La clase sobre cómo iniciar una empresa: “Lean Launchpad” ahora online


 

“Lean Launchpad” es un clase sobre lean startupque Steve Blank, da en universidades norteamericanas como Stanford, Berkeley, Columbia, Caltech y la National Science Foundation. Y el 14 de septiembre comenzará a darse de forma online, gratis, en Udacity. Una plataforma de aprendizaje online.

El curso incluye videos, concursos, conferencias y tareas. Múltiples módulos de video de corta duración representan cada clase de 20-30 minutos. Cada módulo es de aproximadamente tres minutos o menos, lo que te da la oportunidad de aprender pieza por pieza y volver a mirar porciones breves de las lecciones con facilidad. Los cuestionarios están incrustados en las conferencias y están ahí para permitirte comprobar qué tan correctamente estrás digiriendo la información del curso. Una vez que tomas un cuestionario, los que pueden ser una prueba de elección múltiple o rellenar los espacios en blanco, recibirás una respuesta inmediata.

¿Por qué tomar esta clase? Leer más “La clase sobre cómo iniciar una empresa: “Lean Launchpad” ahora online”

Why We Can’t See What’s Right in Front of Us


Tony McCaffrey

TONY MCCAFFREY

http://blogs.hbr.org/

Tony McCaffrey developed the Obscure Features Hypothesis for innovation as his dissertation in cognitive psychology from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is currently funded by the National Science Foundation’s Center for e-Design to implement his innovation-enhancing techniques in software. Beta testing will begin in summer 2012.

The most famous cognitive obstacle to innovation is functional fixedness — an idea first articulated in the 1930s by Karl Duncker — in which people tend to fixate on the common use of an object. For example, the people on the Titanic overlooked the possibility that the iceberg could have been their lifeboat. Newspapers from the time estimated the size of the iceberg to be between 50-100 feet high and 200-400 feet long. Titanic was navigable for awhile and could have pulled aside the iceberg. Many people could have climbed aboard it to find flat places to stay out of the water for the four hours before help arrived. Fixated on the fact that icebergs sink ships, people overlooked the size and shape of the iceberg (plus the fact that it would not sink).

More mundane examples: in a pinch, people have trouble seeing that a plastic lawn chair could be used as a paddle (turn it over, grab two legs, and start rowing) or that a candle wick could be used to tie things together (scrape the wax away to free the string).

The problem is we tend to just see an object’s use, not the object itself. When we see a common object, the motor cortex of our brain activates in anticipation of using the object in the common way. Part of the meaning of an object is getting ready to use it. If a type of feature is not important for its common use, then we are not cognizant of it. The result: our brain’s incredible inertia to move toward the common. Efficient for everyday life, this automatic neural response is the enemy of innovation. Leer más “Why We Can’t See What’s Right in Front of Us”

Tech Talk Podcast: Car Viruses

By THE NEW YORK TIMES

This week’s New York Times Tech Talk podcast takes a look at a new target for hackers: the car. Bettina Edelstein speaks to John Markoff, a Times reporter who has written about how vulnerable automotive computer systems are to malicious attacks. Computer security experts from the University of California, San Diego, and the University of Washington, backed by the National Science Foundation, were able to remotely take over car brakes and other critical controls. With modern vehicles increasingly dependent on computers, the researchers say, it’s important to address these issues before they become a problem.


Image representing New York Times as depicted ...
Image via CrunchBase

By THE NEW YORK TIMES

This week’s New York Times Tech Talk podcast takes a look at a new target for hackers: the car. Bettina Edelstein speaks to John Markoff, a Times reporter who has written about how vulnerable automotive computer systems are to malicious attacks. Computer security experts from the University of California, San Diego, and the University of Washington, backed by the National Science Foundation, were able to remotely take over car brakes and other critical controls. With modern vehicles increasingly dependent on computers, the researchers say, it’s important to address these issues before they become a problem. Leer más “Tech Talk Podcast: Car Viruses”