Sony, News Corp. extend tradition of watching the news in public

At a time when millions of New Yorkers prefer to listen to their news (or news podcasts) within their own personal digital cocoons, it’s worth remembering that the biggest media events of the 20th century were consumed collectively, in crowds, while we stood on the sidewalk.
When Allied troops stormed the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944, thousands of people found out by watching the famous “Zipper” in Times Square. And in February 1962, when John Glenn became the first human to orbit the Earth, 4,000 people packed the floors of Grand Central Terminal on 42nd Street to watch the event on a 12-by-16-foot screen that CBS had set up over the ticket counter. People could just as easily have gotten this news from newspapers, radio or (in Glenn’s case) TV, but there’s something about sharing the news with a crowd that helps to stamp it on our national consciousness.


By Robert Klara

SonyAt a time when millions of New Yorkers prefer to listen to their news (or news podcasts) within their own personal digital cocoons, it’s worth remembering that the biggest media events of the 20th century were consumed collectively, in crowds, while we stood on the sidewalk.
When Allied troops stormed the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944, thousands of people found out by watching the famous “Zipper” in Times Square. And in February 1962, when John Glenn became the first human to orbit the Earth, 4,000 people packed the floors of Grand Central Terminal on 42nd Street to watch the event on a 12-by-16-foot screen that CBS had set up over the ticket counter. People could just as easily have gotten this news from newspapers, radio or (in Glenn’s case) TV, but there’s something about sharing the news with a crowd that helps to stamp it on our national consciousness. Leer más “Sony, News Corp. extend tradition of watching the news in public”

The Guardian abre su contenido a los bloggers

The Guardian, uno de los medios masivos más abiertos a experimentar con nuevas fórmulas de periodismo, ha creado una plataforma que permite reproducir sus artículos directamente en blogs y medios externos.

El periódico ha desarrollado un plug-in en Wordpress para reproducir su contenido en blogs. Cada artículo lleva incrustado publicidad, comercializada por The Guardian.

De esta forma, su contenido se difunde por Internet de manera legal a la vez que abre una nueva fórmula de monetización.


por Marcus Hurst

News-Feed1

The Guardian, uno de los medios masivos más abiertos a experimentar con nuevas fórmulas de periodismo, ha creado una plataforma que permite reproducir sus artículos directamente en blogs y medios externos.

El periódico ha desarrollado un plug-in en WordPress para reproducir su contenido en blogs. Cada artículo lleva incrustado publicidad, comercializada por The Guardian.

De esta forma, su contenido se difunde por Internet de manera legal a la vez que abre una nueva fórmula de monetización. Leer más “The Guardian abre su contenido a los bloggers”

FT ComMetrics Blog Index 2009


Just a few years ago, companies had hardly considered blogs as a viable option for corporate communication. Today, they are getting ever more attention. Some of it has been applied in the last six months.

This is the latest version of the FT ComMetrics Blog Index – FTCBI – we update it regularly. If you wish to have a look at the FTCBI that was published in the Financial Times please visit:

FT ComMetrics Blog Index – 2009-05-14

Rank Company RSS
1 Google 100 8 0 0 652305 186946
2 Viacom 33 6 0 0 1062705 23126
3 Adobe 25 6 0 0 37262 24795
4 Nokia 23 7 0 0 236757 9100
5 Microsoft 21 8 0 0 44514 1009
6 Yahoo! 20 7 0 0 29072 5380
7 Dell 19 7 0 0 77 4900
8 eBay 18 6 0 0 29700 6178
9 Reuters 17 6 0 0 263907 21
10 News Corporation 16 6 0 0 12890 1585
10 American Express 16 6 0 0 5289 2536
12 Cisco 15 6 0 0 34168 142
12 Boeing 15 6 0 0 29643 324
12 Johnson & Johnson 15 6 0 0 18221 342
12 Amazon 15 6 0 0 7521 36
12 General Electric 15 6 0 0 6984 267
12 Oracle 15 6 0 0 5655 325
12 Toyota 15 6 0 0 5435 205
12 Coca-Cola 15 6 0 0 5186 267
12 Time Warner 15 6 0 0 3721 55
12 Hewlett Packard 15 6 0 0 3485 0
12 Wells Fargo 15 6 0 0 1398 75
12 Telenor Group 15 6 0 0 750 4
12 Accenture 15 6 0 0 299 3
12 E.ON 15 6 0 0 37 0
12 Alcoa 15 6 0 0 30 2
27 Daimler 13 5 0 0 24296 312
27 InBev 13 5 0 0 22266 123
27 Siemens 13 5 0 0 19252 46
27 EMC 13 5 0 0 15429 301
27 Emerson Electric 13 5 0 0 7269 220
27 Nike 13 5 0 0 5611 325
33 Berkshire Hathaway 12 5 0 0 7906 39
33 Fedex 12 5 0 0 4274 82
33 BNP Paribas 12 5 0 0 4153 38
33 GM 12 5 0 0 3818 261
33 Deutsche Telekom 12 5 0 0 2613 15
33 France Telecom 12 5 0 0 2242 32
33 Wal-Mart 12 5 0 0 2193 145
33 Chevron 12 5 0 0 369 14
33 Johnson Controls 12 5 0 0 340 9
33 GlaxoSmithKline 12 5 0 0 106 15
33 Ericsson 12 5 0 0 73 0
33 IBM 12 5 0 0 30 0
33 Royal Bank of Canada 12 5 0 0 23 4
33 SAP 12 5 0 0 7 0
33 Henkel 12 5 0 0 0 22
33 Volvo 12 5 0 0 0 4
49 BBVA 10 4 0 0 23796 326
49 BASF 10 4 0 0 9339 19
49 Telia Sonera 10 4 0 0 8415 74
49 Samsung 10 4 0 0 5187 17
49 Swisscom 10 4 0 0 4127 32
49 Bank of America 10 4 0 0 1020 28
49 Cadbury Schweppes 10 4 0 0 729 23
49 Procter & Gamble 10 4 0 0 609 10
49 Petro Canada 10 4 0 0 496 24
49 Sony 10 4 0 0 244 2
59 Kraft Foods 8 3 0 0 1832 34
59 Telstra 8 3 0 0 501 6
59 Sygenta 8 3 0 0 334 0
59 Deutsche Bank 8 3 0 0 112 1
59 Fiat 8 3 0 0 32 0
59 Aviva 8 3 0 0 25 0
65 Nissan 5 2 0 0 23600 211
65 ABB 5 2 0 0 184 2
65 Novo Nordisk 5 2 0 0 69 3
65 Unilever 5 2 0 0 38 0
65 Royal/Dutch Shell 5 2 0 0 23 0
65 Centrica 5 2 0 0 7 0
71 McDonald’s 0 0 0 0 8103 334
71 ING 0 0 0 0 4760 37
71 Verizon Communications 0 0 0 0 3279 47
71 Renault 0 0 0 0 674 46
71 Arcelor Mittal 0 0 0 0 433 6
71 Nestlé 0 0 0 0 37 1
71 UPS 0 0 0 0 0 0

© ComMetrics – CyTRAP Labs GmbH 2009-05-13.

    Note. Some of the calculations used in this table draw upon publicly available information that has not been independently investigated by ComMetrics – a division of CyTRAP Labs GmbH. Other data were independently investigated and collected by ComMetrics. Rankings do not represent a guarantee of future performance for blogs.
    In the case of several blogs from one company (e.g., Daimler, Dell, Google, Oracle and Wal-Mart), the highest ranking one is included in this list.Check out more about the methodology used and composite indices applied.
    Blogs that require registration to gain access are NOT included in this list because gated communities do not follow the Internet’s philosophy of making information freely and easily available to the public.
    Methododology.
    The FT ComMetrics Blog Index ranks the effectiveness of the corporate blogs of the top 75 companies from the US, Europe and the rest of the world listed on the FT Global 500 2008 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              500 2008      end_of_the_skype_highlighting.
    To create the table, the highest-scoring corporate blog is given a ComMetrics Footprint score of 100, and other scores are recalculated as a percentage in relation to that top score. The corporation with an overall score of 100 is therefore not necessarily top in every category; rather, it has accumulated the highest composite score.
    To arrive at a corporation’s rank, we examine the data for each indicator and standardize the value for each about its mean using z-scores. All criteria are then aggregated and re-standardized. The following categories are used in the table of raw data.
    Google PageRank interprets web links and assigns a numerical weighting to each site.
    Technorati Authority analyses the number of links to a blog from other sites.
    Technorati Ranking rates blogs according to authority and popularity.
    Yahoo! InLinks monitors links to a blog.
    Google Blog Search is a search engine for blogs that produces lists of results, the
    ComMetrics Footprint is the rankings we calculate using the above indicators.

What will happen during the current economic downturn? Tough recessionary times would suggest that more emphasis should be placed on this effective communications medium. We’ll keep you posted.

P.S. – Some would say that there are no good indicators other than a site’s own unique visitor numbers and bounce rate. However,  these measures are increasingly inaccurate when attempting to determine the value derived from non revenue-generating activities like blogging. Of course, the indicators and composite indices we provide above may not give you the whole truth and nothing but the truth either.

Thus, data do help demonstrate a trend and while the difference between 90 versus 120 backlinks may be real, it is not necessarily something to worry about. Still, if your backlinks dropped or your competitors’ backlinks improved significantly within the last six months, then getting your social media budget approved probably just got more difficult. Unless you can show how this will help to move your blog up in the rankings.

http://ftindex.commetrics.com/

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Relevence, relationships and the ridiculous dominate opening day of We Media ‘10


Alan Webber and Michael Wolff at We MediaAlan Webber and Michael Wolff at We Media. ‘Journalism is not a public service, not a public good,’ Wolff said. ‘Journalism is not social work.’ Photo by Chelsea Matiash

By Steve Klein
and Suzanne McBride

Almost nothing may have been invented yet, We Media founders Dale Peskin and Andrew Nachison like to say.

But that doesn’t mean that a lot of people aren’t trying.

On Wednesday, the first full day of the 2010 We Media Conference at the University of Miami, “Game Changers” like Byron Reece, chief innovation officer of Demand Media, were celebrated and challenged to help define the approach of the Digital Renaissance.

“The Internet is becoming increasingly self corrective with the ability to determine between right and wrong, what’s good and bad,” said Reece. “Nobody saw the Internet coming. When new technologies come out, the only frame of reference people have are the technologies they are replacing.

“People are willing to help people on the Internet and get nothing in return.”

The anonymous — and not so anonymous — community of the Internet was a feature of the first of the two-day conference, which included a discussion on the changing face of news with Tom Curley, CEO of the Associated Press, and Alberto Ibarguen, CEO of the Knight Foundation, moderated by John Hockenberry, host of “The Takeaway.”

A pair of morning sessions, however, provided a sharp contrast between Newser founder Michael Wolff and Tom Stites, founder of the Banyan Project, which emphasizes relational journalism to strengthen democracy.

“Journalism needs to serve a huge, ill-served public and encourage deeper civic engagement,” said Stites. “This journalism would be more relevant to the public it serves to make sounder life decisions.

“We need to stretch boundaries and enlarge the discourse. The future of journalism discourse is what is important. What are the problems that democracy demands we pursue?”

Wolff’s approach is not as grand, however.

“Journalism is not a public service, not a public good. Journalism is not social work,” said Wolff, emphasizing the community theme. “When it’s healthiest, it’s about having a relationship with your readers. You’re trying to find what people want. That sends you in directions that are both profane and ridiculous. Leer más “Relevence, relationships and the ridiculous dominate opening day of We Media ‘10”