“The Definition of Advertising Has Never Been More Unclear” @Adweek CC/ @r2rothenberg


…Source of both opportunity and crisis

For most of the past 100 years, if a marketer said he needed a new advertising campaign, everybody knew what that meant. The machine turned on. The marketer called the agency of record’s account team. The account team composed a brief capturing the strategy and called in the wild and wooly creatives to bring it to life.

The writers and designers applied their art to one or more of these four finite canvases: the television commercial, full-page print ad, radio ad or billboard. Maybe they would sprinkle in a few coupons. The public played along, too; with no ad blockers or DVRs, they just consumed advertising (or ignored it) en masse. It all just worked.

But it doesn’t anymore. Now, there is no machine or even consensus on the basic definition of advertising. And that is the source of both opportunity and crisis.

Today’s media landscape keeps getting more diverse—it’s broadcast, cable and streaming; it’s online, tablet and smartphone; it’s video, rich media, social media, branded content, banners, apps, in-app advertising and interactive technology products like Sherwin-Williams’ Chip It! It’s even physical interactive gear, like Nike+ Fuelband. Pushed an inch farther, the new Google Chromecast dongle could fit under that marketing classification, and the smart watches on the horizon will be yet another platform. Leer más ““The Definition of Advertising Has Never Been More Unclear” @Adweek CC/ @r2rothenberg”

How Much is a Facebook Fan Worth? thnxz to @MarketingPilgrm


If you’re a Facebook brand fan, you’re worth 28% more than you were only three years ago. Doesn’t that make you feel good, to know that your value is rising in the social media world? Right now, you’re averaging about $174 but some brands, like Levis, are ready to hang a much higher price tag around your neck.

Vía http://www.marketingpilgrim.com

Want to know which brands value you more than others? Syncapse has the answer:

SYNCAPSE FACEBOOK VALUE

(The third one down is Monster Energy Drink)

Young, hip brands such as Victoria’s Secret and H&M put the highest value on their Facebook Followers. Old standbys such as CocaCola and Nike, come in under the $100 mark.

What is a Mission Statement? | businessnewsdaily.com


Vía businessnewsdaily.com

A mission statement is a statement declaring the purpose of an organization or company — the reason for this company’s existence. A mission statement provides framework and context to help guide the company’s strategies and actions by spelling out the company’s overall goal. Ultimately, a mission statement helps guide decision-making internally while also articulating the company’s mission to customers, suppliers, and the community.

It’s important to note the distinction between a mission statement and a slogan. A mission statement is not a marketing tool designed to grab attention quickly. While it should be catchy and memorable, a mission statement is a thoughtful declaration designed to articulate the goals and philosophies of a company. A mission statement is also not a business plan. A business plan is an organized outline of your ideas about how the business functions.

A mission statement differs from a vision statement. A mission statement says what the company currently is; a vision statement states what the company hopes to become. A mission statement is also not a business plan. A business plan is an organized outline of your ideas about how the business functions.

A mission statement is not an evergreen statement. As a company evolves over time, the company’s mission and intent may also change. A good rule of thumb is to revisit the mission statement every five years to see if it needs to be fine-tuned or rewritten. A mission statement will keep your company on track, but it shouldn’t become stale or irrelevant.

What does a mission statement include?

Leer más “What is a Mission Statement? | businessnewsdaily.com”

What Might A Social Media Planner Want From A Brand Ambassador | social.ogilvy.com


 

This post first appeared on Leo Ryan’s blog “Burning Head.” 

In the previous post I looked at what sorts of things a social planner might want to ask for when negotiating an event sponsorship. In this post I’ll explore what we might want to agree with a Brand Ambassador. Thanks to @Amymabin and @Vic_newlands for their significant input into to this.

As with the last post, this is not an exhaustive list of what can be done with an ambassador, but rather a check list of the kinds of permissions, rights and access that you might want to request when negotiating the partnership so that we can make the most of the relationship in social media.

Leaving aside all of the difficulties that sponsoring individuals can involve let’s just assume the ambassador is a great brand fit and is largely drugs free. Given this positive connection we’ll probably be trying to create social media occasions to amplify that and broadly this amplification will fall into categories of either paid social media, owned or earned media (although as I wrote this post those categories continued to undermine each other, merge and generally not be as helpful as I’d have liked).

Earned Social Media and what we might want from a brand ambassador
Often it is the case that a brand has developed a relationship with an ambassador not just for their image, but also for their own personal social media audience and reputation. If that’s the case we need to make sure that everyone; the brand, the ambassador, the brand’s followers and importantly the ambassador’s followers are all going to be comfortable with the association and see the benefits of it. Especially the followers.

If we are appointing an ambassador for the size of their audience we also need to be realistic about what that is. On twitter, not all followers are equal. In fact lots might just be porn-bots. There are some incredible audience figures out there; Lady Gaga has more than 33 million followers, Wayne Rooney more than five and a half million and David Cameron’s official Prime Minster’s handle has 2.2 million. Howeveran analysis of their top 100,000 followers by a UK company reveals that only a small percentage of their followers are ‘real’ people: Lady Gaga has only 29% “good” followers, Wayne Rooney 30% and David Cameron 37%. So you might want to do some authentication before paying an ambassador for their audience.

And while we’re on the subject of Wayne Rooney…this time last year Wayne Rooney and Jack Wilshire both tweeted #makeitcount and a link to the Nike campaign website which resulted in their sponsor Nike being censured by the ASA and the footballers being required to delete the tweets. Subsequently the ASA posted this article with the advice that the footballers should have used the hostage #ad or #spon in their tweets.

So with those two caveats in place we might want an ambassador to tweet hashtags related to campaigns and links to campaign sites. Similarly we might want them to share brand assets with their audience in other media specific channels; images up on Picassa, videos on YouTube and so on. Assuming a good fit bewteen the brand’s target audience and the ambassador’s followers, this can be really useful; if these assets are going to be of real value or interest to the ambassador’s audience they may then then re-share them with their networks with all of the added value and credibility that come from a friend’s recommendation. But make sure they are of real value. No quicker way to turn off a social audience than to spam them with unwanted commercial messages, and your ambassador certainly won’t thank you for pissing off their hard earned followers.

To leverage the ambassador’s existing social profile on the brand’s properties you’ll want permission to link to all of their public social profiles, permission to tag them in posts and permission to share their posts when appropriate.

Owned / Paid Social Media and what we might want from a brand ambassador
Recent media options like promoted posts and promoted tweets have made the whole owned / paid distinction a little murky. We can post to our owned Facebook Page audience (which will reach approx 16% of them) and then pay to have that post promoted to reach a larger audience. Of our own existing facebook audience. Which feels a bit like owned media…Promoted tweets are similar except that we can pay for our tweets to go to a new audience who don’t currently follow us, which feels a lot more like paid media, except that it’s also going to our owned audience…sigh. Oh for the days of a 30 second TVC.

Regardless, as a brand we may want to include the ambassador in our owned and paid social media. This could include using their image or quotes in adverts on Facebook or YouTube, but it might also include some of the newer paid media formats; promoted posts posts and promoted tweets. Which begs the question of whose tweets and posts are being promoted; the brand’s or the ambassador’s? If it’s the Brand’s it’s a little more straight forward; clearly there’s a commercial relationship. But if the brand is paying to promote the tweets or posts of the ambassador, we need to be completely transparent and make sure that we clearly signal this as per the Nike example above. Leer más “What Might A Social Media Planner Want From A Brand Ambassador | social.ogilvy.com”

10 of the Most Memorable Marketing Campaigns of 2012


 

red ribbon on finger

HubSpot’s Inbound Internet Marketing Blog

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As the year comes to a close, it’s the perfect time for reflection. And as marketers, that means we can’t help but think about how our strategies took shape, how we adapted our tactics and techniques, and of course, how successful they all were.

But it’s not enough just to think about how our owncampaigns performed; we should also think about what our fellow marketers did so we can apply their lessons to our future campaigns, too. And let me tell you: The year 2012 brought us some of the most exciting and memorable marketing campaigns. With the Olympics and the presidential election under our belts, 2012 was undoubtedly an exciting year for news, and a lot of that excitement spilled over into campaigns in the marketing industry. Some companies focused on leveraging social media, while others did things that were a little bit more unconventional. Whatever their strategy, the following 10 companies’ campaigns were truly memorable to us, and they’re definitely worth a second look.

Proctor & Gamble: Thank You, Mom

On Mother’s Day 2012, P&G launched a campaign called “Thank You, Mom.” Throughout the campaign, P&G featured Olympic athletes training from a young age, and emphasized the impact their mothers had on their lives. The “Thank You, Mom” campaign also included the “Raising an Olympian” video series to highlight specific athletes’ experiences.

 

 

For a company whose products or services aren’t directly related to sporting goods, P&G generated more coverage for this campaign than a lot of other companies like Nike whose products relate directly to the Olympics. Each “Raising an Olympian” video received close to 1 million views, and the main “Thank You, Mom” video received about 53 million views. Impressive!

Marketers can learn a lot from P&G’s example. Through their effective use of newsjacking, they not only leveraged the popularity of a major, worldwide event, but they also stayed true to the lifestyle of their brand and the audience they cater to. As a result, they were also able to attract a lot of media coverage and thus, reach a global audience. When you’re coming up with your next marketing campaign, think about ways you can expand its reach to more people. Could newsjacking be one of them?

Samsung GALAXY S III: The Next Best Thing Is Already Here

In the summer of 2012, Samsung announced the launch of its newest phone, the GALAXY S III. Around the same time, Apple was also planning the launch of its iPhone 5. Bad timing, eh? So how did a company like Samsung break through the noise of one of the most popular brands around — especially considering it was also a direct competitor? Samsung created a campaign called “The Next Best Thing Is Already Here,” which was very careful not to mention Apple by name while making it obvious that Samsung’s product was superior to the iPhone 5.

 

 

So was it successful? After just one day on the web, the video had been shared 99,294 times, and it generated 2.3 million views. And after three months, it had generated over 17 million views — and was also being shown in movie theaters.

Samsung was strategic in the making and marketing of this video. First, they focused on the true feature differentiation between the two products; something that every potential buyer cares about but is not always emphasized in brands’ marketing. Samsung also made great use of humor to poke fun at Apple addicts in a playful way. And again, while they didn’t even mention the Apple or iPhone name, they made it very obvious to anyone watching that it was the brand they were comparing themselves to. Too often, marketers attack their competitors directly to show their differentiation — which is not something that looks very professional to potential buyers. Think about ways you can show your superiority over competitors while still keeping it clean, like Samsung did.

Rodon Group: Cheaper Than China    Leer más “10 of the Most Memorable Marketing Campaigns of 2012”

Advertising on Social Media via Nielsen


 

The Nielsen 2012 State of Social Media report was released earlier last week. I previously went over the report’s findings about the largest social networks of 2012. The report also contains some interesting information about advertising on social media and what it means for consumers.

Consumer Sentiment towards Social Media Advertising

Nielsen found a surprising statistic about consumer sentiment towards social media advertising. Nearly one-third of users believe that ads on social media sites are more annoying than other ads online. Social media isn’t supposed to be annoying. It’s supposed to be meaningful.

There are a few things this statistic tells me. Number one is social integration. In an attempt to make advertising more social, many social networking sites “hide” advertising within other content. An example of this is promoted trends on Twitter. These ad units are tied into other trends and tweets on Twitter. To some consumers, this might appear to be deceptive. The result is an annoyance and distrust of the brand advertising, when it should in fact be upon the social network.

This number also tells me some businesses aren’t using social media advertising correctly. Many social media platforms offer robust targeting options to their advertising. The goal is to display the right ads to the right people. Many businesses fail at this, and the result is irrelevant and sometimes irritating ads. It becomes frustrating when you see an ad in a language you don’t speak, an area you don’t live in (I’ve had ads for NYC bars in Facebook), and when the ads surely shouldn’t be targeting someone your age. Businesses can avoid this frustration by developing targeting strategies that make sense.

Finally, there is the aspect of spam and quality businesses advertising. For example, I have noticed a big drop in quality brands advertising on Facebook. The more lesser quality businesses advertising on a site, the less likely consumers will find these ads trustworthy and relate able. The result is a drop in engagement and an increase in frustration. It’s up to social media sites to develop ways to increase the quality of ads being served on their own sites.

Consumer Actions after Seeing Social Media Advertising Leer más “Advertising on Social Media via Nielsen”

4 spots que han causado sensación esta semana


 

MERCADOTECNIA PUBLICIDAD | Revista Merca2.0

por EVELYN CASTILLEJOS
Londres, Reino Unido.-
 Ad brands presenta cuatro anuncios que han causado sensación en los úlitmos días.

Los spots son muy variados, pues mientras uno hace reflexionar sobre la hambruna infantil, otro nos deleita con el asombro de las personas cuando ven “bailar” a los objetos de un supermercado. Y qué decir de la fotografía que se puede capturar con una buena cámara y de la presencia de un robot que se siente cansado por manejar tantos datos.

Te presentamos los cuatro spots. Que los disfrutes.

Canon: Inspired

Agencia: Grey New York

Red Stripe: Corner Shop Leer más “4 spots que han causado sensación esta semana”