5 things iOS can learn from Android | via iDownloadBlog.com


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It’s no secret that both Sebastien and I purchased Nexus 7 devices from Google. We may have differing reasons for our purchases, but one reason we share in common is the desire to see how Google is performing in the tablet space. This is especially so with the Nexus, since it’s the flagship that’s guaranteed to run stock Android with no additives or preservatives.

The Nexus 7 is the first Nexus device I’ve owned, and I’ve come away quite impressed; read my thoughts on the Nexus 7 for more details on that. I’ve even been able to identify a few things that Google is doing well, and that Apple could stand to learn from. Items like widgets, and offline dictation, to name just a few…

Widgets

Widgets have been a key differentiating factor between Android and iOS from a very early age, but I always felt I understood why Apple avoided them. a). They tend to looked cluttered and messy, and b). Who really needs an Android styled clock widget when you have a clock on the status bar?

But the Nexus 7 made me realized that Widgets are more than just ugly clocks littering the Home screen just for the sake of claiming customizability. Widgets could actually be extremely useful; for example, the RSS widgets. Those are ridiculously nice, and I find myself using them all the time. As much as I’m always hitting up Reeder on my iPhone to stay updated with the latest feeds, having live updates right on my Home screen makes me a little jealous that this feature isn’t available on iOS.

Offline Dictation Leer más “5 things iOS can learn from Android | via iDownloadBlog.com”

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Google Now: lo que necesitas saber, cuando necesitas saberlo


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Hoy Google se puso a una buena altura en su presentación de Google I/O en San Francisco, tanto figurada como literalmente, tirándose desde un avión para presentarGoogle Glass, luego pasando a Android 4.1 Jelly Bean y su tablet Nexus 7. Dentro de las novedades de Jelly Bean encontramos Google Now, que convierte a tu Android en la agenda que siempre vas a querer tener en el bolsillo.

Imagina que no tienes que organizar tu información o recordatorios. Leer más “Google Now: lo que necesitas saber, cuando necesitas saberlo”

The Android Nexus 7 Tablet (and Jelly Bean) Explained


 

This post is part of our ReadWriteMobile channel, which is dedicated to helping its community understand the strategic business and technical implications of developing mobile applications. This channel is sponsored by Alcatel-Lucent.
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readwriteweb.com | By Dan Rowinski 

For years, consumers have been looking for an alternative to the iPad. The obvious place has been Android, but in reality nothing really stood up against Apple’s mighty slate. Either the price was too high, or it came with a contract from a wireless carrier, or it just wasn’t good enough. Samsung, HTC, Motorola, LG and a host of other companies tried to make great Android tablets at reasonable prices, and each achieved varying degrees of failure. A quick look at Google’s new Nexus 7 tablet shows us it has the potential to not just best all the other Android slates on the market – and Amazon’s Kindle Fire – but perhaps even challenge the dominance of the iPad.

Android Jelly Bean

Google did not build Android originally with the thought of putting it on tablets. To this point, it has been a struggle for any Android device that is not a smartphone to really look great and function well on a tablet. Theoretically, that was supposed to change in February 2011 when Google announced Android 3.0 Honeycomb, designed specifically for tablets. The first iteration of a Honeycomb tablet was the Xoom, created by Motorola.

It was basically terrible.

Android apps on the Xoom did not look or perform well on the device. It was clunky and did not perform as well as its impressive hardware specifications promised it should. And it was expensive. It started at $899 unless you wanted to tie it to a two-year contract from Verizon, in which case it was $699. It was a consumer dud and partially ruined the demand for tablets.

Other Android tablets that have come since have not been much better. Samsung has a variety of Galaxy-branded tablets that are all ho-hum devices. Other tablets ran Android versions like Gingerbread 2.3, which were not intended for larger screen sizes.

What has changed? Foremost, Google combined the development of Android apps to be compatible with both smartphones and tablets when it released Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich late in 2011. In terms of tablet user interface, Ice Cream Sandwich was a big jump for Android. Yet, to this point, there are no meaningful tablets running ICS.

That is why the Nexus 7 is incredibly important. It will ship with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and be optimized to the newest version of the operating system. That means that it should run apps on bigger tablet screens as the developers intended them to be used. It will have all the Android goodness that people like, such as live widgets (which are now responsive to a particular home screen’s real estate), dynamic sharing abilities through Google Beam, and a user interface that is easier to use, more intuitive than Honeycomb ever was and generally superior to everything that came before it. Jelly Bean should be the new standard for Android tablets, and in that, consumers, developers and Google all win.  Leer más “The Android Nexus 7 Tablet (and Jelly Bean) Explained”