A 2007 McKinsey innovation report, based on a survey of nearly 1400 executives from around the world showed that the executives unanimously agreed (94%) that people and corporate culture were the most important drivers of innovation. In another major study of 759 firms across 17 major economies, “Corporate Culture” was found to be the primary driver of radical innovation (Radical Innovation Across Nations: The Preeminence of Corporate Culture, Journal of Marketing, Jan. 2009). Booz Allen has been surveying the Global 1000 firms and reporting on them since 2005. In their latest report (The Global Innovation 1000, Why Culture is Key, Issue 65, Winter 2011), they concluded:

 

“The elements that make up a truly innovative company are many: a focused innovation strategy, a winning overall business strategy, deep customer insight, great talent, and the right set of capabilities to achieve successful execution. More important than any of the individual elements, however, is the role played by corporate culture — the organization’s self-sustaining patterns of behaving, feeling, thinking, and believing — in tying them all together.”

 

Unfortunately, enterprise culture is a slippery concept. Scholars define it as the bundle of attitudes, experiences, values, norms, assumptions and beliefs embraced by managers and employees; these, in turn, guide behavior. Regrettably, these elements of the definition of culture are equally slippery, with the result that any executive who wants to create a culture of innovation will have no way to measure the current culture; and without measurement, he or she will find it difficult, if not impossible, to identify a clear point at which to intervene and create positive change.

 

Recognizing this problem, in this book, I offer a model for capturing an innovative culture. I scoured the fields of organizational dynamics, leadership, behavioral science, corporate entrepreneurship and innovation to find theoretical frameworks and models that described organizational culture and culture of innovation. Specifically, I looked for instruments and assessment tools that were actionable; a primary need for all executives hoping to bring about change. In doing so, I found extensive research and models from academia, consulting firms and enterprises themselves, spanning over 30 years.

Innovation at Work

The Culture of Innovation

Hope you all had a great summer (in the northern hemisphere) and peaceful winter down below! Can’t believe that it is already October!

Before I took off for summer, I was hoping to finish off a task I had started in March – summarizing and giving you snippets from my recent book in Spanish. Unfortunately, that didn’t happen. Anyway, for first time readers, the book is titled (translated from Spanish), “Innovation 2.0: Why do we forget about the people when we talk about innovation? A practical way to create a culture of innovation.” Available from: (U.S. Amazon website, Spain Amazon website, Profit Editorial website, In e-book format from todoebook.com).

To help first time readers navigate and regular readers recall what we have covered thus far, I will quickly summarize my previous 5 blogs.

 March 2012 blog: My New Book

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You Already Have the Life You Want

So how do we bridge that gap? How can we turn what we think we want into what we actually get? Here are some strategies I use. Maybe a few of them will work for you:

* Focus on one thing. When I get the idea to make a big change, I usually want to do 100 things all at the same time. This never works. Focus on one thing that will improve your life and don’t move on until you’ve mastered it.

* Find a daily action. Big changes don’t always happen overnight, but what you do every day between sunrise and sunset is the most important part of ensuring it actually does happen. What’s one little thing you can do right now without waiting for anything else to get started? Ask yourself that every’ single’ day. [Más…]

* Reflect on your changes. Is this big transformation you’re after actually making you happier? Best to take a second every now and again to make sure you’re not perpetually suffering from ‘the grass is greener on the other side‘ syndrome. Make sure you’re headed the right direction.

* Change your environment. Sometimes I don’t realize just how much my surroundings affect my behavior. A routine environment perpetuates routine behavior. If you want change to come a little easier, change the scenery for a while and build a new set of behaviors to associate with it.

* Rebalance relationships. Just like your environment, the people you’re around influence how you act. Truth is, your friends don’t want you to change even if they say they do because that makes them uncomfortable. The first time I decided to be a writer, I hung around with all the same people that didn’t understand me. The second time I decided to be a writer, I started hanging around other successful writers. Which one worked?

* Eliminate barriers. Sometimes they’re mental, and sometimes they’re physical. Either way, you have to get creative to find ways around them. If you don’t have the time to do something, how can you fit it into little sessions that will add up over time? If you don’t have the money to do something, what else do you have that you can trade for what you want?

* Ask for help. We all get stuck. I do regularly. I used to have too much pride to ask for help ‚’I’d rather figure it out on my own. Now I realize that’s foolish and asking for help is a hell of a lot faster and easier. There’s no shame in being more efficient.

* Find a role model. One of the fastest ways to success is to model it. Who’s already done what you’re trying to do? What things did they do that got them there faster? What slowed them down? Model what worked, avoid what didn’t.

* Relax already! Active relaxation ‚’doing things that engage you but aren’t your main focus ‚’ can bring a lot of clarity when you’re obsessing over something. I can brainstorm all day, but it doesn’t mean I’ll come up with a good idea. Those usually creep in when I finally take a break and do something else.


(…)

http://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/you-already-have-the-life-you-want/

Written by Tyler Tervooren

So how do we bridge that gap? How can we turn what we think we want into what we actually get? Here are some strategies I use. Maybe a few of them will work for you:

  • Focus on one thing. When I get the idea to make a big change, I usually want to do 100 things all at the same time. This never works. Focus on one thing that will improve your life and don’t move on until you’ve mastered it.
  • Find a daily action. Big changes don’t always happen overnight, but what you do every day between sunrise and sunset is the most important part of ensuring it actually does happen. What’s one little thing you can do right now without waiting for anything else to get started? Ask yourself that every’ single’ day. Leer más “You Already Have the Life You Want”

The CEO’s Innovation Nightmare – BusinessWeek


yellow

What is to be done?

Some Helpful Tips

We know this column could come across as a bit cynical. But we are truly hopeless optimists, so let’s get to some solutions. If you are a bullish CEO or a bullish innovator within the ranks, here are few tips that will absolutely make your corporate life better—and more fulfilling.

Let’s start with counsel for the CEOs:

Recruit believers. Henry Ford said, “If you believe you can or believe you can’t, you’re right.” If you have people on your staff who don’t really believe change is possible or that the old way is good enough, for God‘s sake, release them to find a more fulfilling destiny. If you don’t have the guts to do it, then please stop saying you are going to change the world. Because your people simply won’t let it happen, and you are going to look like a fool.

Hire objective senior managers. This is a nice way of saying you should bring in leaders from outside your industry.

Full article:
The CEO’s Innovation Nightmare – BusinessWeek
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10 Insights: A First Look at The New Intelligent Enterprise Survey

How do you win with data? SMR surveyed global executives about turning the data deluge and analytics into competitive advantage. Here’s an early snapshot of how managers are answering the most important question organizations face.

Last May, at the MIT Sloan CIO Symposium main-stage discussion on “Emerging Stronger from the Downturn,” one panelist listened with a growing private smile as his fellow speakers described example after example of how technology-driven information and analytics applications were transforming their companies. The stories were of data and analysis being used to understand customers, parse trends, distribute decision making, manage risk; they foretold of organizations being reinvented and management practice being rethought. They told of change, basically. A lot of it. Driven by ever-emerging technology and the new things it could do.

That was the point at which the panelist, a multinational industrial COO, turned to the audience and unofficially summarized, “So, the lesson: If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less.”

He’s right. Change is here. Failure to adapt means irrelevance. Time and progress march on, but at a Moore’s law pace instead of a clock’s. [Más…]

However, the focus on exactly what’s changing can be misplaced. For all the swiftness with which technology is shifting — getting smarter, more powerful, more cognitively “human” — it’s sometimes true that the attention we pay to the next new technology is a distraction. It distracts us from the changes that organizations could make with no more new technology at all — the changes organizations could achieve just by capitalizing on how current technology can enable them to capture, analyze and act on information. (Though the “just” in that sentence may be ill-advised.)

MIT Sloan School’s Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the MIT Center for Digital Business, talked about that kind of change in an interview with SMR:

“Although most of what I’ve been talking about has focused on changes in the technology, I think the biggest changes are going to be in the way the companies use the technology. If some catastrophe happened and technology just froze for the next couple of decades, I believe the pace of organizational change would continue just as rapidly, because we have so much catching up to do. Specifically, I think this cultural mentality of using data more effectively, running experiments and responding to the environment and replicating it is something that is going to happen regardless of what additional advances we see in the underlying technology. A decade from now, I expect companies to be far more responsive, far more innovative, far more analytics-minded.”

Brynjolfsson gave experimentation special emphasis, but his observation fits other information-enabled practices found under the big tent of analytics. The technology is here. The data are available. How will companies use them to win?

To answer that question, SMR has teamed with the IBM Institute for Business Value to build a new innovation hub and research program called “The New Intelligent Enterprise.”

Through the SMR and IBM IBV collaboration, The New Intelligent Enterprise aims to help managers understand how they can capitalize on the ways that information and analytics are changing the competitive landscape. What threats and opportunities will companies face? What new business models, organizational approaches, competitive strategies, work processes and leadership methods will emerge? How will the best organizations reinvent themselves to use technology and analytics to achieve novel competitive advantage? How will they learn not only to be smarter, but to act smarter?

In the months ahead, this inquiry into the makeup of The New Intelligent Enterprise will consist of survey research, in-depth interviews with thought leaders and top corporate executives worldwide and the most relevant academic research and case study work in the field. This article presents (very) early returns on that research — especially on the first annual New Intelligent Enterprise Survey, a global survey of nearly 3,000 executives who told us about their top management goals, their uses (and misuses) of information and analytics as they attacked those goals and the management practices in play in their organizations. In both this article and “10 Data Points,” we call out some of what we’re learning. The articles have been coauthored by core members of The New Intelligent Enterprise team: Steve LaValle, IBM Global Strategy Leader for Business Analytics and Optimization; Nina Kruschwitz, SMR Special Projects Editor; Rebecca Shockley, IBM IBV Global Lead for Business Analytics and Optimization; and Fred Balboni, IBM Global Leader for Business Analytics and Optimization.

Please note: What’s here is only preliminary — a true “first look” at the themes, benchmarks and questions that are surfacing. Next on the schedule: conclusive analysis of the survey and stage-one interview findings will be published in a New Intelligent Enterprise Special Report on October 25. Selected interviews will be published online through early winter. And in late December, the Winter issue of SMR will include further exploration of the key ideas in October’s Special Report.

For now, though, consider the following notes — and the survey statistics in “10 Data Points” — as a collective reminder to reexamine your own practices and plans. As the gentleman said, If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less.

Here are 10 observations and questions about analytics-driven management that have popped out of research and interviews so far, and which we’ll be exploring more deeply in the major reports ahead.


By Michael S. Hopkins, Steve LaValle and Fred Balboni
http://sloanreview.mit.edu

How do you win with data? SMR surveyed global executives about turning the data deluge and analytics into competitive advantage. Here’s an early snapshot of how managers are answering the most important question organizations face.

Last May, at the MIT Sloan CIO Symposium main-stage discussion on “Emerging Stronger from the Downturn,” one panelist listened with a growing private smile as his fellow speakers described example after example of how technology-driven information and analytics applications were transforming their companies. The stories were of data and analysis being used to understand customers, parse trends, distribute decision making, manage risk; they foretold of organizations being reinvented and management practice being rethought. They told of change, basically. A lot of it. Driven by ever-emerging technology and the new things it could do.

That was the point at which the panelist, a multinational industrial COO, turned to the audience and unofficially summarized, “So, the lesson: If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less.”

He’s right. Change is here. Failure to adapt means irrelevance. Time and progress march on, but at a Moore’s law pace instead of a clock’s. Leer más “10 Insights: A First Look at The New Intelligent Enterprise Survey”

Leadership and Change

First the bad news: If you’re not willing to embrace change you’re not ready to lead. Put simply, leadership is not a static endeavor. In fact, leadership demands fluidity, which requires the willingness to recognize the need for change, and finally the ability to lead change.

Now the good news: As much as some people want to create complexity around the topic of leading change for personal gain, the reality is that creating, managing and leading change is really quite simple. To prove my point, I’ll not only explain the entire change life-cycle in three short paragraphs, but I’ll do it in simple terms that anyone can understand. As a bonus I’ll also give you 10 items to assess in evaluating whether the change you’re considering is value added, or just change for the sake of change. [Más…]

An Overview on the Importance of Change:

While there is little debate that the successful implementation of change can create an extreme competitive advantage, it is not well understood that the lack of doing so can send a company (or an individual’s career) into a death spiral. Companies that seek out and embrace change are healthy, growing, and dynamic organizations, while companies that fear change are stagnant entities on their way to a slow and painful death.

Agility, innovation, disruption, fluidity, decisiveness, commitment, and above all else a bias toward action will lead to the creation of change. It is the implementation of change which results in evolving, growing and thriving companies. Much has been written about the importance of change, but there is very little information in circulation about how to actually create it.

While most executives and entrepreneurs have come to accept the concept of change management as a legitimate business practice, and change leadership as a legitimate executive priority in theory, I have found very few organizations that have effectively integrated change as a core discipline and focus area in reality. As promised, and without further ado, the change life-cycle in three easy steps:

A. Identifying the Need for Change: The need for change exists in every organization. Other than irrational change solely for the sake of change, every corporation must change to survive. If your entity doesn’t innovate and change in accordance with market driven needs and demands it will fail…it’s just that simple. The most complex area surrounding change is focusing your efforts in the right areas, for the right reasons, and at the right times. The ambiguity and risk can be taken out of the change agenda by simply focusing on three areas:

1. Your current customers – What needs to change to better serve your customers?
2. Potential customers – What needs to change to profitably create new customers?
3. Your talent and resources – What changes need to occur to better leverage existing talent and resources?

B. Leading Change: You cannot effectively lead change without understanding the landscape of change. There are four typical responses to change:

1. The Victim – Those that view change as a personal attack on their persona, their role, their job, or their area of responsibility. They view everything at an atomic level based upon how they perceive change will directly and indirectly impact them.
2. The Neutral Bystander – This group is neither for nor against change. They will not directly or vocally oppose change, nor will they proactively get behind change. The Neutral Bystander will just go with the flow not wanting to make any waves, and thus hoping to perpetually fly under the radar.
3. The Critic – The Critic opposes any and all change. Keep in mind that not all critics are overt in their resistance. Many critics remain in stealth mode trying to derail change behind the scenes by using their influence on others. Whether overt or covert, you must identify critics of change early in the process if you hope to succeed.
4. The Advocate – The Advocate not only embraces change, they will evangelize the change initiative. Like The Critics, it is important to identify The Advocates early in the process to not only build the power base for change, but to give momentum and enthusiasm to the change initiative.

Once you’ve identified these change constituencies you must involve all of them, message properly to each of them, and don’t let up. With the proper messaging and involvement even adversaries can be converted into allies.


by Mike Myatt
//business-strategy-innovation.com

Leadership and ChangeFirst the bad news: If you’re not willing to embrace change you’re not ready to lead. Put simply, leadership is not a static endeavor. In fact, leadership demands fluidity, which requires the willingness to recognize the need for change, and finally the ability to lead change.

Now the good news: As much as some people want to create complexity around the topic of leading change for personal gain, the reality is that creating, managing and leading change is really quite simple. To prove my point, I’ll not only explain the entire change life-cycle in three short paragraphs, but I’ll do it in simple terms that anyone can understand. As a bonus I’ll also give you 10 items to assess in evaluating whether the change you’re considering is value added, or just change for the sake of change. Leer más “Leadership and Change”

Prepare for the unexpected

Imagine that you are a pilot and you have to fly through a 5 mile canyon upside down. It’s actually kind of hard to imagine because it’s not something you’re trained to do but it’s something that could happen in a real life situation. It’s a scenario that’s outside your direct experience, you find it hard to accept it as possible and even worse adapting to it.

Now think about it this way:

What if businesses were judged on their ability to create ‘happiness for customers’? What if all those like buttons had less to do with becoming a fan and more to do with specific actions an organization took to actually make a customer happy? What if you hired people based on how happy they’ll make your customers? What if there were a ‘customer happiness index’ dashboard (Tweetdeck) and we’d all have access to it just like the stock market? What if businesses were penalized for wasting people’s time?


A smiley by Pumbaa, drawn using a text editor.

Imagine that you are a pilot and you have to fly through a 5 mile canyon upside down. It’s actually kind of hard to imagine because it’s not something you’re trained to do but it’s something that could happen in a real life situation. It’s a scenario that’s outside your direct experience, you find it hard to accept it as possible and even worse adapting to it.

Now think about it this way:

What if businesses were judged on their ability to create ‘happiness for customers’? What if all those like buttons had less to do with becoming a fan and more to do with specific actions an organization took to actually make a customer happy? What if you hired people based on how happy they’ll make your customers? What  if there were a ‘customer happiness index’ dashboard (Tweetdeck) and we’d all have access to it just like the stock market? What if businesses were penalized for wasting people’s time?

Imagine how every business would behave. Leer más “Prepare for the unexpected”