Microsoft previews new Metro website


 | http://www.neowin.net

Microsoft has released a preview of a new Metro version of its website. The new website features a streamlined look, including Metro-style tiles, large text and an easier navigation options.ms11111

The tiles and large text will likely appeal to users with touchscreen devices, as links will now be easier to select without zooming in. Microsoft had previously redesigned its website to its current look featuring Metro-style tiles last January, although the current site lacks large text for more touch-friendly navigation. Users can provide Microsoft with feedback on the new design by visiting the preview and clicking the scrolling “Feedback” button on the right side of the page.

Microsoft is also expected to launch a Metro-style redesign of its Hotmail service later this year. As with the new Microsoft.com homepage, the new Hotmail will appeal to both desktop- and touch-based users with its new design. Additionally…, Leer más “Microsoft previews new Metro website”

Internet Explorer 10: touch-friendly, and securely sandboxed

Microsoft is continuing to show off new features coming in its Internet Explorer 10 Web browser, with a couple of posts describing its touch-friendly Metro interface and its enhanced security.

The current trend in browser design, led by Google Chrome, is to scale back the browser’s interface so that it takes less and less of the screen, devoting more room to the Web content itself. Windows 8’s Metro design similarly removes window chrome to put the focus on content.

Metro Internet Explorer 10 is the logical conclusion of this trend: most of the time it has no visible interface at all, leaving only the Web page visible. Its app bar, displayed by swiping from the top or bottom of the screen or right clicking the mouse, contains tabs, the address bar, and so on.


By  | http://arstechnica.com
Internet Explorer 10: touch-friendly, and securely sandboxed

The tab selector, replete with pretty thumbnails.

Microsoft is continuing to show off new features coming in its Internet Explorer 10 Web browser, with a couple of posts describing its touch-friendly Metro interface and its enhanced security.

The current trend in browser design, led by Google Chrome, is to scale back the browser’s interface so that it takes less and less of the screen, devoting more room to the Web content itself. Windows 8’s Metro design similarly removes window chrome to put the focus on content.

Metro Internet Explorer 10 is the logical conclusion of this trend: most of the time it has no visible interface at all, leaving only the Web page visible. Its app bar, displayed by swiping from the top or bottom of the screen or right clicking the mouse, contains tabs, the address bar, and so on. Leer más “Internet Explorer 10: touch-friendly, and securely sandboxed”

Microsoft reinventa Windows para ofrecernos una experiencia multidispositivo

Y es que se mostró más que la nueva versión de Windows: Se mostró la reinvención de un sistema operativo, ahora pensando en las múltiples opciones de dispositivos que tenemos en el mercado.

La idea de reimaginar Windows, como dijo Sinofsky en su intervención, se debe al cambio en la realidad y en las comunicaciones: Hoy en día un usuario de computadores, tablets o móviles tiene que escoger y comprometerse con tal o cual hardware y sistema operativo, así como a tal interacción (táctil o mouse/teclado).

Esto es justo lo que Microsoft no quiere: El compromiso. Con Windows 8 se pretende que la persona que escoja este sistema operativo lo pueda extender a cualquier dispositivo ya sea móvil, tablet, ultrabook o PC. La clave para lograr el no compromiso está en el sistema operativo, aplicaciones y el hardware.

Sinofsky dijo que la experiencia de Windows 8 es moderna, rápida y fluida. Es fácil para todo tipo de usuario y es posible personalizarla profundamente.

Entonces describió las características que ya se habían publicando a modo de rumor desde hace unas semanas, como el hecho de que todo está conectado a la nube y puedes acceder a tus archivos, apps, etc. desde el dispositivo que sea, o que Windows 8 tiene la función de comunica apps entre ellas, logrando una experiencia más sencilla y completa.


 

http://www.fayerwayer.com
windows8

La presentación de Windows 8 Consumer Preview que se realizó hoy en el marco del Mobile World Congress de Barcelona presentó los cambios que se han hecho en Windows 8 desde su última aparición en el CES 2012.

Seguro que como buen fan tech seguiste el minuto a minuto que Cony nos ofreció en FW Live, y ahora quieres el resumen de lo que nos presentaron en la cita de hoy, que contó con Stephen Sinofsky como anfitrión del evento, en conjunto con Julie Larson-Green, Antoine Leblond y Michael Angiulo.

Y es que se mostró más que la nueva versión de Windows: Se mostró la reinvención de un sistema operativo, ahora pensando en las múltiples opciones de dispositivos que tenemos en el mercado.

La idea de reimaginar Windows, como dijo Sinofsky en su intervención, se debe al cambio en la realidad y en las comunicaciones: Hoy en día un usuario de computadores, tablets o móviles tiene que escoger y comprometerse con tal o cual hardware y sistema operativo, así como a tal interacción (táctil o mouse/teclado).

Esto es justo lo que Microsoft no quiere: El compromiso. Con Windows 8 se pretende que la persona que escoja este sistema operativo lo pueda extender a cualquier dispositivo ya sea móvil, tablet, ultrabook o PC. La clave para lograr el no compromiso está en el sistema operativo, aplicaciones y el hardware.

Sinofsky dijo que la experiencia de Windows 8 es moderna, rápida y fluida. Es fácil para todo tipo de usuario y es posible personalizarla profundamente.

Entonces describió las características que ya se habían publicando a modo de rumor desde hace unas semanas, como el hecho de que todo está conectado a la nube y puedes acceder a tus archivos, apps, etc. desde el dispositivo que sea, o que Windows 8 tiene la función de comunica apps entre ellas, logrando una experiencia más sencilla y completa.

Leer más “Microsoft reinventa Windows para ofrecernos una experiencia multidispositivo”

13 Windows 8 features worth knowing about

The Ribbon interface

A few years back, Microsoft shocked the world by completely overhauling the interface of its popular Office 2007 applications, replacing the familiar menu and toolbar system with something it called the Ribbon, which groups features and tools into separate collections. This controversial change angered many longtime Office users, while others found the new interface more efficient to use once they’d gotten used to it.

Now the Ribbon is making its way into Windows 8. You’ll see it in Windows Explorer, where it provides an easy way to check file attributes and sort files. The Ribbon interface pops up in unexpected places, too, such as the new Hyper-V management app. (For users who don’t like it, the UI can be disabled with one click.)
Windows 8 Explorer with Ribbon
The Ribbon interface is prevalent in Windows Explorer.

“At this point, Microsoft can call the Ribbon UI a success,” says Silver. “Most average users will probably find that the Ribbon helps them with tasks they’ve been unsure about previously. For power users, most of the skills they have for manipulating files and such will still work.”

But King isn’t so sure. “Some businesses believe worker productivity suffered from having to learn new commands and processes in Windows 7 and Office 2010,” he says. “This feature could actually inhibit businesses migrating to [Windows] 8.”

Verdict: Overall, the Ribbon is a plus for home and business users alike — especially since it can be turned off easily.
Wi-Fi Direct support

Here’s a feature that might not make headlines, but still holds promise: Like Android 4.0, Windows 8 natively supports Wi-Fi Direct. This emerging peer-to-peer technology uses a standard 802.11n Wi-Fi signal for network transmissions over short distances, but there’s no need for a router — it lets your Wi-Fi devices communicate directly with each other.

Wi-Fi Direct could usher in an age of interconnected devices in which your tablet sends data to your alarm clock, or maybe a smartphone communicates with a smart appliance in your kitchen.

Brian Fino, managing director at Fino Consulting, says Wi-Fi Direct is an important step in building connected intelligent applications. The more devices there are that support the technology, he says, the more robust software can be built to create a user experience that takes advantage of the direct connection.

Verdict: Wi-Fi Direct offers handy close-range peer-to-peer sharing, but it’s too soon to tell whether the technology will catch on.


http://www.computerworld.com
-.-


Windows 8 will introduce a slew of interesting features, but will they benefit you?

By John Brandon

Computerworld – Upgrades, system migration, support headaches — IT folks are probably dreading the next major Windows rollout. Yet Windows 8, which is scheduled to move to the beta stage in late February and will likely launch in the fall, does offer several compelling new features for both IT and end users.

Windows 8 Metro interface

The Metro interface (See slideshow).

By far the most talked-about aspect of Windows 8 is the Metro interface. Designed for touchscreen computers and tablets, and built to use HTML5 and CSS3, Metro ties into Internet apps like SkyDrive and Flickr. As with Windows Phone 7, you can swipe to navigate through tiles showing live Web info like stocks and news as well as more traditional apps.

But Pund-IT analyst Charles King questions whether businesses will really see benefits from Metro, saying it is mainly just a new paint job over the existing Windows interface. “Metro is yet one more interface for employees to learn and get used to,” he says. “In the current economic environment, businesses will consider that more of a nuisance than a benefit.”

Some features in Windows 8 are of clearer business value, say King and other industry analysts. After spending a few months getting to know the developer preview release, I’ve scouted out 13 less-discussed features and talked to experts to get their take on whom, if anyone, these features will benefit.

Fast boot-up

No finger-drumming here. In my tests, the preview build of Windows 8 booted in six seconds, an all-time record on my decked-out Digital Storm ODE desktop system. The previous boot time on the same machine running Windows 7 was approximately 90 seconds. It’s possible that the fast boot is due to the developer preview’s slimmer build, which lacks all of the bells and whistles of a full OS, but Microsoft has promised significantly faster boot times in Windows 8, which could make staring at logos on startup screens a thing of the past.

Booting up and resuming from sleep is already fast in Windows 7, says Gartner analyst Michael Silver, but making the boot time even faster is still a benefit. This will be particularly advantageous, Pund-IT’s King adds, for technical folks who reboot their computers often — for example, after installing apps — or for mobile workers who need to routinely power down a device to save battery life and then boot up quickly.

Verdict: If early speeds carry over to the shipping version, it’s a win for everybody… Leer más “13 Windows 8 features worth knowing about”