Association of National Advertisers and Nielsen – @Nielsen

ABOUT THE ANA

Founded in 1910, the Association of National Advertisers leads the marketing community by providing its members with insights, collaboration and advocacy. ANA’s membership includes more than 525 companies with 10,000 brands that collectively spend more than $250 billion in marketing and advertising. The ANA strives to communicate marketing best practices, lead industry initiatives, influence industry practices, manage industry affairs, and advance, promote, and protect all advertisers and marketers. For more information, visithttp://www.ana.net, follow us on Twitter, or join us on Facebook.

ABOUT NIELSEN

Nielsen Holdings N.V. (NYSE: NLSN) is a global information and measurement company with leading market positions in marketing and consumer information, television and other media measurement, online intelligence and mobile measurement. Nielsen has a presence in approximately 100 countries, with headquarters in New York, USA, and Diemen, the Netherlands. For more information, visit http://www.nielsen.com.

PRESS CONTACTS:

CooperKatz & Company for the ANA: Marcus Hardy; (917) 595-3043; mhardy@cooperkatz.com
CooperKatz & Company for the ANA: Luna Newton; (917) 595-3061; lnewton@cooperkatz.com
Nielsen: Anne-Taylor Adams; (646) 654-5759; annetaylor.adams@nielsen.com

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Media spend attributed to multi-screen advertising campaigns is expected to grow from 20 percent of budgets today to 50 percent in the next three years, according to a new study by ANA (Association of National Advertisers) and Nielsen conducted among client-side marketers, agencies and media sellers. Multi-screen campaigns were defined as those that run during a similar timeframe across two or more screens including TV, computer, tablet, mobile phone and digital place-based media.

Emphasizing the significance of multi-screen advertising campaigns, 48 percent said they believe these campaigns are very important in effectively delivering marketing messages today.  And a vast majority of those surveyed (88 percent), predict that multi-screen campaigns will be very important in three years.

“Measurement is the biggest issue that will influence the rate of growth for multi-screen advertising,” said Bill Duggan, Group Executive Vice President of the ANA. “The industry needs to adopt measures that are consistent, comparable, and combinable across screens to provide a complete picture of a campaign’s effectiveness.”

Image representing Nielsen as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

“At Nielsen we work closely with our clients to help them deploy consistent, multi-platform measurement against their advertising initiatives, so these findings confirm what we’re already seeing in the market. The potential for marketers and the industry as a whole is significant as multi-platform measurement is embraced in the marketplace,” said Randall Beard, Head of Global Advertiser Solutions for Nielsen.

“We at Nielsen are committed to providing multi-platform measurement capabilities in order to make marketing spend more effective and to grow the industry as a whole. Studies like this done in collaboration with respected industry organizations like the ANA are incredibly useful for those of us who are tasked with developing the next-generation measurement tools that inform the important decisions marketers, agencies and media sellers are making every day,” said Megan Clarken, Executive Vice President of Global Product Leadership for Nielsen.

THE IMPORTANCE OF MEASUREMENT Leer más “Association of National Advertisers and Nielsen – @Nielsen”

2012 Digital Music Sales on Pace to Break Record



So far this year, digital album sales in the U.S. are up 15 percent from the same period last year. And Americans have already purchased one billion digital tracks, a pace that is set to break 2011’s record of 1.3 billion sold, according to Nielsen.  A look back at music sales over the past few years found that the explosion of devices on the market– such as smartphones and tablets– and their increasing role in consumers’ everyday lives has played a major factor in the growth of digital music.

Digital Music Timeline v1 (1) Leer más “2012 Digital Music Sales on Pace to Break Record”

Chile, Colombia Lead Latin American Internet, Cable Penetration

“Brazil’s economic growth is driving consumption across most sectors as consumers have more money to spend, so this rise is not so surprising,” said Roberto Vazquez Ferrero, Managing Director of the telecom practice at Nielsen Latin America.

Internet penetration in Colombia was up five points to 29% while in Mexico, it rose three points to 24%.

Televisions are now ubiquitous in the four countries, with 98% of homes owning them. Colombia is far-and-away the leader when it comes to cable TV – 81% of households have subscriptions. Half (51%) of Chilean households subscribe to cable. Meanwhile, just one-quarter of Brazilian homes and one-third of Mexican homes have cable.

“The main barrier to cable penetration is the cost of service. I would expect cable penetration to rise in Brazil in the near term. In Mexico, there are many cable operators with differing services. As they package them in ways that combine TV and Internet, such as the double and triple play packages, we could see greater penetration as competition leads to lower prices,” said Vazquez.


Latin America endured the global recession much better than North America or Europe, and today it stands out as one of the stronger regions for economic growth.  The Nielsen Company recently conducted a study of four countries – Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico – to see how the increased affluence of consumers there has affected media penetration rates.

Chile led the group when it came to ownership of home computers and Internet penetration.  Computer ownership was up five points from the previous year to 57% and Internet penetration hit 41%, an increase of six points.  The biggest jumps, however, came from Brazil, where more than half (51%) of households now own computers, up from just 26% the year before, and Internet penetration rose 13 points to 31%. Leer más “Chile, Colombia Lead Latin American Internet, Cable Penetration”

U.S. Smartphone Battle Heats Up: Which is the “Most Desired” Operating System?

Most Desired Operating Systems (OS):
When mobile users who planned to upgrade to a smartphone in the next year were asked about their next phone, Apple’s iOS and Android were tied for “most desired” operating system.

* Among users planning to get a new smartphone, current smartphone owners showed a preference for the Apple iPhone (35 percent), while 28 percent of both smartphone and featurephone planned smartphone upgraders indicated they wanted a device with an Android operating system as their next mobile phone.
* Featurephone owners planning to get a smartphone are less likely to have made up their mind about the OS they will choose: 25 percent were “not sure” what their next desired OS might be compared to 13 percent of smartphone owners. Those over 55 were markedly less certain than younger mobile users, with 27.8 saying they weren’t sure what kind of device they wanted next, compared to 12.2 percent of those 18 to 24.
* Apple’s iPhone and devices with the Android operating system were the “most desired” among likely smartphone upgraders, with Apple showing a slight lead among those age 55+ , 18 to 24, and 25 to 34.
* Women planning to get a smartphone are more likely to want an iPhone as their next device, with slightly more males preferring Android.


http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/us-smartphone-battle-heats-up/

According to October 2010 data from The Nielsen Company, 29.7 percent of U.S. mobile subscribers now own smartphones that run full operating systems.

The most popular smartphones are the Apple iPhone and RIM Blackberry, which are caught in a statistical dead heat with 27 percent of smartphone market share in the U.S. Twenty-two percent of smartphone owners have devices with the Android operating system.

U.S. Market & Smartphone Market

Most Desired Operating Systems (OS):
When mobile users who planned to upgrade to a smartphone in the next year were asked about their next phone, Apple’s iOS and Android were tied for “most desired” operating system.

  • Among users planning to get a new smartphone, current smartphone owners showed a preference for the Apple iPhone (35 percent), while 28 percent of both smartphone and featurephone planned smartphone upgraders indicated they wanted a device with an Android operating system as their next mobile phone.
  • Featurephone owners planning to get a smartphone are less likely to have made up their mind about the OS they will choose: 25 percent were “not sure” what their next desired OS might be compared to 13 percent of smartphone owners. Those over 55 were markedly less certain than younger mobile users, with 27.8 saying they weren’t sure what kind of device they wanted next, compared to 12.2 percent of those 18 to 24.
  • Apple’s iPhone and devices with the Android operating system were the “most desired” among likely smartphone upgraders, with Apple showing a slight lead among those age 55+ , 18 to 24, and 25 to 34.
  • Women planning to get a smartphone are more likely to want an iPhone as their next device, with slightly more males preferring Android. Leer más “U.S. Smartphone Battle Heats Up: Which is the “Most Desired” Operating System?”

What Americans Do Online: Social Media And Games Dominate Activity

Portals remain as the second heaviest activity on mobile Internet (11.6 percent share of time), despite their double digit decline and social networking’s rise to account for 10.5 percent share means the gap is much smaller than a year ago (14.3 percent vs. 8.3 percent).

Other mobile Internet activities seeing significant growth include music and video/movies, both seeing 20 percent plus increases in share of activity year over year. As these destinations gain share, it’s at the cost of other content consumption – both news/current events and sports destinations saw more than a 20 percent drop in share of U.S. mobile Internet time.

“Although we see similar characteristics amongst PC and mobile internet use, the way their activity is allocated is still pretty contrasting, added Martin. While convergence will continue, the unique characteristics of computers and mobiles, both in their features and when and where they are used mean that mobile Internet behavior mirroring its PC counterpart is still some way off.”

NOTE: This piece of research looked at the share of all U.S. Internet time each of the 84 “standard” NetView subcategories/sectors holds. Only the top 10 sectors were actually called out, the remaining 74 were grouped into “other” and not called out.

The Mobile Internet data is derived from a survey which tracks self-reported mobile internet usage from over 5,000 respondents each month. Mobile internet universe is defined as people that they have used the mobile internet, email or instant messaging on their mobile phone in the past 30 days. The Mobile internet data is weighted back to benchmarks for age, gender, income, race/ethnicity and operator share collected in Mobile Insights.


http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/what-americans-do-online-social-media-and-games-dominate-activity/

Text and graphics updated Aug. 6 to clarify category definitions, timeframe and methodology (see note at bottom)

Americans spend nearly a quarter of their time online on social networking sites and blogs, up from 15.8 percent just a year ago (43 percent increase) according to new research released today from The Nielsen Company. The research revealed that Americans spend a third their online time (36 percent) communicating and networking across social networks, blogs, personal email and instant messaging.

Top 10 Sectors by Share of U.S. Internet Time
RANK Category Share of Time
June 2010
Share of Time
June 2009
% Change in
Share of Time
1 Social Networks 22.7% 15.8% 43%
2 Online Games 10.2% 9.3% 10%
3 E-mail 8.3% 11.5% -28%
4 Portals 4.4% 5.5% -19%
5 Instant Messaging 4.0% 4.7% -15%
6 Videos/Movies** 3.9% 3.5% 12%
7 Search 3.5% 3.4% 1%
8 Software Manufacturers 3.3% 3.3% 0%
9 Multi-category Entertainment 2.8% 3.0% -7%
10 Classifieds/Auctions 2.7% 2.7% -2%
Other* 34.3% 37.3% -8%
Source:Nielsen NetView – June 2009-June 2010
*Other refers to 74 remaining online categories visited from PC/laptops
**NetView’s Videos/Movies category refers to time spent on video-specific (e.g., YouTube, Bing Videos, Hulu) and movie-related websites (e.g., IMDB, MSN Movies and Netflix) only. It is not a measure of video streaming or inclusive of video streaming on non-video-specific or movie-specific websites (e.g., streamed video on sports or news sites).

“Despite the almost unlimited nature of what you can do on the web, 40 percent of U.S. online time is spent on just three activities – social networking, playing games and emailing leaving a whole lot of other sectors fighting for a declining share of the online pie,” said Nielsen analyst Dave Martin. Leer más “What Americans Do Online: Social Media And Games Dominate Activity”

The Connected Devices Age: iPads, Kindles, Smartphones and the Connected Consumer

The growing popularity of connected devices, from tablet computers like the Apple iPad to smartphones, portable games players, and eBook readers like the Kindle and Nook, is already changing how some consumers engage with media. It is also creating new opportunities and challenges for a broad range of companies. Publishers, media companies and application developers are eager to know whether they should optimize their content for particular devices. Advertisers want to understand how these devices might eventually fit into their overall marketing plans. Carriers want to know how to evolve their business models in a multi-connection world. And device manufacturers need to understand how consumers are using connected devices so they can improve their products, fine-tune their marketing and win the battle for market share.

Nielsen’s new Connected Devices Playbook surveys more than 5,000 consumers who already own a tablet computer, eReader, netbook, media player or smartphone – including 400 iPad owners. Below are some of the findings of the Playbook shared today at Advertising Week.


The growing popularity of connected devices, from tablet computers like the Apple iPad to smartphones, portable games players, and eBook readers like the Kindle and Nook, is already changing how some consumers engage with media. It is also creating new opportunities and challenges for a broad range of companies. Publishers, media companies and application developers are eager to know whether they should optimize their content for particular devices. Advertisers want to understand how these devices might eventually fit into their overall marketing plans.  Carriers want to know how to evolve their business models in a multi-connection world. And device manufacturers need to understand how consumers are using connected devices so they can improve their products, fine-tune their marketing and win the battle for market share.

Nielsen’s  new Connected Devices Playbook surveys more than 5,000 consumers who already own a tablet computer, eReader, netbook, media player or smartphone – including 400 iPad owners. Below are some of the findings of the Playbook shared today at Advertising Week.

http://www.youtube.com/v/g3shYGp-RuU&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3

Who owns connected devices?

  • iPad owners skew younger and more male.  Sixty-five percent of them are male and 63 percent of them are under the age of 35.
  • Kindle owners tend to be wealthier.  Forty-four percent of them make more than $80,000/year compared to 39 percent of iPad owners and 37 percent of iPhone owners.  They also tend to have more education: 27 percent of Kindle owners have Master’s degrees or doctorates.

The iPad skews younger and male

How receptive are they to advertising? Leer más “The Connected Devices Age: iPads, Kindles, Smartphones and the Connected Consumer”

How The Nielsen Company Uses Idea Management Software to Drive Innovation

We’ve heard a lot about how idea management works in theory – but how does it work in practice? Ann Marie Dumais, Senior Vice President of New Product Introductions at The Nielsen Company, was kind enough to walk us through Nielsen’s use of BrightIdea for enterprise idea management. Here are the lessons we came away with.
When Selecting Your Platform, Know What You’re Looking For

Dumais said Nielsen decided to adopt idea management software because it wanted to put process around thoughts. That may seem a bit corporate. OK, that sounds ridiculously corporate. But considering the company had found that it had no shortage of ideas coming from staff and no good means to do anything with them, it makes sense. The company wanted to drive ideation faster, and didn’t want to chase ideas that had already been considered.

Dumais said they needed something flexible – something that would enable them to make changes on the fly by themselves, without calling IT or an external vendor. She also needed something that would be easy for all staff, including those dealing with the backend. “It had to be like eBay,” she said “No one had to teach us how to use eBay – it just works.” Dumais also knew the system would have to support single sign-on.

After vetting several possibilities, Dumais and her team settled on BrightIdea because of its flexibility and usability.


By Klint Finley |  //www.readwriteweb.com

This post is part of our ReadWriteEnterprise channel, which is a resource and guide for IT managers and technologists in the Enterprise. The channel is sponsored by Intel. As you’re exploring solutions for your enterprise, check out this helpful resource from our sponsors: All New 2010 Intel Core vPro Processors and Microsoft Office 2010: Your Best Choice for Business PCs

We’ve heard a lot about how idea management works in theory – but how does it work in practice? Ann Marie Dumais, Senior Vice President of New Product Introductions at The Nielsen Company, was kind enough to walk us through Nielsen’s use of BrightIdea for enterprise idea management. Here are the lessons we came away with.

When Selecting Your Platform, Know What You’re Looking For

Dumais said Nielsen decided to adopt idea management software because it wanted to put process around thoughts. That may seem a bit corporate. OK, that sounds ridiculously corporate. But considering the company had found that it had no shortage of ideas coming from staff and no good means to do anything with them, it makes sense. The company wanted to drive ideation faster, and didn’t want to chase ideas that had already been considered.

Dumais said they needed something flexible – something that would enable them to make changes on the fly by themselves, without calling IT or an external vendor. She also needed something that would be easy for all staff, including those dealing with the backend. “It had to be like eBay,” she said “No one had to teach us how to use eBay – it just works.” Dumais also knew the system would have to support single sign-on.

After vetting several possibilities, Dumais and her team settled on BrightIdea because of its flexibility and usability. Leer más “How The Nielsen Company Uses Idea Management Software to Drive Innovation”