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Smooth! ‘Mad Men’-Era Newsweek Covers & Accompanying Ads (PHOTOS)

The front-cover/back-cover pairings are also revealing: you’ll notice that each lovingly photographed drop of honeyed Scotch was only a flip of the magazine away from a story of national or international “news-significance,” per the publication’s original parlance. The Kennedy assassination. The rise of Brezhnev. Race relations in Harlem. And so on. It’s almost as if the changes of the 1960s were so sudden, and so serious, that our ancestors had no choice but to kick back with a snifter of Chivas Regal at the end of yet another long week.

Don Draper would have been right there with them



Courtesy of AMC (Don Draper)
thedailybeast.com
By Andrew Romano

Glance at the back cover of a Newsweek nowadays and you’re bound to see an ad for a bank. Or a TV show.

Or maybe a fancy watch. But if you’d turned over a copy of the magazine back in 1964, you probably would have seen a promotion for one of two products, neither of which appears in our pages very much (or at all) anymore: cigarettes or alcohol. Leer más “Smooth! ‘Mad Men’-Era Newsweek Covers & Accompanying Ads (PHOTOS)”

‘Newsweek’ vuelve a los años 60 para conmemorar lo nuevo de Mad Men

Pero no sólo la portada echa la vista atrás a los años de oro de la publicidad. Desde el editorial hasta la publicidad del número de Newsweek del 26 de marzo podrán verse diseños propios de 1965 que harán que el lector se sienta de vuelta a la época de Mad Men por momentos.


marketingdirecto.com

Newsweek

estrenará portada retro la próxima semana.
La publicación ha vuelto a los años 60 con su nueva portada inspirada en Mad Men, a la que acompañará un reportaje , “Mad Men vuelve a la oficina”, sobre la vuelta de la serie a la pequeña pantalla el 25 de marzo, más de un año y medio después de que terminara la última temporada.


Is Consumerism Killing Our Creativity?

Have you ever fallen into a black hole of comparison shopping? You’re looking for a new digital camera, for instance. You head over to Cnet.com and read some reviews of various cameras, watch the video demos, identify the model you want. Then perhaps you employ Google’s shopping search to price out the options and find the best deal. All of the sudden, it’s four hours later. You’ve found the perfect camera, but your purchasing triumph is tainted by a creeping feeling of, well, disgust. Couldn’t that time have been used better?I was thinking recently about what my biggest distractions were – the things keeping me from pushing my creative projects forward. As I scanned through my daily activities, I found that the most insidious distraction was, in fact, things. More specifically, the wanting, hunting, and getting of things – whether they be tangible (a new computer) or intangible (information).


article

by Jocelyn K. Glei

Have you ever fallen into a black hole of comparison shopping? You’re looking for a new digital camera, for instance. You head over to Cnet.com and read some reviews of various cameras, watch the video demos, identify the model you want. Then perhaps you employ Google’s shopping search to price out the options and find the best deal. All of the sudden, it’s four hours later. You’ve found the perfect camera, but your purchasing triumph is tainted by a creeping feeling of, well, disgust. Couldn’t that time have been used better?I was thinking recently about what my biggest distractions were – the things keeping me from pushing my creative projects forward. As I scanned through my daily activities, I found that the most insidious distraction was, in fact, things. More specifically, the wanting, hunting, and getting of things –  whether they be tangible (a new computer) or intangible (information). Leer más “Is Consumerism Killing Our Creativity?”

Companies in Brief


Barnes & Noble: After Booking Losses, a Bookseller on Sale

Yielding to pressure from investors as a shift to digital books hits the bottom line, the biggest U.S. bookstore chain has put itself on the block. In May billionaire Ron Burkle, who owns 19 percent of Barnes & Noble (BKS), launched a lawsuit seeking to invalidate the bookseller’s “poison pill” defense against takeovers to boost the value of his holding; the sale could give him what he wants. Chairman Leonard Riggio, B&N’s biggest shareholder, says he may join with a group that will bid for the company. In June the chain forecast a possible loss of 40 cents a share for the current fiscal year due to a $140 million investment in its digital book unit.

—By David Rocks, Edited by James E. Ellis Leer más “Companies in Brief”