Three questions to ask your marketing team – Vía @ThisIsSethsBlog CC/ @danidron @smilatam


by Seth Godin
(or your business development team, your fundraising team or your pr folks)…

  • Who are you trying to reach?
  • Why do they decide to support us?
  • What do you need in order to make this happen more often?

The answer? + http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2013/09/three-questions-to-ask-your-marketing-team.html

 

What is a Mission Statement? | businessnewsdaily.com


Vía businessnewsdaily.com

A mission statement is a statement declaring the purpose of an organization or company — the reason for this company’s existence. A mission statement provides framework and context to help guide the company’s strategies and actions by spelling out the company’s overall goal. Ultimately, a mission statement helps guide decision-making internally while also articulating the company’s mission to customers, suppliers, and the community.

It’s important to note the distinction between a mission statement and a slogan. A mission statement is not a marketing tool designed to grab attention quickly. While it should be catchy and memorable, a mission statement is a thoughtful declaration designed to articulate the goals and philosophies of a company. A mission statement is also not a business plan. A business plan is an organized outline of your ideas about how the business functions.

A mission statement differs from a vision statement. A mission statement says what the company currently is; a vision statement states what the company hopes to become. A mission statement is also not a business plan. A business plan is an organized outline of your ideas about how the business functions.

A mission statement is not an evergreen statement. As a company evolves over time, the company’s mission and intent may also change. A good rule of thumb is to revisit the mission statement every five years to see if it needs to be fine-tuned or rewritten. A mission statement will keep your company on track, but it shouldn’t become stale or irrelevant.

What does a mission statement include?

Leer más “What is a Mission Statement? | businessnewsdaily.com”

Retaining Great Employees: It’s Not About the Money


Written by Mansur Hasib

As IT managers and leaders, it is our job to foster the professional growth of everyone who works on our team. If we do not do this we are failing as leaders.

I have had many discussions on the topic of training with both employees and managers. Many IT managers are afraid that certifications will make their employees more marketable and allow them to find better opportunities. Employees are frustrated that their managers do not allow them to grow and so eventually they leave to find better opportunities to learn and to grow professionally.

When I was negotiating my budget as a CIO, I asked for and received $2,000 per year for every employee that could only be used for travel or training. It required the consultation of supervisors and could be used for a conference or even a certification. Since some training is more expensive, employees were allowed to trade and give someone their training dollars for one year so they could get it back from the recipient in a subsequent year. At times I was able to recruit someone simply because I had this guaranteed annual training benefit.

Leer más “Retaining Great Employees: It’s Not About the Money”

To Create an Enduring Vision, Values Must Support Purpose


 Gabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

Values must support your organization’s purpose and desired future. Ask first, “What are our values?” Then ask, “Do our values enable us to fulfill our purpose and our potential?

“Vision is a clearly articulated, results-oriented picture of a future you intend to create. It is a dream with direction.” In short, vision is a combination of three basic elements: 1) a significant purpose, reason for existence, 2) a clear picture of the future, and 3) the underlying core values.

In my last two posts, I discussed the elements of purpose and picture of the future. This post focuses on the third element – values.

Our values are our deeply held beliefs about what is right and good, evoking standards that we care deeply about. They drive our behaviors and decisions, trigger our emotions, and can fuel a passion that drives commitment, even in the face of obstacles and change.

An engaging vision, one that captures our hearts, does so because it clearly resonates with our core values. When a group of people discover they share the same values, there is a significant increase in energy, commitment and trust.

Values must support purpose…   Leer más “To Create an Enduring Vision, Values Must Support Purpose”

The Role of the Chief Strategy Officer


By Taman H. Powell and Duncan N. AngwinBy understanding how the duties of the chief strategy officer (CSO) can vary significantly from organization to organization, boards and CEOs can make better decisions about which type of CSO is necessary for their leadership teams.



THE CHIEF STRATEGY OFFICER
 (CSO) is a comparatively new but increasingly important role in many organizations. To explore the role of the CSO, we conducted 24 interviews with CSOs at U.K. companies that are part of the FTSE 100 Index, across a number of industrial sectors. Secondary data — company reports, strategy documents and presentations — were used to complement the interviews. All interviews were conducted either at the CSO’s office or via telephone and followed the same semistructured outline and set of questions.

They were transcribed verbatim and analyzed through qualitative data management software.From the outset, it was clear that there was a variation in CSO roles, focused on two dimensions.

The first dimension was the stage of the strategy process in which the CSO was involved. Our findings identified a significant demarcation between whether the CSO was focused on the formulation of the strategy or the execution of the strategy.

The second dimension of variation was how the CSO engaged in the strategy process. Some CSOs were facilitators, advising business units during the strategy formulation or assisting in the execution. Other CSOs were enactors, far more likely to execute the strategy process by themselves or with their team.Based on variation in the roles carried out by the CSOs, we have developed a typology of four CSO archetypes. Leer más “The Role of the Chief Strategy Officer”

Successful Leaders Don’t Need to be Present by Stephan De Villiers


http://switchandshift.com

If you’ve not read Stephan’s writings then welcome. For 21st century leaders, the over dependence on managers to make decisions is a bottleneck to progress. Though it may keep change resistant managers happy, it leaves many dissatisfied. Stephan offers up some insights to move away from the staleness inherent in inflated importance. This is part one of two.

If Your People are not Thinking, You are Failing as a Leader

Meet Gary.  He is the leader of a small organization and a very “hands on” guy.  He makes a point of knowing about every single detail in the organization and gets involved in the detail 90% of the time.  He further prides himself in his problem solving abilities. He is the “go to guy” and likes the fact that people look up to him when they have a problem. He gets involved in all the decision making processes in the organization.  In his mind he plays a vital role in solving problems and making important decisions.  Gary is convinced he is a very effective leader and his contribution plays an important role in the success of the organization.

Making People Dependant

The sad truth is Gary is not a very effective leader.  The way he leads people creates a culture of dependence on him as leader in the organization.  This results in people not thinking anymore, becoming lazy to solving problems and losing confidence to make decisions on their own.  Through his behaviour Gary stifles the creative genius of the people he leads.  By not affording them the opportunity to think and come up with solutions to problems and challenges, he has made them dependant.

Gary is not only doing the organization a disservice, but himself as well.  By focussing so much on solving other people’s problems, he neglects development areas in his personal leadership, such as coaching and setting direction.  He spends most of his time involved in problem solving mode, stealing time he could have spent more productively.

Successful Leaders Don’t Need to be Present

Successful leadership means your followers don’t need you around for them to be productive.  They can operate without you.  Once you set the direction, they move on their own accord towards the goal.  This means as leader you can spend your time on motivating, coaching and course correcting.  A successful leader allows people to make their own decisions.  It means they must be able to face problems and come up with solutions, without involving the leader in the process of getting to the solution. To achieve this, people in the organization must think for themselves.

People need to be trained to think. It may sound strange, because doesn’t thinking come rather naturally? The truth is very few people actually learn to think in terms of problem solving. Thinking skills like lateral thinking, thinking out of the box and analytical thinking, unfortunately does not come without training.

As a leader it is your job to help people to develop these skills. At first it will take a lot of effort and will not be easy, especially if your organization has a culture of dependency. It will also take effort from your side, because you will have to trust people to come up with solutions and make the right decisions. You will have to deal with wrong decisions and mistakes as part of the growing pains.

Being available as coach to guide and give advice will become your primary function during this transition. The good news is there is a process you can follow to make it easier to train people in their thinking processes.

The Think Training Process… Leer más “Successful Leaders Don’t Need to be Present by Stephan De Villiers”

Changing the Conversation in Your Company


Boris Groysberg and Michael Slind

BORIS GROYSBERG AND MICHAEL SLIND
http://blogs.hbr.org

 

Boris Groysberg (bgroysberg@hbs.edu) is a professor of business administration at Harvard Business School. Michael Slind (mike@talkincbook.com) is a writer, editor, and communication consultant. They are co-authors of the book Talk, Inc.: How Trusted Leaders Use Conversation to Power Their Organizations (HBR Press, 2012).

In our experience, it’s rare for a diverse group of headstrong Executive Education participants from around the globe to agree on anything. Yet earlier this month, when we surveyed a group of leaders who attended the Driving Performance Through Talent Management program at Harvard Business School, 92% agreed that the practice of internal communication “has undergone a lot of change” at their companies “in recent years.”

While the sample size in this case isn’t large — about three-dozen leaders took part in the survey — these participants make up a highly representative group. They hail from every part of the globe, and from organizations small and large (with head counts that range from about 200 to more than 100,000). They occupy senior positions in fields that include sales and talent management, and they work in industries that range from manufacturing to health care to financial services.

That survey result reinforces a finding that we’ve observed elsewhere in our research: in company after company, the patterns and processes by which people communicate with each other are unmistakably in flux. The old “corporate communication” is giving way to a model that we call “organizational conversation.” That shift is, for many people, a disorienting process. But it also offers a great leadership opportunity.

Our research has shown that more and more leaders — from organizations that range from computer-networking giant Cisco Systems to Hindustan Petroleum, a large India-based oil supplier — are using the power of organizational conversation to drive their company forward. For these leaders, internal communication isn’t just an HR function. It’s an engine of value that boosts employee engagement and improves strategic alignment.

Broadly speaking, there are four steps that you can take to make your approach to leadership more conversational. (In future posts, we will address each of these points at greater length.)

1. Close the gap between you and your employees. In our survey, we also asked respondents to name the biggest employee communication challenge at their company. In response, one participant cited the need to “move away from top-down communication.” Another highlighted a “disparity between the senior management team and middle management due to low transparency.” Trusted and effective leaders overcome such challenges by speaking with employees in ways that are direct, personal, open, and authentic.

2. Promote two-way dialogue within your company… Leer más “Changing the Conversation in Your Company”

How to not go it alone when it comes to transforming ideas into innovations | ***POST DESTACADO***

Co-innovation is where two organizations come together in a 50/50 contribution of resources with the relationship having the following charactersics:

Each party has IP (intellectual property) to contribute
The two parties have an agreed upon area of strong mutual interest
There is agreement on the target (who is the market for the innovation, what is the innovation and how we go about creating and launching the innovation).
Neither of the organizations can deliver the innovation alone thus a mutual dependency.
The partners agree to deliver a real innovation to the market is an aggressive timeline (e.g. 24 months) where the innovation will have real and meaningful impact to both organizations
To lean how to setup co-innovation relationships, the lessons learned from having run +30 of these relationships and the pitfalls to avoid, listen to the podcast.


http://philmckinney.com

PHILMCKINNEY | MARCH 12, 2012

Using co-innovation to leverage R&D spend

Co-Innovation As A Type Of Innovation

One of the areas that is overlooked by most organizations is the opportunity for a new type of innovation: co-innovation.  Co-Innovation is different from what most organizations call joint R&D, joint ventures (JV) or customer driven innovation.

What is co-innovation?>>> Leer más “How to not go it alone when it comes to transforming ideas into innovations | ***POST DESTACADO***”

Business Strategy Innovation Diamond (BSID)

Continuing my quest to surface some classics that the Innovation Excellence audience will have never seen, here is another from 2007:

I would like to introduce a visual metaphor that the consultants use at Business Strategy Innovation. It’s called, predictably enough, the Business Strategy Innovation Diamond, or the BSID. There is another reason we use it, to “ID” the “BS” in an organization. Now a lot of people would represent strategy as the top of a pyramid, processes in the middle, and systems as the base of a pyramid, but that ignores two of the most important tools in any organization – policies and reporting. Business Strategy Innovation instead starts with a diamond that looks like this: The BSID focuses your organization on making sure that the policies support the strategy, that the processes facilitate the policies, that the systems enable the processes, and the reporting measures the execution of the strategy. Not focusing on the BSID, may result in just BS instead of strategic innovation.


http://www.innovationexcellence.com
by Braden Kelley

Continuing my quest to surface some classics that the Innovation Excellence audience will have never seen, here is another from 2007:I would like to introduce a visual metaphor that the consultants use at Business Strategy Innovation. It’s called, predictably enough, the Business Strategy Innovation Diamond, or the BSID. There is another reason we use it, to “ID” the “BS” in an organization. Now a lot of people would represent strategy as the top of a pyramid, processes in the middle, and systems as the base of a pyramid, but that ignores two of the most important tools in any organization – policies and reporting. Business Strategy Innovation instead starts with a diamond that looks like this:

Business Strategy Innovation Diamond

Here is an example of how the Business Strategy Innovation Diamond can help you structure an organizational analysis project: Leer más “Business Strategy Innovation Diamond (BSID)”

Leadership and management

The approaches that we do, to meet the challenges inherent in organizational culture, when we turn to outside, to open innovation put some leadership questions.

Executives on strategic functions when they want to embrace open innovation can face the future with lack of security. But managing the tension between control and collaboration between technical contributions and management can resolve personal and organizational conflicts.

This leadership, i.e. the members of the organization which plays such a role, in addition to establish the direction that developers should follow must ensure that the resources meet the needs of planned activities.


The five dimensions of Meta-leadership as deve...

Thnxs to   abaldaia.wordpress.com | Intuinovare

The approaches that we do, to meet the challenges inherent in organizational culture, when we turn to outside, to open innovation put some leadership questions.

Executives on strategic functions when they want to embrace open innovation can face the future with lack of security. But managing the tension between control and collaboration between technical contributions and management can resolve personal and organizational conflicts.

This leadership, i.e. the members of the organization which plays such a role, in addition to establish the direction that developers should follow must ensure that the resources meet the needs of planned activities. Leer más “Leadership and management”

Get Organized Now: 3 Ways to Get Organized

Getting organized can be a huge pain the butt. Tasks pile up, your to-do list gets out of control, you feel overwhelmed with all that needs done, and you dread home office organization. Yet, if you want to have peace of mind and a clean work space, you need to get organized. So how to get organized, then? Well, you’re in luck, because this article features three ways to get organized.

Learning how to get organized is very simple. The point is to get organized so that you then focus on your important task at hand. Or your life. But definitely not focusing on the organizing itself. Getting organized is a means to an end.

So without further ado, here are the three ways to get organized:
1. Productively Procrastinate

You will inevitably procrastinate during part of your week. It’s fine – we all do. We’re only human. But just because you procrastinate doesn’t mean you need to waste time. You should productively procrastinate.

When you want to avoid doing the major task in front of you, take care of some not-as-important-but-still-useful tasks on your to-do list. The ones that don’t require much thought are especially good. Maybe it’s cleaning and organizing files and folders on your computer, or doing some home office organization. Anything that’s been lingering on your to-do list.

While these tasks aren’t the really important ones, they’re still useful. And rather than wasting your time surfing the web or watching cat videos, you can more effectively spend your procrastination time. Plus, you don’t have to set aside special time for getting organized: you simply use the pockets of time for when you feel like procrastinating. Productive procrastination is actually some of the best moments to get organized.


Organized

Getting organized can be a huge pain the butt. Tasks pile up, your to-do list gets out of control, you feel overwhelmed with all that needs done, and you dread home office organization. Yet, if you want to have peace of mind and a clean work space, you need to get organized. So how to get organized, then? Well, you’re in luck, because this article features three ways to get organized.

Learning how to get organized is very simple. The point is to get organized so that you then focus on your important task at hand. Or your life. But definitely not focusing on the organizing itself. Getting organized is a means to an end.

So without further ado, here are the three ways to get organized:

1. Productively Procrastinate

You will inevitably procrastinate during part of your week. It’s fine – we all do. We’re only human. But just because you procrastinate doesn’t mean you need to waste time. You should productively procrastinate.

When you want to avoid doing the major task in front of you, take care of some not-as-important-but-still-useful tasks on your to-do list. The ones that don’t require much thought are especially good. Maybe it’s cleaning and organizing files and folders on your computer, or doing some home office organization. Anything that’s been lingering on your to-do list.

While these tasks aren’t the really important ones, they’re still useful. And rather than wasting your time surfing the web or watching cat videos, you can more effectively spend your procrastination time. Plus, you don’t have to set aside special time for getting organized: you simply use the pockets of time for when you feel like procrastinating. Productive procrastination is actually some of the best moments to get organized. Leer más “Get Organized Now: 3 Ways to Get Organized”

Scenario Planning + Managing Your Inevitable Social Media Crisis

Source: Decision Strategies International

I see it weekly if not monthly. Brand or company X goes about their business on a social platform, marketing, putting out fun apps, doling out coupons and yes in some cases, engaging. Then one day, they get attacked by their customers or perhaps an advocacy group. The response tends to always be the same.

Shut it down.

In my estimation, the organization, business or brand in question has not gone through the rigor of scenario planning, and doing the fire-drills to prepare for attacks in social media. The biggest farce any organization will believe in social media is that they will be loved the moment they engage in social media. They may be. They will likely be hated as well and everything in between. Here are some thoughts that every organization who chooses to participate in social media should consider before, during and after they build their followers, fans and attract foes.


http://darmano.typepad.com/logic_emotion/2010/11/scenarios.html

Screen shot 2010-11-30 at 10.38.47 AM
Source: Decision Strategies International

I see it weekly if not monthly. Brand or company X goes about their business on a social platform, marketing, putting out fun apps, doling out coupons and yes in some cases, engaging. Then one day, they get attacked by their customers or perhaps an advocacy group. The response tends to always be the same.

Shut it down.

In my estimation, the organization, business or brand in question has not gone through the rigor of scenario planning, and doing the fire-drills to prepare for attacks in social media. The biggest farce any organization will believe in social media is that they will be loved the moment they engage in social media. They may be. They will likely be hated as well and everything in between.  Here are some thoughts that every organization who chooses to participate in social media should consider before, during and after they build their followers, fans and attract foes. Leer más “Scenario Planning + Managing Your Inevitable Social Media Crisis”

Innovation – Amplify creativity and skills in management

For this the creation of an environment of creativity becomes crucial for every employee understands the Organization as a whole and not just the job they habitually performs its tasks.

And so it alive this all as a passion, thereby providing a balance of responsibilities between work and family and social life, it is necessary that he find a deeper meaning that promotes actions.

This meaning is indeed what will be forwarded to the customers of the companies and that promotes the sustainability of these.

This “freedom” being relaxed is an act of exemplary management that promotes the future of employees and Organization and the benefits are clear:

-An undertaking shall be an essential element of the work environment. Employee satisfaction and motivation are leveraged and symptoms of saturation are disappearing.

-The commitment of employees is rewarded not only with increased responsibilities but also with the bonus to be part of the “Club” business. Is there a sense of belonging to a whole as enterprise.

-The social balance becomes stable contagiously environments where employees interact.

-Creativity and innovation are brought together to the diligence and promote individual and collective initiatives.

“The first job of any manager is to amplify human capabilities–that is, to create an environment in which individuals are empowered, equipped and encouraged to give the very best of themselves. The second task is to aggregate individual efforts in ways that allow human beings to do together what they couldn’t do on their own.” Gary Hamel

Whether in a collaborator role or in the role of Manager recycling make passes through abandon the bureaucratic routines and amplify the abilities of people and this is achieved by creating a clean and simple climate in the area of knowledge and a colorful atmosphere, full of emotions, in the area of creativity and innovation.


por jabaldaia
http://abaldaia.wordpress.com/

Celebrating the Imagination

It’s absolutely amazing the amount of  tools and new technologies that we have today at our disposal and that has not significant costs in our day-to-day.

It is true that we are creators and inheritors of much non-recyclable waste in this area and that we must now eventually create systems of cleaning waste from these out of date satellites or end of life to the multitude of hardware or obsolete machines stationed at the bottom of the garage.

And so, it will require so much imagination to turn waste into something useful as to create them.

Start by recycling our way of thinking, giving more weight to our creativity and less to conformity and obedience.

Let obedience and embrace the collaboration and it will not be because of that, that leaders no longer exist.

Gary Hamel says today’s workforce offers basically only the presence and the assurance of they will do what we say to them.

We see this with ease in the vast majority of undertakings by looking at the proposals of the human resources services to reward employee participation in company’s activity.

They are rewarded, not by learning and creativity but by the ability to reproduce accurately predetermined tasks.

This prospect of facing employees as performers that maximize your potential by applying their knowledge within the limits imposed by companies is useful for ensuring the delivery of products or services to consumers and users, but not explores nor allows developers to exploit its potential of initiative, creativity and passion.

Companies must let the employees and began to have collaborators. Leer más “Innovation – Amplify creativity and skills in management”

10 Data Points: Information and Analytics at Work

The New Intelligent Enterprise inquiry is all about the intensifying wave of data that organizations are facing, and its implications for managers. Companies are becoming data driven in ways that are new, raw and — in many cases — untested. And now so are we: We’re trying something new by letting the data come first, without a lot of editing or parsing. Here is a slice of the raw goods, a kind of behind-the-scenes look at the data we gathered from our survey of nearly 3,000 managers and executives from every major industry and all regions of the globe. (Also see “10 Insights: A First Look at The New Intelligent Enterprise Survey.”)

We chose these 10 charts to share because they captured our attention. Some are provocative, some are telling, and some raise questions we haven’t even tried to answer yet. They’re by no means comprehensive, and our final report will cover many more points accompanied by rigorous analysis. But we do think you’ll find these graphics worth a look if for no other reason than that they allow you to do some immediate benchmarking. How does your organization compare with others? What are your peers doing, and how might that influence decisions you’re considering right now?

The survey respondents answered two questions that allowed us to group them and their answers in some interesting ways. One question asked them to assess where their organization is along the journey to an ideal state: an organization that has been “transformed by better ways to collect, analyze and be prescriptively guided by information.” Those that were farthest along that path we deemed Sophisticates; those who were midway became Intermediates; while those that were just beginning to look at data and analytics we called Starters.

We also asked them to describe their organization’s competitive position. Those that rated themselves as substantially outperforming their industry peers we named Top Performers. Those that were underperforming we labeled Lower Performers. You’ll note both groups called out in the accompanying charts.
1. Innovation is the Top Business Challenge

More than 60% of all respondents chose innovation for competitive differentiation as their main business challenge over the next two years. In a recessionary business climate, doing more with the resources and talent you already have is always a favored strategy. When we parsed the data, we found that Starters (new users of analytics) were entrenched in “survival mode,” focused on cuttings costs and creating efficiencies as their main challenge. Intermediates (moderate users of analytics) were in “growth mode,” focused on growing revenues. Sophisticates (advanced users of analytics) were in an “expansion mode,” focused on growing revenues and expanding their customer base through acquisition or retention strategies, perhaps because their use of analytics had already helped them optimize their operations and general growth approaches.


http://sloanreview.mit.edu/the-magazine/articles/2010/fall/521150/10-data-points-information-and-analytics-at-work/

By Nina Kruschwitz and Rebecca Shockley

Early returns are in from the first annual New Intelligent Enterprise Survey. Here are major highlights of what executives and managers said about how they are — or are not — capitalizing on information.


The New Intelligent Enterprise inquiry is all about the intensifying wave of data that organizations are facing, and its implications for managers. Companies are becoming data driven in ways that are new, raw and — in many cases — untested. And now so are we: We’re trying something new by letting the data come first, without a lot of editing or parsing. Here is a slice of the raw goods, a kind of behind-the-scenes look at the data we gathered from our survey of nearly 3,000 managers and executives from every major industry and all regions of the globe. (Also see “10 Insights: A First Look at The New Intelligent Enterprise Survey.”)

We chose these 10 charts to share because they captured our attention. Some are provocative, some are telling, and some raise questions we haven’t even tried to answer yet. They’re by no means comprehensive, and our final report will cover many more points accompanied by rigorous analysis. But we do think you’ll find these graphics worth a look if for no other reason than that they allow you to do some immediate benchmarking. How does your organization compare with others? What are your peers doing, and how might that influence decisions you’re considering right now?

The survey respondents answered two questions that allowed us to group them and their answers in some interesting ways. One question asked them to assess where their organization is along the journey to an ideal state: an organization that has been “transformed by better ways to collect, analyze and be prescriptively guided by information.” Those that were farthest along that path we deemed Sophisticates; those who were midway became Intermediates; while those that were just beginning to look at data and analytics we called Starters.

We also asked them to describe their organization’s competitive position. Those that rated themselves as substantially outperforming their industry peers we named Top Performers. Those that were underperforming we labeled Lower Performers. You’ll note both groups called out in the accompanying charts.

1. Innovation is the Top Business Challenge

More than 60% of all respondents chose innovation for competitive differentiation as their main business challenge over the next two years. In a recessionary business climate, doing more with the resources and talent you already have is always a favored strategy. When we parsed the data, we found that Starters (new users of analytics) were entrenched in “survival mode,” focused on cuttings costs and creating efficiencies as their main challenge. Intermediates (moderate users of analytics) were in “growth mode,” focused on growing revenues. Sophisticates (advanced users of analytics) were in an “expansion mode,” focused on growing revenues and expanding their customer base through acquisition or retention strategies, perhaps because their use of analytics had already helped them optimize their operations and general growth approaches.

Organization Tips For Web Designers

As a web designer, you’re often forced to wear many different hats every day. You’re the CEO, creative director, office manager, coffee fetcher and sometimes even janitor. That’s a lot for anyone, and it certainly makes it difficult to find any time for quality creative thinking. Organization in any operation is important, and for our work as web designers it is important, too. The good news? You don’t have to have been born an organizational machine. Let’s look at what being organized means and a few strategies and tips to help you clean up that messy desk and get your work ducks in a nice neat row.

1. Organization 101

What it means to be an organized person or run an organized business is commonly misunderstood. Many people equate being organized with being fussy, which is not the case. Little labeled folders and neatly itemized lists are one way to stay organized, but they are merely tactics. The heart of organization is having a strategy. Being organized is simply a matter of using clearly defined and consistently implemented systems to get things done.

But how do you go about finding and implementing a strategy if you’re starting from square one? It begins with where you want to end up. Think about where you waste the most time or what frustrates you the most on a daily or weekly basis, and start there. Formulate simple clear goals and treat these overarching goals as the finish line in your strategy.

For example, if you have trouble paying all (and I mean every single one) of your bills on time because they are perpetually lost in the mess on your desk, make it a goal to pay every bill before it is due for the entire year. With this broad goal in mind, you can work on cleaning your desk and setting up a routine for paying each of your bills.


As a web designer, you’re often forced to wear many different hats every day. You’re the CEO, creative director, office manager, coffee fetcher and sometimes even janitor. That’s a lot for anyone, and it certainly makes it difficult to find any time for quality creative thinking. Organization in any operation is important, and for our work as web designers it is important, too. The good news? You don’t have to have been born an organizational machine. Let’s look at what being organized means and a few strategies and tips to help you clean up that messy desk and get your work ducks in a nice neat row.

1. Organization 101

What it means to be an organized person or run an organized business is commonly misunderstood. Many people equate being organized with being fussy, which is not the case. Little labeled folders and neatly itemized lists are one way to stay organized, but they are merely tactics. The heart of organization is having a strategy. Being organized is simply a matter of using clearly defined and consistently implemented systems to get things done.

But how do you go about finding and implementing a strategy if you’re starting from square one? It begins with where you want to end up. Think about where you waste the most time or what frustrates you the most on a daily or weekly basis, and start there. Formulate simple clear goals and treat these overarching goals as the finish line in your strategy.

For example, if you have trouble paying all (and I mean every single one) of your bills on time because they are perpetually lost in the mess on your desk, make it a goal to pay every bill before it is due for the entire year. With this broad goal in mind, you can work on cleaning your desk and setting up a routine for paying each of your bills. Leer más “Organization Tips For Web Designers”