Stanford alums develop way to review maternal and child health products used in developing nations


Two years ago, Stanford Graduate School of Business alumna Nupur Srivastava spent the summer working in India for D-Rev, a Palo Alto-based non-profit technology incubator. She went there to explore marketing and distribution models for a low-cost neonatal jaundice device she co-designed; during her trip she saw firsthand the lack of accountability related to the quality and efficacy of some products used in developing nations.

“In the U.S. before we spend $20 on a meal there are countless reviews telling you how you should spend your money,” she recently said. “But in the developing world, there is no review system to review products that are a matter of life or death. It’s really frustrating because decision makers would spend a lot of money, and the only information they had was the product data sheet.”

Srivastava wasn’t alone in making this observation. Robyn Calder, a classmate working in the field for the Clinton Health Access Initiative, also experienced the problem. Soon other students working in the social enterprise field voiced similar concerns.

So when Srivastava got together with classmates during a brainstorming session for their Stanford course, Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities, the focus of their startup project became clear: create a Yelp-like review website for maternal and child health products used in low-resource settings. Leer más “Stanford alums develop way to review maternal and child health products used in developing nations”

Stanford alums develop way to review maternal and child health products used in developing nations


Two years ago, Stanford Graduate School of Business alumna Nupur Srivastava spent the summer working in India for D-Rev, a Palo Alto-based non-profit technology incubator. She went there to explore marketing and distribution models for a low-cost neonatal jaundice device she co-designed; during her trip she saw firsthand the lack of accountability related to the quality and efficacy of some products used in developing nations.

“In the U.S. before we spend $20 on a meal there are countless reviews telling you how you should spend your money,” she recently said. “But in the developing world, there is no review system to review products that are a matter of life or death. It’s really frustrating because decision makers would spend a lot of money, and the only information they had was the product data sheet.”

Srivastava wasn’t alone in making this observation. Robyn Calder, a classmate working in the field for the Clinton Health Access Initiative, also experienced the problem. Soon other students working in the social enterprise field voiced similar concerns.

So when Srivastava got together with classmates during a brainstorming session for their Stanford course, Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities, the focus of their startup project became clear: create a Yelp-like review website for maternal and child health products used in low-resource settings. Leer más “Stanford alums develop way to review maternal and child health products used in developing nations”

¿San Francisco o Silicon Valley? – Infografía


Si ya has decidido dar el paso y vas a ir a California a montar tu startup, todavía debes decidir dónde vas a querer situarla. No es lo mismo trabajar en la mitad norte de San Francisco que en San JoséMountain View o Palo Alto. En esta infografía encontrarás información interesante para tomar esta decisión.

Así, por ejemplo, algunas compañías como Twitter, Square o Foursquare se decantaron por San Francisco, mientras que prácricamente todo el mundo sabe que Google está situada en Mountain View, junto a Microsoft y Linkedin.

En la infografía creada por Column Five también hay información sobre servicios básicos como el precio del alquiler en cada zona o los pros y las contras que tiene instalarse en cada una de las localizaciones.

(Click para ampliar)