A Great Leader’s Year-end Checklist | Inc. |


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The year is almost over. Great leaders know how to tie up loose ends and make sure their employees are happy and ready to move forward.Salespeople live and die by the annual review. Auditors have built an entire industry around it. For the next month, print and television media will pour out gallons of coverage of the past year in review.

And yet, as leaders, we often move from one year to the next with little or no time spent reviewing the year just past from a purely leadership perspective. To help counter that, here’s my five-point year-end leadership checklist: Leer más “A Great Leader’s Year-end Checklist | Inc. |”

How To Tell Stories That Transform Prospects Into Customers


THE DAILY EGG

Hard boiled conversion optimization and design advice

Using stories in persuasion has been recommended by renowned marketers like Seth Godin and Guy Kawasaki.

Tell a compelling narrative, and people are more likely to buy.

But is this really true? If so, why do stories work so well?

According to research by Melanie Green and Timothy Brock at Ohio State University, story is persuasive because of its ability to transport.

Stories persuade by transporting us

A good story plucks the audience from the reality of their daily lives and transports them to a world with a simpler, clearer narrative.

Psychologists Green and Brock define transportation as a process where “all mental systems and capacities become focused on events occurring in the narrative.”

When experiencing a compelling story the listener is mentally transported into the world of the narrative.  This is so powerful that they often don’t notice physical changes in their environment (like a person entering the room).

They also experience a suspension of disbelief, becoming unaware of any real-world facts or details that may contradict the story.

This is why we accept inaccurate or implausible details, such as talking animals, in films and books.

Stories persuade by transforming us

More important to the discussion of creating narratives that persuade in a business sense, is a narrative’s ability to transform.

Entering the story’s world changes the way the listener processes information.

Their beliefs become more consistent with the story, and they develop more positive attitudes towards the characters in the story.

Paraphrased from the Green/Brock study:

When we are transported into a story, we tend to show beliefs consistent with the conclusions of the story.  We also tend to have a positive attitude toward the hero in the story.  It is likely that individuals altered their real-world beliefs in response to experiences in a story world.

Think about the persuasive power of your own personal story or the story of your business.  Would it be good for your market to have a “positive attitude toward the hero in your story”?  Would it be beneficial if your market had beliefs consistent with the conclusions of your story?

3 ways to tell a story that transports and transforms Leer más “How To Tell Stories That Transform Prospects Into Customers”

The 4 Keys to Writing Persuasive Copy Without Hype, BS, or Other Icky Gimmicks

How to write conversationally

Don’t write—tell. The best way to get started is not to write at all—but to speak.

Ideally, record yourself talking about your topic with a friend you know and trust. That way, you’ll avoid most of the self-consciousness that comes when you get out a voice recorder and try to record yourself talking to the air.

Then play back your recording and just listen to what you say. Take notes. How do your sentences sound? How often do you break the rules of formal grammar? I bet it’s all the time. So forget formal grammar. How often do you say something that in retrospect sounds totally gitty? Pretty often too, probably. So figure out what you wish you’d said, and use that instead. Write like you talk, but with the benefit of lots of time to choose your words. It’ll be a lot easier to read—because people read with an internal monologue. When you write conversationally, they can hear your words flow.


 

http://blog.kissmetrics.com


 

You should already know that clarity trumps persuasion for making sales. In fact, to borrow a metaphor from direct-response expert Dean Rieck, your copy should be like a shop window—completely invisible, affording a perfect view of the thing you’re selling.

But as with most important things in life, that’s easier said than done.

Fortunately—as with most things in life—much of the mystery can be removed by adopting a system that takes care of the basics. So let me introduce you to my Four Keys for writing clear, shiny copy that affords prospects the perfect view of whatever it is you’re selling.

Key #1: Conversational style

I’m sure you’ve heard it said that people don’t buy from websites—they buy from people.

And I’m sure you’ve also heard that people seldom buy from people they don’t like and trust.

Which is why hyped highlighter copy doesn’t tend to work. There’s no real personal connection, because it doesn’t read like anything a person would say—certainly not a person you’d be inclined to like or trust.

The same goes for verbose, puffed-up “corporatese”. No one talks like that—and if they did we’d assume there was something ludicrously wrong with them.

The solution is to write like you would talk.

Simple, right? So simple you probably reckon there’s no need to read the rest of this section—but you’d be wrong.

Because actually, writing like you talk is hard, and you’ll likely fail at it to start with. That’s because you have to make a shift in your thinking before it will click for you.

You have to get out of “Writing Mode”… Leer más “The 4 Keys to Writing Persuasive Copy Without Hype, BS, or Other Icky Gimmicks”

Conflicts, storytelling and design thinking

Por jabaldaia

Observing conflicts to leverage new ideas on design thinking

It seems trivial to create something from a conflict, but if the aim is to create something new and that solves a problem no longer seems so banal.

The same conflict can be observed by different people with different results according to the environments or contexts.

We Observe conflicts in meeting rooms to set company strategy or in the operating room of a hospital by the divergence of views regarding the best procedure or in the next room, in the same hospital for a diagnosis to a child.

GE can help us to think a little about the use of observation of the conflict to find solutions to various problems. But GE is not alone, is also with the assistance of design thinking.

For GE, the design process begins not from the standpoint of engineering, but gaining a deep understanding of people who will interact with the equipment. They do not leave from ideas they begin from unmet needs.


Por jabaldaia

Observing conflicts to leverage new ideas on design thinking

It seems trivial to create something from a conflict, but if the aim is to create something new and that solves a problem no longer seems so banal.

The same conflict can be observed by different people with different results according to the environments or contexts.

We Observe conflicts in meeting rooms to set company strategy or in the operating room of a hospital by the divergence of views regarding the best procedure or in the next room, in the same hospital for a diagnosis to a child.

GE can help us to think a little about the use of observation of the conflict to find solutions to various problems. But GE is not alone, is also with the assistance of design thinking.

For GE, the design process begins not from the standpoint of engineering, but gaining a deep understanding of people who will interact with the equipment. They do not leave from ideas they begin from unmet needs. Leer más “Conflicts, storytelling and design thinking”