10 innovation experts to whom you should be listening



http://www.innovationtools.com/weblog/innovationblog-detail.asp?articleid=1218

As the publisher of the world’s largest innovation website, I have the opportunity to hear from and read the thoughts of many innovation experts. These are ten of the people whose insights have had the greatest influence on my thinking. Most of them publish articles and/or blog posts on a regular basis on the subject of innovation:

Jeffrey Phillips – Author of the Innovate on Purpose blog and the new book, Make Us More Innovative.

Steve Shapiro – Author of the 24/7 Innovation blog and the book of the same name, as well as the developer of the new Innovation Personality Poker card deck.

Jeffrey Baumgartner – Author of the excellent and frequently thought-provoking Report103 e-newsletter and founder of the JPB innovation consultancy.

Mitch Ditkoff – Creative guy extraordinaire; author of the eclectic and creative Heart of Innovation blog, the marvelous business fable Awake at the Wheel: Getting Your Great Ideas Rolling in an Uphill World and numerous creativity and idea management tools… Leer más “10 innovation experts to whom you should be listening”

Turning a Minor Innovation into a Major Innovation

John Sipe worked in an abattoir in the US in the 1920s. Like other workers there he found that he kept slipping on the wet and bloody floors. His shoes were too slippery, so he took his knife and cut thin slits across the rubber soles. He found that the shoes now gave a much better grip. In 1923 he took out a patent on the process and called it Siping with the slits called Sipes. He thought it could improve the grips of car tyres and he was right but unfortunately for him Siping was not adopted by the motor industry until the 1950s when superior tread compounds were developed that could stand up to the process.


How a Minor Innovation in One Field Can Become a Major Innovation in Another

by Paul Sloane

Turning a Minor Innovation into a Major InnovationOr, how a small idea for shoes became a big idea for cars.

Often a minor innovation in one field can become a major innovation in another field. An example is Siping.

John Sipe worked in an abattoir in the US in the 1920s. Like other workers there he found that he kept slipping on the wet and bloody floors. His shoes were too slippery, so he took his knife and cut thin slits across the rubber soles. He found that the shoes now gave a much better grip. In 1923 he took out a patent on the process and called it Siping with the slits called Sipes. He thought it could improve the grips of car tyres and he was right but unfortunately for him Siping was not adopted by the motor industry until the 1950s when superior tread compounds were developed that could stand up to the process.

On roads covered with snow, ice or water Sipes in tires significantly improve traction. A 1978 study by the US National Safety Council found that on ice Siping improved stopping distances by 22 % and rolling traction by 28%. Leer más “Turning a Minor Innovation into a Major Innovation”

Are you looking for some great readings? You just found it!

Por jabaldaia

Who is an Ethnographer? by Idris Mootee

Ethnography is hot. Many are quick to claim that they do ethnography by observing people. It is like saying anyone who drives a taxi in NY is a screenwriter. Or anyone who knows how to operate a camera can be a photojournalist

Apple iPad and Google Buzz: Harsh Reality of Innovation by Hutch Carpenter

Nothing like putting your heart and soul in an innovation, and then getting this:

Innovation tip – look for remote as well as local opportunities by Paul Sloane

Most businesses look for new opportunities in obvious places, adjacent to their current position. They typically ask two questions:

Innovation Case: Creating A World Class Innovation Unit by Stefan Lindegaard

A global and well-respected company in a fast-growing industry wants to set up a new innovation unit. Their current innovation efforts are technology-driven but there is a growing understanding that innovation efforts need to focus beyond technology and R&D.

The Golden Age of Innovation – Newsweek via Ralph-Ohr

Despite stereotypes of entrepreneurs as fresh-faced youngsters, new research has found that older workers are more likely to innovate than their under-35 counterparts.

Leadership from the Inside Out — Part II by Gary Hamel

In my previous post, I introduced you to Drew Williams. For seven years Drew served as assistant vicar at St. Andrews, an Anglican parish in Chorleywood, England. When he arrived in 2003, Drew found a church that was big but not growing, and a congregation that was loyal but not energized. Mark Stibbe, head vicar at St. Andrews, challenged Drew to develop a plan that would change this.

Watch the disruptors, not the incumbents by by Tom Hulme


10-08-00 Italy
Image by Andrea Vascellari via Flickr

Por jabaldaia

Who is an Ethnographer? by Idris Mootee

Ethnography is hot. Many are quick to claim that they do ethnography by observing people. It is like saying anyone who drives a taxi in NY is a screenwriter. Or anyone who knows how to operate a camera can be a photojournalist

Apple iPad and Google Buzz: Harsh Reality of Innovation by Hutch Carpenter

Nothing like putting your heart and soul in an innovation, and then getting this:

Innovation tip – look for remote as well as local opportunities by Paul Sloane

Most businesses look for new opportunities in obvious places, adjacent to their current position. They typically ask two questions:

Innovation Case: Creating A World Class Innovation Unit by Stefan Lindegaard

A global and well-respected company in a fast-growing industry wants to set up a new innovation unit. Their current innovation efforts are technology-driven but there is a growing understanding that innovation efforts need to focus beyond technology and R&D.

The Golden Age of Innovation – Newsweek via Ralph-Ohr

Despite stereotypes of entrepreneurs as fresh-faced youngsters, new research has found that older workers are more likely to innovate than their under-35 counterparts.

Leadership from the Inside Out — Part II by Gary Hamel

In my previous post, I introduced you to Drew Williams. For seven years Drew served as assistant vicar at St. Andrews, an Anglican parish in Chorleywood, England. When he arrived in 2003, Drew found a church that was big but not growing, and a congregation that was loyal but not energized. Mark Stibbe, head vicar at St. Andrews, challenged Drew to develop a plan that would change this.

Watch the disruptors, not the incumbents by by Tom Hulme Leer más “Are you looking for some great readings? You just found it!”

10 Good Reads on Innovation #14


By

Stefan Lindegaard

Here comes a list of 10 reads on innovation that I have enjoyed this week. I hope you will enjoy this as well. You can follow me on Twitter: @lindegaard

Connecting is the Fundamental Creative Act in Innovation by Tim Kastelle http://bit.ly/cJ8r17

Top 11 Ways to Implement a Culture of Innovation by Geoff Zoeckler http://bit.ly/9DwXYf

Four Steps to Intrapreneurship (And How to Think About the Fifth) by K. Koch, K.P. Speidel http://bit.ly/c6ju8E

Protecting IP in Collaborative Research by Zerby / Slowinski http://bit.ly/93hhqP – predictable pitfalls

25 Stretch Goals for Management by Gary Hamel http://bit.ly/c8c4fA

Why Venture Capitalists Avoid Innovation: They Like Making Money by Andy Singleton http://bit.ly/d1wpH8

Google Team Offers Lessons on Innovation, Project Management by Steve Myers http://bit.ly/cTRjM3

What’s Stopping Innovation? by Scott Anthony http://ow.ly/1iU6E – more great thoughts from Scott

Are You Prepared to Lose Control of the Idea? by Glen Stansberry http://ow.ly/1qrbAL

Adopt, Adapt, Improve and Innovate by Paul Sloane http://bit.ly/9n3n2e

http://www.15inno.com/2010/03/18/10-good-reads-on-innovation-14/

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