The Most Dangerous Jobs in Technology

In the world of information technology, some professions are particularly perilous. Whether you’re risking psychological stress or your very life, these fields aren’t for the faint of heart. Some people in these roles thrive on adrenaline, climbing thousands of feet to fix communications towers. Others risk only emotional damage, getting paid to consume disturbing Internet content.

Workplace deaths in the United States have dropped in recent years, along with the employment rate. In the developing world, though, certain countries have a long way to go before some technology-related working conditions can be called humane.

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In the world of information technology, some professions are particularly perilous. Whether you’re risking psychological stress or your very life, these fields aren’t for the faint of heart. Some people in these roles thrive on adrenaline, climbing thousands of feet to fix communications towers. Others risk only emotional damage, getting paid to consume disturbing Internet content.

Workplace deaths in the United States have dropped in recent years, along with the employment rate. In the developing world, though, certain countries have a long way to go before some technology-related working conditions can be called humane. Leer más “The Most Dangerous Jobs in Technology”

Overtime linked with heart risk: study

After accounting for risk factors such as smoking, excessive weight and high cholesterol, doctors found that working between three and four hours of overtime each day was associated with a 60 per cent greater risk compared to those who did no overtime.

Those who worked overtime tended to be slightly younger than the non-overtime group, were more likely to be male than female, and were in a higher occupational grade.


Heart attack
Image via Wikipedia

Study findings … Longer hours can raise the risk of heart problems.

People who work three hours or more of overtime per day run a 60 per cent higher risk of heart problems compared to those who work regular hours, a study published in the European Heart Journal said.

The findings came from a long-term research project into 6014 British civil servants aged 39-61, two-thirds of whom were men, and who had healthy hearts at the start of the probe in the early 1990s. Leer más “Overtime linked with heart risk: study”

Beware of the chair


March 4, 2010

Office worker.Sitting for prolonged periods has been linked to health problems.

The science is in and it’s scary. Sitting down is bad for you – very bad. So much so that some workplaces are starting to act. Lissa Christopher, who wrote this story standing up, reports.

The time has come for office chairs to come with a health warning and ”upholstered, height-adjustable weapons of mass destruction” might not be too much an exaggeration.

Sitting for prolonged periods – and, let’s face it, few places compete with the office when it comes to opportunities to park one’s behind – is now linked to increased risk of premature death, particularly from cardiovascular disease. It is also associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cancer. Leer más “Beware of the chair”

Flexibility key to employee health


Reuters
Image via Wikipedia

Work stress.Stress test … workers with little control over their working conditions experience higher stress levels.

People who have some control over their working hours may be healthier in both mind and body than those in less flexible jobs, according to a US study.

Analysing 10 published studies involving about 16,600 workers, researchers found that certain work conditions that gave employees some control – such as self-scheduling shift work and gradual or partial retirement – were linked to health benefits.

Those benefits included lower blood pressure and heart rate, and better quality sleep and less fatigue during the day.

But the findings, published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, do not prove that flexible work schedules lead to better health although they support the theory that “control at work is good for health,” said the researchers.

Dr. Clare Bambra of Britain’s Durham University said according to that theory, reduced stress may be what bestows the benefits although there are other possibilities as well.

A flexible work schedule might, for instance, make it easier for people to find time for exercise, Bambra told Reuters Health.

For years, studies have found links between “high job strain” and heightened rates of heart disease, depression and other ills. Researchers define high job strain as work that is demanding but allows employees little to no control over how they work.

This has sparked increasing interest in whether there are health benefits to be gained from non-traditional work conditions like self-scheduling, “flextime,” telecommuting from home, and job sharing.

For their review, Bambra and her colleagues used 10 studies that all followed workers for at least six months and had to compare employees with flexible conditions with another group.

But Bambra said a shortcoming of all the studies in the review was that none was a randomized controlled trial.

Bambra said those types of studies “are needed before we can make any real conclusions. The data we have is indicative rather than definitive.”

But she said they found no evidence that flexible work conditions stand to harm employees’ well-being so for now employers and policy makers can consider self-scheduling and gradual retirement to be “plausible means” for promoting employee health.

Reuters

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