Captivating Mobile Landing Pages


ioninteractive.com
BY 
ERIK BORTZFIELD

Getting more visitors to your mobile landing pages is great. If they aren’t sticking around, though, that couldindicate something about your mobile page is causing them to abandon.

If you can’t keep their attention with a captivating experience, you can lose them easily.  But what does it take to keep a visitor’s attention and get them to convert?

Keeping Visitor’s Attention on Mobile Landing Pages

Facebook Mobile Hits 543 Million Users [Update]


http://www.socialbakers.com

With the Facebook Mobile application becoming faster, how fast is its user base growing?

In May, the Facebook Mobile application for mobile devices had 488 million users. And by the end of June, it reached 543 million monthly active users. That represents a 57% Facebook mobile penetration from the 955 million strong user base.

Faster Application = Faster Growth?

The application has been often criticized for being too slow and unresponsive, but about two weeks ago, Facebook issued a massive update to its iOS app and it is now much faster and easier to use. Not to mention that iPads finally support Timeline and it looks great on the retina screen. Facebook for Android has also gone through a smaller update resulting in faster photo uploads.

Mobile Platforms – The Biggest Changes

North America continues to be the strongest Facebook Mobile continent with over 161 million monthly active users and South Africa, Nigeria and Japan still rule the ranking of the countries with the highest Facebook Mobile penetration. But check out the numbers concerning the penetration of individual mobile platforms! During the last quarter, Facebook for Android has grown the most in absolute numbers (22.5 million new users) and iPad increased its mobile Facebook base by 45%! Now that Timeline is available for iPad, it will be interesting to see how the numbers grow.

Facebook Mobile Infographic

Check out, Share and Like the infographic below and compare it to the results we issued in May.

Intelligent email marketing that drives conversions: infographic | by David Moth


Econsultancy logohttp://econsultancy.com/

Email marketing is an important channel for maintaining a relationship with customers and driving conversions through targeted messages and offers.

We’ve recently blogged seven tips for managing email marketing campaigns, as well as looking at stats which show that consumers open just 20% of email messages.

Then there’s also the pressing issue of mobile email, as while stats show that 27% of emails are opened on mobile devices results from our Email Marketing Census 2012 reveal that a large number of companies do not have any strategy in place for optimising emails for mobile.

This infographic from Monetate looks at the conversion rate for email marketing compared to Twitter and search, as well revealing ways of increasing sales using email.

David Moth is a Reporter at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or Google+

The Future Isn’t About Mobile; It’s About Mobility


HBR Blog Network

While the globe grapples with uncertain economic realities, “mobile” appears to be gold.

Facebook is expected to announce their uniquely targeted mobile advertising model before the end of the month. Amazon is talking to Chinese manufacturer Fox Conn with ambitions of building their own mobile device to serve as a compliment to Amazon’s considerable digital ecosystem of products and services. China itself has surpassed the US as the world’s dominant smartphone market with over a billion subscribers and roughly 400 million mobile web users. Advisory firm IDC predicts that by 2014 there will have been over 76 billion mobile apps downloaded resulting in an app economy worth an estimated thirty five billion in the same year. Mobile business will become big business in the not so distant future.

However, there will be blood as the business world pursues the mobile gold rush. Leer más “The Future Isn’t About Mobile; It’s About Mobility”

Facebook compra Spool, camino a conquistar el mundo móvil


 

Por  | wwwhatsnew.com

Ya os hemos hablado en algunas ocasiones de Spool, una aplicación que nos permitía guardar en el móvil los enlaces de la web para visualizarlos más tarde, disponible como extensión para Chrome y aplicación Android y iPhone.(…) Leer más “Facebook compra Spool, camino a conquistar el mundo móvil”

Mobile payments | 3wƒactory.com.ar


See on Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

by 3Wfactory.com.ar.

Editor’s note: Bill Ready is CEO of Braintree, an online and mobile payments provider.

Every day there is a new headline about mobile payments focused on using a mobile phone to pay at retail locations. Paypal, Google and other industry giants are racing to provide new in-store mobile payment solutions. Large merchants, such as Wal-mart and Target have contemplated their own mobile payment solutions. The debate about whether NFC will be the preferred technology to enable mobile payments rages. However, despite all this press and efforts by industry giants, there is stunningly little traction to use a mobile device to pay at retail locations. This is largely because the solutions offered by industry giants thus far don’t solve a meaningful problem in the daily lives of consumers or merchants. Few things in life are easier for consumers than swiping a credit card at checkout and in-store payment systems are as easy and ubiquitous as dial-tone for merchants.

However, There is a massive mobile commerce opportunity that is a severe pain point for both consumers and merchants, but large industry players are failing to meaningfully address it. That opportunity is e-commerce on the mobile device or m-commerce. M-commerce is ramping up, proving that consumers not only like to shop via their mobile device, but also will purchase. However, the numbers also show that there’s significant room for improvement in the mobile device purchasing experience – mainly through optimizing the shopping and payment processes for consumers.

Online holiday shopping in 2011 showed substantial growth in mobile shopping activity, with both traffic and sales on mobile devices more than doubling their volume over the same period a year earlier, according to research from IBM. During the holiday shopping season, 14.6 percent of all online sessions on a retailer’s site were initiated from a mobile device (up from 5.6 percent the year before), and sales from mobile devices reached 11 percent versus 5.5 percent in December 2010. Clearly, more consumers are becoming comfortable shopping and buying from retailer web sites using their smartphones. Leer más “Mobile payments | 3wƒactory.com.ar”

Mobile: A Serious Contender to the Desktop Computer


http://inspiredm.com

Mobile is certainly the big craze at the moment in the web industry. With the introduction of mobile devices such as the iPhone, iPad, and various other smart phones and tablets, the demand for websites to be ‘mobile friendly’ has never been greater. The purpose of this article is to highlight the impact mobile devices have had on web design in recent years. The article looks at various aspects such as best practices, challenges and design trends as well as taking a look at what may lie ahead for the future of mobile web design.

Mobile Conception

Motorola launched the world’s first commercially available mobile telephone, the DynaTAC 8000X, in 1983. Despite initially being affordable only to a privileged few and, by today’s standards, little about the device actually lending itself to mobility – not least its unwieldy brick-like size and weight – the Motorola 8000X nevertheless represented a major world-changing advance in the way we communicate.

In the 30 years or so since the 8000X went on sale, much has changed. For a start, the definition of the term ‘mobile technology’ has expanded beyond the scope of the telephone to include an evermore-diverse and sophisticated array of devices ranging from tablet PCs to eBook readers to so-called smart phones. Alongside other impressive capabilities such as allowing users to take and share high-definition photographs, read books, ascertain ones location down to a few metre’s, play movies and music and, even access the internet, that of making and receiving calls today seems a somewhat insignificant, easily overlooked feature of what now essentially amount to small, albeit ferociously powerful, personal computers.

The personal computer that has dominated our lives up until now has been, without doubt, the desktop computer, the experience of accessing the Internet on a mobile device having traditionally been fraught with difficulties and, more often than not, one characterised by intense disappointment. Yet with the help of advances in mobile hardware as well as software, the increasing availability of wireless, 3G and even 4G high-speed Internet, not to mention increased awareness and cooperation on behalf of designers and developers themselves, things are beginning to change fast with mobile devices now emerging as serious contenders to the desktop computer.

In 2009, Goldman Sachs economist, Mary Meek, predicted that over the following five years more users would begin to connect to the Internet through a mobile device than on a desktop computer. As of 2012, there are already more smart phones being sold worldwide than desktops with Gartner’s, one of the world’s leading IT research companies, predicting that mobiles will, ahead of schedule, surpass personal computers as the most common means of accessing the web. Meek has argued that the world is currently in the midst of its fifth major technology cycle of the past half century, the Mobile Internet Era – the four prior to it being the mainframe era of the 1950s and 60s, the mini-computer era of the 1970s, the desktop computer era of the 1980s and the desktop internet era of the 1990s and 2000s. If this cycle is as big as its four predecessors – and the sheer numbers involved suggest it will be even bigger – then those able to rise to the challenge of providing what users want, when they want it, will be more than compensated for their efforts.

The problem is that, until recently, few businesses, designers and developers have been able to fully grasp the importance of what is happening, many of them choosing to ignore the medium entirely. Designing for mobile devices presents its own unique challenges separate from those encountered when designing for the desktop, not least of all that of having to contend with a smaller screen.

Nevertheless, in the words of mobile Internet design expert, Luke Wroblewski, “Mobile, if it happened at all, has been a port of the desktop version that was conceived of, designed and built before anyone even considered the mobile experience.” Additional problems arise when considering the sobering fact that the vast majority of users do not yet own devices as feature-rich and technically competent as the iPhone 4S, which, like the 8000X back in the eighties, today still remains predominantly the preserve of the relatively wealthy.

Yet from a business perspective, it is hugely important to try and establish a strategy aimed at satisfying the demands of all elements of this increasingly important, growing target market, not just a privileged few. As many key players in the industry have already said, those involved in coming up with such strategies will, ultimately, have to start to do this by reversing the current trend of focusing on the desktop and begin designing for the mobile first.

State of the News Media 2012

Evidence shows that the spread of mobile technology is adding to news consumption—that it’s actually boosting the reading of long-form journalism. Great news for you freelance writers out there who love storytelling.
People who use mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, are getting news on these devices, and appear to be getting it frequently. 34% of desktop or laptop computer users now also get news on their smartphones. 27% of smartphone news consumers also get news on their tablet.

But while online audiences grew, print circulation continued to decline. So did ad revenues. When circulation and advertising revenue are combined, the newspaper industry has shrunk 43% since 2000. Here are some of the major trends the study recognized.


Via Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

The Pew Research Center recently released their State of the News Media study for 2012, and, believe it or not, it’s not all bad news!
The annual study is an analysis of the health of journalism in America. This year’s study includes special reports on the impact of mobile technology and social media on news. Lets dig in and see what they say! Leer más “State of the News Media 2012”

Finger-Friendly Design: Ideal Mobile Touchscreen Target Sizes

Not just that, but small touch targets can lead to touch errors. When small touch targets are grouped near each other, users can accidentally hit neighboring targets and initiate unintended actions. This is because the user’s finger overlaps on to the neighboring buttons. And if pressure is not carefully applied in the right spot, it’ll trigger the wrong action. It’s easy for users to make these errors with their index finger. But it’s even easier for them to make these errors if they use their thumb, because their thumb is much larger than the target. Sometimes users will tilt their thumb sideways and use the thin side to hit a small touch target. But this is a lot of unnecessary work.


In darts, hitting the bulls-eye is harder to do than hitting any other part of the dartboard. This is because the bullseye is the smallest target. This same principle can also apply to touch targets on mobile devices.

Smaller touch targets are harder for users to hit than larger ones. When you’re designing mobile interfaces, it’s best to make your targets big so that they’re easy for users to tap. But exactly how big should you make them to give the best ease of use to the majority of your users? Many mobile developers have wondered this, and most have turned to the user interface guidelines provided by the platform developer for the answer.

Finger-Friendly Design: Ideal Mobile Touch Target Sizes
(Image credit: ogimogi)

[Note: A must-have for professional Web designers and developers: The Printed Smashing Books Bundle is full of practical insight for your daily work. Get the bundle right away!]

What the Mobile Platform Guidelines Say

Apple’s iPhone Human Interface Guidelines recommends a minimum target size of 44 pixels wide 44 pixels tall. Microsoft’s Windows Phone UI Design and Interaction Guidesuggests a touch target size of 34px with a minimum touch target size of 26px. Nokia’sdeveloper guidelines suggest that the target size should be no smaller than 1cm x 1cm square or 28 x 28 pixels.

While these guidelines give a general measurement for touch targets, they’re not consistent with each other, nor are they consistent with the actual size of the human finger. In fact, their suggested sizes are much smaller than the average finger, which can lead to touch target problems for users on mobile devices.

Small Touch Targets Lead to Big Problems… Leer más “Finger-Friendly Design: Ideal Mobile Touchscreen Target Sizes”

Digital Health

The digital revolution continues. Music, television, books, shopping, politics, and now… health care.

The health industry is poised to be next in the ever-growing list of industrial sectors to be transformed by digital technology.

Already there are electronic medical records, EKGs for smartphones, personal trainer apps, and calorie counters galore! But innovation in health care is booming as innovators launch applications and technologies that make health care more convenient, efficient, and affordable. Here are some of the key trends we see shaping up in the space.
1. Weight loss plans go digital.

Many of us are already familiar with the plethora of apps that promise to give us a healthier lifestyle. Motivational weight loss apps and calorie counters are in no short supply. Take, for example, Skimble’s Workout Trainer app that allows the user to follow along to professional workout routines using their mobile, iPad, or Apple TV.


by Audrey | http://anidea.com/news/digital-health/ The digital revolution 
continues.  Music, television, books, shopping, politics, 
and now… health care

The health industry is poised to be next in the ever-growing list of industrial sectors to be transformed by digital technology.

Already there are electronic medical records, EKGs for smartphones, personal trainer apps, and calorie counters galore! But innovation in health care is booming as innovators launch applications and technologies that make health care more convenient, efficient, and affordable. Here are some of the key trends we see shaping up in the space.

1. Weight loss plans go digital.

Many of us are already familiar with the plethora of apps that promise to give us a healthier lifestyle. Motivational weight loss apps and calorie counters are in no short supply. Take, for example, Skimble’s Workout Trainer app that allows the user to follow along to professional workout routines using their mobile, iPad, or Apple TV.

ski

Workout Trainer App

Fitbit, the new Nike+ Fuel Band, and Up by Jawbone are also capitalizing on this movement. All three devices monitor consumers’ energy and activity levels and upload the findings to their mobile device. The mobile apps help users keep track of the findings over time, inspiring people to live healthier lifestyles.

nike

Put Your Best Foot Forward With Mobile Barcode Best Practices

When one considers the current economic climate, there is little doubt we are becoming a global community defined by constant connectivity and ultra-convenience. Mobile devices are a major factor in this as they are now ubiquitous and one’s device fulfils a multitude of requirements, connecting them to a plethora of information and facilitating all types of interactions. Mobile marketing and more specifically, mobile barcodes play a pivotal role in this new world of enhanced communications and on-demand information.

As the IAB’s Mobile Buyer’s Guide points out, mobile barcodes are an important way of activating traditional media, furthermore they can help boost sales, increase customer engagement, build brand loyalty, and educate an audience. These small black and white squares, reminiscent of ink blots, represent a great opportunity for marketers to bring traditionally static marketing and advertising to life so brands can instantly engage with their target audience. For example, adding a mobile barcode to a print or outdoor advertisement, on pack or at shelf that links to a discount, sweepstakes or provides additional information on a product or service provides an opportunity for the brand to engage with their target consumers 24/7/365.


By Laura Marriott (@kanadawomaninus) | http://www.iab.net/iablog

When one considers the current economic climate, there is little doubt we are becoming a global community defined by constant connectivity and ultra-convenience. Mobile devices are a major factor in this as they are now ubiquitous and one’s device fulfils a multitude of requirements, connecting them to a plethora of information and facilitating all types of interactions. Mobile marketing custom barcodesand more specifically, mobile barcodes play a pivotal role in this new world of enhanced communications and on-demand information.

As the IAB’s Mobile Buyer’s Guide points out, mobile barcodes are an important way of activating traditional media, furthermore they can help boost sales, increase customer engagement, build brand loyalty, and educate an audience. These small black and white squares, reminiscent of ink blots, represent a great opportunity for marketers to bring traditionally static marketing and advertising to life so brands can instantly engage with their target audience. For example, adding a mobile barcode to a print or outdoor advertisement, on pack or at shelf that links to a discount, sweepstakes or provides additional information on a product or service provides an opportunity for the brand to engage with their target consumers 24/7/365.  Leer más “Put Your Best Foot Forward With Mobile Barcode Best Practices”

Android-Kinect mashup is pretty cool

Well don’t expect anything like this to be officially supported, but it is a pretty neat little hack.

A guy who goes by the online handle DDRBoxman decided it would be fun to blow up his Samsung Galaxy Nexus display onto the wall.

So he connected his phone to a projector, making it possible to see his screen in 50 inches of glory.

The only issue is once you do that, how do you navigate through the phone interface without still needing to have the device in your hand?


by Mark Raby
http://www.tgdaily.com/games-and-entertainment-brief/61010-android-kinect-mashup-is-pretty-cool

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Well don’t expect anything like this to be officially supported, but it is a pretty neat little hack.

A guy who goes by the online handle DDRBoxman decided it would be fun to blow up his Samsung Galaxy Nexus display onto the wall.

So he connected his phone to a projector, making it possible to see his screen in 50 inches of glory.

The only issue is once you do that, how do you navigate through the phone interface without still needing to have the device in your hand?

Well, DDRBoxman had the whole system connected to a PC and, thanks to Microsoft’s open-source Kinect platform for Windows, he was able to create a custom ROM that mapped out the phone interface to the Kinect sensors.

It’s a pretty cool idea, and one that makes us think, pretty much for the first time, about how Android would fare in a much grander environment. It works fine on mobile devices, but what if Android could power a video game console in the future? Or could it be used as part of a “smart home” software package?

Surely none of these things is really in the works but it is fun to think about. For the time being, just check out the Android-Kinect project below:

Stat of the Day: Mobile Phones Overtake PCs

The Google data also finds that more consumers in each of these markets now have an internet-capable mobile device than have a desktop or laptop computer. In the U.S. the difference is nearly 10% more (76% to 68%), although consumers still report accessing the internet on multiple types of devices.

Tablets were seen as gaining share, hovering around 10% in each market outside the U.S. and slightly higher (17%) here. This week Pew Research Center issued some new numbers from its ongoing internet and American Life survey that show holiday sales of tablets and e-readers have doubled market share in a matter of weeks. The new Kindles and strong iPad sales helped drive that.


AdAgeStat

More Consumers in Key Global Markets Have Internet-Capable Mobile Devices Than Computers

By: New data from Google released exclusively to Ad Age shows the share of smartphone users on a fast rise, at the expense of feature-phone penetration. Feature phones allow internet access, but don’t have the full array of apps available to smartphones.
Alt Google Smartphone Penetration

The Google study looked at device ownership in five key global markets. Phase two of the survey was conducted in September and October 2011 and benchmarked against an earlier round conducted in January and February of last year. In each country, it’s easy to see the share of feature phones decreasing and the share of smartphones increasing. Leer más “Stat of the Day: Mobile Phones Overtake PCs”

360i Report on Hispanic Digital Influencers

Hispanics are spending, on average, 16 hours a week browsing the Internet, comparable to the 18 hours spent by the total US online population (Forrester). In the past year alone, the number of Hispanics using social media grew 38 percent versus 16 percent for the general population (comScore). Additionally, higher mobile device penetration enables Hispanics to stay connected on the go, both through traditional text and phone calls, as well as through mobile social media. While utility and information-seeking play a big role in motivating their digital behaviors, social networking and content creation form the centerpiece of Hispanics’ online lives.

Our first report in the series is about Hispanic Digital Influencers – their motivations, passions and behaviors. .Through our research, we identify trends that will help brands craft an outreach strategy to better engage and build relationships with US Hispanics online.


http://blog.360i.com

Why a POV series?

According to the 2010 US Census, the Hispanic population rose by 15.2 million between 2000 and 2010, , accounting for more than half of the nation’s population increase. Furthermore, in sheer dollar power, Hispanics’ economic influence rose from $212 billion in 1990 to $489 billion in 2000, to $978 billion in 2009, and is estimated to rise to roughly $1.3 trillion in 2014 (Selig Center for Economic Growth, Dec. 2010).

Photobucket

PhotobucketBeyond the amplification of their economic clout, Hispanics are also taking on a more critical role within the digital landscape. Hispanics have long prided themselves on living extremely social lives filled with family and friends; the fluidity of digital media serves as an effortless extension of centuries-old cultural habits.

Currently, there are roughly 32.2 million US Hispanics online, which represents 14 percent of the total online population. This number is expected to increase to 42 million by 2015 (Interactive Advertising Bureau). Leer más “360i Report on Hispanic Digital Influencers”

Design Best Practices for the Mobile Web

Any web designer may be noticing the close in the gap between web designer and mobile designer. Before, many designers chose to be within that niche, but as the mobile web grows, we web designers don’t really have a choice to do mobile design or not! It is often a requirement for most projects, and in years to come that fact will be even more so.

In this article we’ll look over the basic best practices for designing for the mobile web, and the major differences in designing for the “traditional web” (via desktops/laptops and all other bigger screens).
Limited and Big Navigation

Navigation is the number one thing all web designers and developers need to focus on. Without good, usable navigation, our users may get confused, not be able to find what they need or want, and will end up leaving our sites, never to return!

We know this though, that fact has been paraded throughout all of the previous generations of the web. Just as it’s important to plan and design effective navigation for a regular website, so is it important to do the same for a mobile interface.



http://www.onextrapixel.com/2012/01/02/design-best-practices-for-the-mobile-web/

Mobile web interfaces take a different sort of design practice, whether they are for mobile websites or native mobile applications. With a different sort of device, and a more noticeably different screen size, we as designers must consider a new set of best practices for design.

Design Best Practices for the Mobile Web

Any web designer may be noticing the close in the gap between web designer and mobile designer. Before, many designers chose to be within that niche, but as the mobile web grows, we web designers don’t really have a choice to do mobile design or not! It is often a requirement for most projects, and in years to come that fact will be even more so.

In this article we’ll look over the basic best practices for designing for the mobile web, and the major differences in designing for the “traditional web” (via desktops/laptops and all other bigger screens).

Limited and Big Navigation

Navigation is the number one thing all web designers and developers need to focus on. Without good, usable navigation, our users may get confused, not be able to find what they need or want, and will end up leaving our sites, never to return!

We know this though, that fact has been paraded throughout all of the previous generations of the web. Just as it’s important to plan and design effective navigation for a regular website, so is it important to do the same for a mobile interface. Leer más “Design Best Practices for the Mobile Web”