a normal salary, benefits and many of the securities of working for a larger company.

She states that women in their twenties outearn men, so surely they can do whatever they want in their careers. Startups just aren’t for them.

Women often hit a glass ceiling in their late twenties/early thirties that their male peers don’t seem to hit. This, and not children alone, contributes to women leaving the workforce entirely or only working part time. When women don’t feel they are rewarded for their hard work – they leave. This is a problem that can and should be fixed. It is not a problem that is caused by women not caring about the work they do.


What is this? Mad Men?

http://www.cristinajcordova.com/

What is this? Mad Men?

Penelope Trunk wrote another ridiculously egregious article yesterday on VentureBeat about the “Woman Problem” in tech startups. She’s written similar posts on Techcrunch before:

Women Don’t Want to Run Tech Startups Because They’d Rather Have Children

Why Diversity is Bad for Startups

I’ve always wholeheartedly disagreed with her remarks about women in technology, but she’s continued to push her views as guest posts on several of the blogs I read. I’m actually surprised VentureBeat and Techcrunch have published her posts considering her rampant generalizations of women in tech, but unfortunately I think they find it intriguing because she’s a woman herself. Thankfully, for the women who push themselves each day as founders or early startup employees, she is utterly wrong.

Her first assumption is “If diversity was really a problem, VCs would be solving it” Leer más “Solve the “Woman Problem” by Ending Your Stereotypes of Women”

Do Job Hoppers Really Make the Best Employees? Penelope Trunk Thinks So.

In the 20th century one thing you didn’t want was a reputation as a job hopper. But in the 21st century? Penelope Trunk says it’s a different story. In a blog called Why Job Hoppers Make the Best Employees, she points to the statistics that tell us that people in their 20s change jobs approximately every 18 months. And people in their 30s change jobs frequently as well, although at a slower pace than the Gen-Yers. [Más…]

But let’s reframe this old issue. Job hoppers are not quitters, nor are they merely opportunists. Penelope argues that job-hoppers make better employees and are generally more satisfied with their work life. So if you think job-hopping is bad stuff, change your thinking.


In the 20th century one thing you didn’t want was a reputation as a job hopper.  But in the 21st centuryPenelope Trunk says it’s a different story.  In a blog called Why Job Hoppers Make the Best Employees, she points to the statistics that tell  us that people in their 20s change jobs approximately every 18 months.  And people in their 30s change jobs frequently as well, although at a slower pace than the Gen-Yers. Leer más “Do Job Hoppers Really Make the Best Employees? Penelope Trunk Thinks So.”