10 of the Most Memorable Marketing Campaigns of 2012


 

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HubSpot’s Inbound Internet Marketing Blog

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As the year comes to a close, it’s the perfect time for reflection. And as marketers, that means we can’t help but think about how our strategies took shape, how we adapted our tactics and techniques, and of course, how successful they all were.

But it’s not enough just to think about how our owncampaigns performed; we should also think about what our fellow marketers did so we can apply their lessons to our future campaigns, too. And let me tell you: The year 2012 brought us some of the most exciting and memorable marketing campaigns. With the Olympics and the presidential election under our belts, 2012 was undoubtedly an exciting year for news, and a lot of that excitement spilled over into campaigns in the marketing industry. Some companies focused on leveraging social media, while others did things that were a little bit more unconventional. Whatever their strategy, the following 10 companies’ campaigns were truly memorable to us, and they’re definitely worth a second look.

Proctor & Gamble: Thank You, Mom

On Mother’s Day 2012, P&G launched a campaign called “Thank You, Mom.” Throughout the campaign, P&G featured Olympic athletes training from a young age, and emphasized the impact their mothers had on their lives. The “Thank You, Mom” campaign also included the “Raising an Olympian” video series to highlight specific athletes’ experiences.

 

 

For a company whose products or services aren’t directly related to sporting goods, P&G generated more coverage for this campaign than a lot of other companies like Nike whose products relate directly to the Olympics. Each “Raising an Olympian” video received close to 1 million views, and the main “Thank You, Mom” video received about 53 million views. Impressive!

Marketers can learn a lot from P&G’s example. Through their effective use of newsjacking, they not only leveraged the popularity of a major, worldwide event, but they also stayed true to the lifestyle of their brand and the audience they cater to. As a result, they were also able to attract a lot of media coverage and thus, reach a global audience. When you’re coming up with your next marketing campaign, think about ways you can expand its reach to more people. Could newsjacking be one of them?

Samsung GALAXY S III: The Next Best Thing Is Already Here

In the summer of 2012, Samsung announced the launch of its newest phone, the GALAXY S III. Around the same time, Apple was also planning the launch of its iPhone 5. Bad timing, eh? So how did a company like Samsung break through the noise of one of the most popular brands around — especially considering it was also a direct competitor? Samsung created a campaign called “The Next Best Thing Is Already Here,” which was very careful not to mention Apple by name while making it obvious that Samsung’s product was superior to the iPhone 5.

 

 

So was it successful? After just one day on the web, the video had been shared 99,294 times, and it generated 2.3 million views. And after three months, it had generated over 17 million views — and was also being shown in movie theaters.

Samsung was strategic in the making and marketing of this video. First, they focused on the true feature differentiation between the two products; something that every potential buyer cares about but is not always emphasized in brands’ marketing. Samsung also made great use of humor to poke fun at Apple addicts in a playful way. And again, while they didn’t even mention the Apple or iPhone name, they made it very obvious to anyone watching that it was the brand they were comparing themselves to. Too often, marketers attack their competitors directly to show their differentiation — which is not something that looks very professional to potential buyers. Think about ways you can show your superiority over competitors while still keeping it clean, like Samsung did.

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The 4 Dumbest Rules That Will Kill Your Company’s Culture


Fast Company
Expert Perspective
BY ROBERTA MATUSON

 
Imagine what a great place the working world could be without these dumb, stupid rules.

It’s hard to imagine that the Olympics would have some dumb, stupid rules, but if this world-class organization can have some, it’s not a stretch that companies have them, too.U.S. gymnast Jordyn Wieber, the reigning world all-around gymnastics champion, cried when she failed to make it to the women’s all-around finals. I can’t say I blame her. Wieber didn’t qualify because of the two-per-country rule, which prior to 2004 was the three-per-country rule.

The rule states that no more than two gymnasts from any country can qualify for the all-around finals, regardless of their score.Some might argue that this rule is a good one, as it gives countries who might not have a chance to medal in the all-around an opportunity to do so. But it’s still a dumb, stupid rule, as we know there is a snowball’s chance in hell these countries will beat out those who are truly the best.

This dumb, stupid rule reminds me of some of the rules I see in corporate America. Let’s begin with the most famous stupid rule of all: the customer is always right.

I learned about this rule early on in my career when I worked at the service desk at Marshalls. We’d have the regulars who would come in at the end of the season and return clothes that were obviously worn, and I do mean worn. We had to refund their money because the customer was always right. I recall a time when a customer tried to return some crazy item that we never sold in our store. You guessed it. The customer was right and we the customer service personnel had to find a place to store this large object.I also recall many a time when customers were down right rude to store personnel. How this was right I will never know! Leer más “The 4 Dumbest Rules That Will Kill Your Company’s Culture”