Why Writing With Our Hands Is Still Important | readwrite.com


I first noticed something was off when I went to pay my rent one month. The window for a timely online transfer of funds was closing, so to get the money to my landlord in time, I’d have to do something unusual. I took out my checkbook, grabbed a pen and started writing the date.

It felt weird. My hand cramped a little, churning out numbers and letters with the slightest – but still noticeable – discomfort. My handwriting sucked. It suddenly occurred to me that I hadn’t actually written anything by hand in a long, long time. Just a few years earlier, I kept a paper journal by my bed and would buy three-packs of Moleskin notebooks for brainstorming, sketching and jotting things down. What happened?

Why Writing With Our Hands Is Still Important John Paul Titlow

Over the course of the last four or five years, several little computers have found their way into my life. Bit by bit, my professional and creative existence made the transition to an entirely digital universe. At my old job managing digital publishing for a newspaper, the iPad soon replaced my spiral notebook in meetings. Then I left the print world to work on the Internet full-time. I could even sign my freelance contracts with my finger on an iPad.

Who needed paper? Isn’t the future amazing? Look, more tweets. Wait, what was I saying?

Our Pixel-Based Lives Leer más “Why Writing With Our Hands Is Still Important | readwrite.com”

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Mind Mapping


 

Educabilia - Comunidad de Aprendizaje

Fascinado con el concepto de Mind Mapping (“mapas mentales”), Leer más “Mind Mapping”

Paper Prototyping and 5 Analog Tools for Web and Mobile Designers


1stwebdesigner - Web Design Blog

Designers love analog tools. No wonder. These tools lets us physically interact with interfaces and speed up the design process, like paper prototyping. What takes hours in the digital world can be sketched out in a matter of minutes.

That’s why analog methods of prototyping are especially valuable right at the beginning of projects – when speed matters the most. Working with paper, or perhaps a whiteboard, can accelerate the speed of our learning loops. Sketch, feedback, sketch, feedback, sketch feedback – you can go through dozens of iterations in one day and you’ll set solid foundations for the rest of the work. Consider it kind of premium insurance. Getting rough feedback quickly can save you a lot of work.

No wonder, according to research by Todd Zaki Warfel, paper prototyping is still the most commonly used prototyping method! Yes, while we tend to disagree if we should code prototypes or just use prototyping software, the use of analogue tools in our design process is unquestionable! Honestly, I don’t know any designer who is not going through early stage paper prototyping sessions.

Of course in paper prototyping we pay the price of low-fidelity and while it might not be a problem for your team to discuss lo-fi deliverables, in my experience, it’s always a problem for stakeholders. To avoid misunderstandings and accusations that you’re playing with paper instead of working, just make paper prototyping an internal method for your team.

Analogue methods are supported by User Experience pioneers such as Bill Buxton, author of Sketching User Experience and Carolyn Snyder author of Paper Prototyping. They highly recommend breaking away from the computer once in a while and collaboratively work on the analog side of the design moon. According to them, paper prototyping:

  • keeps all team members motivated (as they can easily participate in paper prototyping sessions)
  • lets designers iterate quickly and gather feedback very soon in the process
  • gives designers freedom since paper has no boundaries

preview large goodprototypingbook design tools design tips design

And though many believe that the rise of tablets may end paper prototyping in the next couple of years, I’d disagree. The physical nature of paper prototyping, its speed and straight forward form (understandable by anyone), makes it unbeatable by any digital gadget. Tablet devices are just another medium of digital prototyping (perhaps better than computer, who knows…) than replacement of analog methods.

In recent years we can observe attempts to optimize paper prototyping by the creation of dedicated tools. I tried most of them and I’m addicted to some (UXPin, UI Stencils). They hugely improved my workflow. Dedicated paper prototyping tools gave me speed that exceeds everything that I tried before. I feel more professional with a well crafted notepad in hand than a crumpled piece of paper with messy sketches on it. This confidence helps me discuss my analog work both with teammates and stakeholders. Most of the tools that I present below have been around for couple of years and I guess they’re doing great.

My fingers are crossed for these brave entrepreneurs.

Have fun!

Note: At the end of article I listed some of my favourite printable templates – they are ready to use and FREE!

UXPin – Paper prototyping notepads



Popular paper prototyping notepads with an original idea. User Interface elements are printed on separate sticky notes, which let you quickly create prototypes and iterate by re-sticking parts of the interface. Additionally, notepads are equipped with a sketchbook (with printed browser/iPhone), project kick-off and personas forms, as well as diagramming, gridded, paper. Hard-covered, well-designed and beautifully crafted books are $29.99 with free DHL delivery to USA, Canada and EU, if you buy any 3 of them. Since people from Google, IBM, Microsoft use them – UXPin notepads has sort of become an industry classic.

Finished prototypes can be auto-converted into digital, HTML, wireframes by UXPin App and this is one of the coolest things I have ever seen in the User Experience Design field.

Phone Doo – Magnetic boards  Leer más “Paper Prototyping and 5 Analog Tools for Web and Mobile Designers”

Design Inspiration: Watercolor Effects

Watercolor effects are commonly used by web and graphic designers. In this post we’ll provide some inspiration by showcasing more than 40 items for your inspiration. This showcase includes some watercolor paintings as well as some examples of digital watercolor effects, and we’ll conclude the post by featuring examples of websites that make use of watercolor effects.

Using watercolor effects in your own work doesn’t have to be difficult or time consuming. Although you can certainly create your own custom graphics, using a set of watercolor brushes for Photoshop, or even a set of watercolor textures, can save you time and allow you to quickly create the effects.


http://vandelaydesign.com/blog/galleries/watercolors/Watercolor effects are commonly used by web and graphic designers. In this post we’ll provide some inspiration by showcasing more than 40 items for your inspiration. This showcase includes some watercolor paintings as well as some examples of digital watercolor effects, and we’ll conclude the post by featuring examples of websites that make use of watercolor effects. 

Using watercolor effects in your own work doesn’t have to be difficult or time consuming. Although you can certainly create your own custom graphics, using a set of watercolor brushes for Photoshop, or even a set of watercolor textures, can save you time and allow you to quickly create the effects.

Watercolor Design Inspiration

Credit: Nicole Guice

Watercolor Design Inspiration

Credit: Karen Kurycki

Watercolor Design Inspiration Leer más “Design Inspiration: Watercolor Effects”

Why Paper Is Still One of THE Most Important and Useful Design Tools You Have

(…) Abstract
http://www.freelancereview.net/

5 Cool Ways to Use Paper in Your Office

So how can you integrate paper into your workflow other than simply drawing on your desk? Here’s five suggestions:

Clip Board

A personal favorite of mine, the clip board is portable and can store extra paper. It’s where I currently do most of my sketching.

Drafting Table

If you have the room, a drafting table can be an awesome addition to your office. It’s not only a good place to draw, but oftentimes they can store your supplies and some even come with their own light source. Many have an adjustable surface as well to make time spent there as ergonomic as possible.

Electronic Paper

Smart paper systems like that from Livescribe combine the best of paper and the digital realm. Everything you write can be recorded for playback, searched and shared. The accompanying pen even comes with apps.

Easel

An easel can be a great platform for creating quick charts or wireframes but is probably not best suited for logo sketching.

Hang On Wall

What’s to stop you from tacking up a huge sheet of paper on your wall? This could be a great addition to your office, especially if you want to reference your sketches from time to time without rummaging through a messy stack of papers.
Pros and Cons of Using Paper In Design…


(…) Abstract
http://www.freelancereview.net/

5 Cool Ways to Use Paper in Your Office

So how can you integrate paper into your workflow other than simply drawing on your desk? Here’s five suggestions:

Clip Board

A personal favorite of mine, the clip board is portable and can store extra paper. It’s where I currently do most of my sketching.

Drafting Table

If you have the room, a drafting table can be an awesome addition to your office. It’s not only a good place to draw, but oftentimes they can store your supplies and some even come with their own light source. Many have an adjustable surface as well to make time spent there as ergonomic as possible.

Electronic Paper

Smart paper systems like that from Livescribe combine the best of paper and the digital realm. Everything you write can be recorded for playback, searched and shared. The accompanying pen even comes with apps.

Easel

An easel can be a great platform for creating quick charts or wireframes but is probably not best suited for logo sketching.

Hang On Wall

What’s to stop you from tacking up a huge sheet of paper on your wall? This could be a great addition to your office, especially if you want to reference your sketches from time to time without rummaging through a messy stack of papers.

Pros and Cons of Using Paper In Design… Leer más “Why Paper Is Still One of THE Most Important and Useful Design Tools You Have”

Is page reading different from screen reading?

I revise effectively both onscreen and on paper, but I revise differently on paper. I work more at a macro scale. I’m more sensitive to proportion and rhythm and timbre. I see spaces and densities better: the clumps where the prose has grown too dense, the wandering of the path where I ramble, the seams that need to be closed, the misaligned joint that I suddenly realize — yeah; there it is! — is where that paragraph from three pages ahead belongs.

As Jonah asks, Why? Is the manuscript’s physicality giving me a greater sense of physical proportion? Does the act of pressing slickened grooves into the page with my fountain pen somehow invite a corresponding mental penetration? Is the curved, flexible rigidity of five sheets in my hand sharpening my awareness of texture? Or perhaps the slowness of my pen relative to the speed of my typing favors this more structural approach — big cross outs, sections circled and moved wholesale, massive reorganizations planned with quick scribbles in the margin — over the finer-grained tweaks and cutting-and-pasting the keyboard seems to encourage.


Thanks to Maryn McKenna for tweeting David Dobbs‘s Wired article: Is page reading different from screen reading? Excerpt (but read the whole article):

I revise effectively both onscreen and on paper, but I revise differently on paper. I work more at a macro scale. I’m more sensitive to proportion and rhythm and timbre. I see spaces and densities better: the clumps where the prose has grown too dense, the wandering of the path where I ramble, the seams that need to be closed, the misaligned joint that I suddenly realize — yeah; there it is! — is where that paragraph from three pages ahead belongs.

As Jonah asks, Why? Is the manuscript’s physicality giving me a greater sense of physical proportion? Does the act of pressing slickened grooves into the page with my fountain pen somehow invite a corresponding mental penetration? Is the curved, flexible rigidity of five sheets in my hand sharpening my awareness of texture? Or perhaps the slowness of my pen relative to the speed of my typing favors this more structural approach — big cross outs, sections circled and moved wholesale, massive reorganizations planned with quick scribbles in the margin — over the finer-grained tweaks and cutting-and-pasting the keyboard seems to encourage. Leer más “Is page reading different from screen reading?”

70 Free High Quality Paper Texture Packs


//creativedesignmagazine.com
Posted by Vartika

Photoshop Textures are really helpful for designers to create beautiful backgrounds. In the past we compile lots of useful textures for our readers. If you miss them then you can read them here Wooden Textures, Metallic Textures, Water Textures, Rust TexturesAbstract Textures and Jeans Textures.

Paper

Paper_by_struckdumb

10 Old Paper Textures

10_old_paper_texture_by_Bleeding_Dragon

Paper Textures 01

Paper_Textures_01_by_nighty_stock

Custom Made Old Paper Pack

Custom_Made_Old_Paper_by_smashmethod

Textures : Paper

Textures__Paper_by_Dioma

Old Paper

Old_Paper_by_paulosanlazaro Leer más “70 Free High Quality Paper Texture Packs”