The Need to Optimize Human Resource’s Resources | by Jesse de Agustin


by Jesse de Agustin | @emonalytics
Methodology Advisor
http://revealingengagement.com

Measuring subconscious emotional responses are not only useful when engaging a customer group but also when hiring employees. Traditional personality surveys, behavioral questioning, both in discussion and survey formats, and computerized software give limited applicant insight. Applicant tracking systems are powerful tools; yet especially with organization’s increasing emphasis on ensuring culture fit, the face to face interview is critical – because this is where emotion – both conscious and subconscious are center stage. Interviewers might be aware of  how to ‘read’ generalities of body language, but the advice is often incorrect.  For instance, just become someone looks down, doesn’t mean they’re hiding something.

The typical human resources practices are in need of optimization in terms of how they’re targeted at understanding actual human behavior.

Optimizing Human Resource’s Resources

Personality tests are often used in the hiring process, and are typically administered online. They attempt to delve into specific traits that apply to applicant’s behavior at work, and interpersonal behavior. [1] While these tests can be useful for jobs where teamwork is important, applicants can also easily “fake” responses based upon social norms, or what they believe the employer is “looking for.” Moreover, an eye tracking study shows that all ‘dimensions of personality were fakeable.’ Leer más “The Need to Optimize Human Resource’s Resources | by Jesse de Agustin”

Get better data from user studies: 16 interviewing tips

One of my favorite parts of my job is interviewing a huge variety of people about their habits, needs, attitudes, and reactions to designs. I like the challenge of quickly getting strangers to talk freely and frankly about themselves, and to try figuring out new designs and products in front of me. User research shouldn’t be like the boring market surveys they read from clipboards in the mall. Great research interviews should be like listening to Terry Gross on Fresh Air — engaging and insightful. That’s what I aim for. Here are some tips and techniques that have helped me get the most out of user interviews.


Photo by pasukaru76

One of my favorite parts of my job is interviewing a huge variety of people about their habits, needs, attitudes, and reactions to designs. I like the challenge of quickly getting strangers to talk freely and frankly about themselves, and to try figuring out new designs and products in front of me. User research shouldn’t be like the boring market surveys they read from clipboards in the mall. Great research interviews should be like listening to Terry Gross on Fresh Air — engaging and insightful. That’s what I aim for. Here are some tips and techniques that have helped me get the most out of user interviews.

1. Get into character >>> Leer más “Get better data from user studies: 16 interviewing tips”

The Five Levels of Communication in a Connected World

In the digital world in which we live, it has become too easy to send emails, ping people via instant message, text, tweet, etc. Upon reflection, I think I’ve been too haphazard about how I communicate with my colleagues, clients, friends, and family. Oftentimes, an email about a problem should have been a phone call. And sometimes a phone call should have been an in-person meeting.
Knowing what to say and when to say it is not enough. In the modern day, we must decide HOW to communicate.

Consider the five levels of communication:

Level 1: Message into the Ether
Snail mail and email have a few things in common: They can be of any length, and they are not conversational. Emails and letters are sent out, and then new messages are composed and returned. Sometimes it takes days or weeks before a response arrives. Since emails and letters are not conversational (they lump all points together rather than go point, counterpoint, point, etc…), there is a HIGH LEVEL of misunderstanding with this medium of communication. As many of us know, little issues can escalate over email…


In the digital world in which we live, it has become too easy to send emails, ping people via instant message, text, tweet, etc. Upon reflection, I think I’ve been too haphazard about how I communicate with my colleagues, clients, friends, and family. Oftentimes, an email about a problem should have been a phone call. And sometimes a phone call should have been an in-person meeting.
Knowing what to say and when to say it is not enough. In the modern day, we must decide HOW to communicate.

Consider the five levels of communication:
Level 1: Message into the Ether
Snail mail and email have a few things in common: They can be of any length, and they are not conversational. Emails and letters are sent out, and then new messages are composed and returned. Sometimes it takes days or weeks before a response arrives. Since emails and letters are not conversational (they lump all points together rather than go point, counterpoint, point, etc…), there is a HIGH LEVEL of misunderstanding with this medium of communication. As many of us know, little issues can escalate over email… Leer más “The Five Levels of Communication in a Connected World”