How To Do SEO. A Simple Starter Guide. Vía plainsimpleseo.com


A simple language, easy to follow,
basic starter guide to Search Engine Optimisation (SEO).

http://plainsimpleseo.com/

 

SEO GuidePt 0.Intro.

Introducing The SEO Guide.

This free SEO guide is designed to give you best practice advice on how to optimise your site for search engines.

Rumour and speculation dominate so many aspects of SEO. These myths and mystery have managed to taint the reputation of the search marketing industry, giving the impression that it’s worthless. This is a great shame.

I used to think SEO was worthless; something bolted on to a site when it went live, but I’ve since learned that there’s far more to it.

Those who know me will pay testament to my cynicism, but I can’t stress enough how misunderstood SEO is.

Used well, SEO can seriously improve your site’s performance in search rankings, and subsequently boost your site traffic (and sales) to great effect.

I am going to cover the basics of SEO. It should be all of what you need to know, and is all based on fact and research (gathered since starting work atQueryClick). Unlike many other SEO guides, none of this advice is based on speculation or hearsay.

Contents.

Part 1 is split in to 4 sections:

  1. 10%of the SEO mix.Technical SEOSite access, page speed, visibility and content duplication.
  2. 35%of the SEO mix.On Page SEOKeyphrase balance, code tags, page elements and retention.
  3. 55%of the SEO mix.Link BuildingInbound links, link relevance and social media.
  4. Other ElementsA few other things to bear in mind while optimising for search.

Before We Get Too Deep… Leer más “How To Do SEO. A Simple Starter Guide. Vía plainsimpleseo.com”

How to Diagnose and Improve Website Crawling

Sitemap Statistics

If things are radically out of whack, you can download a table of pages in the index from webmaster central and diagnose on a page by page level to see what is or or isn’t in the index.

Next, you want to try and do a full crawl of the website using something like Xenu. While it’s usually used to check for broken links, in the process it does crawl the website. If you have a large website, you are going to want to limit the crawling.

Another product that I like to use is Website Auditor. One of the interesting things about using Website Auditor is that you can specify crawling depth, which is how deep you want a crawl to go. Start at the homepage and go only one level. Run it again, this time with 2 levels, then 3. Additionally use your Webmaster Central report on most linked pages (think of them as link hubs). If your important pages aren’t within 2-3 pages of linking hubs on your website, you will have problems. IMHO it’s more important than ever to cultivate deep linking and to use that deep linking to spread your link equity, inbound trust, and authority wisely around your website.

In recent years Google has done away with the term/classification “supplemental index.” IMHO this was more of a public relations move, as they just grew tired of hearing from people who were upset that any part of their site was in the supplemental index–but I digress. There are certain parts of your website that aren’t as important as others or, as in the case of say a privacy policy, are important to people but not for rankings. To help you understand what pages Google thinks are important, you need to look at last crawl date in the Google Cache.

Pages that have the most links are going to get crawled more frequently. Pages that have the most trust and authority are going to get crawled most often. Pages that are linked to from those linking hubs, or trusted and authoritative hubs, will get crawled next most frequently. At each step away from the linking hubs, or authority points, crawl frequency will decrease–think of it like a classic pagerank model.


Michael Gray - Graywolf's SEO Blog

Michael Gray

By Michael Gray | http://www.wolf-howl.com/seo/diagnose-improve-crawling/

When you are reviewing a website, whether for your own projects or for a client project, one of the important areas to review is crawlability. In this post I’d like to talk about some of the ways you can look for and diagnose crawling issues.

If your important pages aren’t within 2-3 pages of linking hubs on your website, you will have problems …

The first step to diagnosing a crawling problem is to use a simple [site:example.com] search and compare how many pages you really have with how many Google thinks you have. Now, bear in mind that this number is an estimate. What you are trying to do is get a rough estimate of how many pages Google knows about, as Matt Cutts recently discussed in a Webmaster Central Video:

If you have several hundred or thousand pages but Google only shows 100, then you have a problem. Depending on how large the site is, anywhere from 10-30% accuracy would be a good rule of thumb.

The second thing you would want to look at would be Webmaster Central. If you submit a sitemap, Google tells you how many URLs you submitted and how many are in the index. The closer those numbers are, the better. Don’t worry if it’s not a 100% match because sometimes you include pages in your sitemap that get blocked at the page level with a robots meta tag. At this point, you are just concerned with gross numbers. Leer más “How to Diagnose and Improve Website Crawling”

Definición de más conceptos SEO

Ocurre que en ciertas ocasiones, hablando de SEO, salen mil términos que no siempre sabemos que son; leyendo el ebook que citaba anteriormente aparecen recogidos la mayoría y he considerado que puede ser muy interesante para todos (incluso para mi, a la hora de ordenar ideas). Los listo a continuación.

[Más…]

* “Alt” image tags – Las imágenes gráficas que forman cada página pueden tener “hidden text” o texto oculto asociado a las mismas, texto que no puede ser visto por el usuario, pero que será indexado por el mecanismo de búsqueda. Esto es requerido para estar en conformidad con criterios de accesibilidad (screen-readers usados por ciegos o personas con daños en la visión, leen los “alt” tags), aunque es usado frecuentemente por los mecanismos de búsqueda para determinar relevancia.

* Backlinks – Hyperlinks que vinculan a una página web específica (o sitio web). También conocidos como inbound-links. Google PageRank and Yahoo! WebRank son métodos usados para enumerarlos. Outbound links son los puntos de origen de los backlinks.

* Black-hat SEO – Un abordaje de SEO en los límites de lo que es considerado una práctica ética. Potencialmente contraviene los términos de servicio de los mecanismos de búsqueda. Por un lado riesgo elevado, por otro, recompensa muy alta. Quien lo practica puede ganar más visitantes si las técnicas blackhat son más efectivas que aquellas de las empresas que siguen un abordaje ético, llamado, white-hat SEO.

* Domain popularity – o popularidad del dominio. La cantidad de diferentes dominios que se vinculan con su sitio. Es un término no tan ampliamente usado como link popularity o popularidad del link, pero que indica el número de dominios únicos (muchos links de mismo dominio deben ser contados juntos).


Ocurre que en ciertas ocasiones, hablando de SEO, salen mil términos que no siempre sabemos que son; leyendo el ebook que citaba anteriormente aparecen recogidos la mayoría y he considerado que puede ser muy interesante para todos (incluso para mi, a la hora de ordenar ideas). Los listo a continuación.

Leer más “Definición de más conceptos SEO”

Six Revisions: A Comprehensive Guide Inside Your


by Alexander Dawson

Become a Facebook Fan of Six Revisions.

A Comprehensive Guide Inside Your <head>

As web designers and developers, we pay so much attention to what’s directly on the screen (or in our code) that the <head> of a document and what’s inside is often considered as an afterthought.

While in many cases it’s true that what appears on the screen is the most important part of a website (the content is what people visit a site for), the “thinking code” inside the <head> of our documents plays an important role.

This article will examine exactly what can fit inside a website’s head.

Mastering the Mind

The head of an HTML document is a busy area, and while it may not have the range of elements that the <body> can flex, it can actually engineer a range of its own elements to play vital roles in how a site will operate or how it can interoperate with other sites.

Depending on the website, there might be plenty going on inside its head.

So what are your options and how can they benefit your website? Well there’s quite a lot actually!

There are ways to add useful metadata into your documents (for search engines and other web robots to find), icons that you can supply web browsers for extra visuals (like favicons or device-specific icons for the iPad/iPhone), ways to allow the syndication of your content, and even stylistic and behavioral references that include external stylesheets and scripts.

In essence, the <head> of our HTML documents give the markup below it extra meaning. Leer más “Six Revisions: A Comprehensive Guide Inside Your”

.XXX domain deal stripped bare

ICM says .xxx gives members of the adult industry the opportunity to self-identify, enabling easier filtering, and to promote responsibility by voluntarily abiding by a set of industry best practices.

Registrants will have to have their identities verified, and $10 from each domain will go to a new organisation focussed on supporting free speech and child protection efforts.

It’s the sixth time over the last six years that the .xxx application has come in for public scrutiny. Most recently, this spring an ICANN comment period attracted an unprecedented 13,000 letters and emails, the vast majority of which came from outraged American religious groups.


ICANN Logo
Image via Wikipedia

Gun-totin’ pornsters step up
By Kevin Murphy
The company behind a proposal to create .xxx, an adults-only top-level internet domain, is set to run the gauntlet of objections from angry pornographers and appalled Christians for the sixth time.

ICANN last week published a draft contract that, if signed, could allow Florida-based ICM Registry to start offering .xxx domains as early as next summer, and opened up a 30-day public comment period.

Pornographers led by the Free Speech Coalition are already asking ICANN to kill the proposal. They claim ICM’s application is little more than a balls-out effort to bilk them out of money during a time of economic hardship and rampant piracy.

Domains with the .xxx extension are expected to cost more than $60 per year, compared to roughly $10 per year for .com domains. Leer más “.XXX domain deal stripped bare”

Homepage Optimization: How your peers use keywords and communicate with visitors

we wanted to hear your thoughts about homepage optimization. So we asked marketers. Here are a few of our favorite answers…

Keyword early, keyword often

1. Keywords are very important. Find the best for you site/business/product. Is your homepage going to be a landing page for your product or service? If so, you can use the appropriate keywords. Otherwise find the keywords that more generally describe your industry/product and use them for the home page.

2. Content: the keywords will be used to develop relevant content. Try to use the keywords early and often (but not unnaturally so) on the page. Especially effective if you can use them in a title, or bold, etc.

3. Title tags: use keywords in title tag, plus the name of your company at the end.

4. Write a good descriptive meta tag – remember this is going to be part of what shows up in natural results on a search results page

5. Limit graphics. For the graphics that are there, use Alt formatting to see that the search engine can read them.

6. Try to build incoming links into your home page

– Brent Carnduff, Owner at EchelonSEO


house_d6629dd56a(…) We wanted to hear your thoughts about homepage optimization. So we asked marketers. Here are a few of our favorite answers…

Keyword early, keyword often

1. Keywords are very important. Find the best for you site/business/product. Is your homepage going to be a landing page for your product or service? If so, you can use the appropriate keywords. Otherwise find the keywords that more generally describe your industry/product and use them for the home page.

2. Content: the keywords will be used to develop relevant content. Try to use the keywords early and often (but not unnaturally so) on the page. Especially effective if you can use them in a title, or bold, etc.

3. Title tags: use keywords in title tag, plus the name of your company at the end.

4. Write a good descriptive meta tag – remember this is going to be part of what shows up in natural results on a search results page

5. Limit graphics. For the graphics that are there, use Alt formatting to see that the search engine can read them.

6. Try to build incoming links into your home page

Brent Carnduff, Owner at EchelonSEO

Leer más “Homepage Optimization: How your peers use keywords and communicate with visitors”

10 statements that make my head explode, and what they really mean

Every now and then, someone says something that passes cringe-worthy and goes straight to neural overload. At those times, I get a temporary case of Exploding Head Syndrome (it’s real). I’ll skip the political stuff like “Global warming isn’t real” and “Get your government hands off my Medicare” and stick to internet marketing:

Quote 1: “We don’t need the internet. We get all our business from direct mail.”

Really? Wow, you’re lucky. You’ve established that not one internet user could become a customer. That eliminates a big expense of, maybe, $200k/year. Except, of course, that direct mail costs at least $100k per sending.

What you really said: “I like burning my company’s money. The internet is scary. Plus, I have zero motivation to improve anything.”

Quote 2: “SEO? That’s a fiction. The search engines figure it all out. We’ll stick with PPC”

I thought I was the only person to hear this quote, but Vanessa Fox wrote about it in her book, Marketing in the Age of Google . So I’m in good company.

I’m so proud of you! In the face of overwhelming evidence that 85% of people who use a search engine click on the unpaid results, you’ve stuck to your guns. You’re going to ignore that 85%. That’ll show ‘em!

What you really said: “I also refute global warming, and believe firmly that T Rex used its teeth to crack coconuts in the Garden of Eden.”


Every now and then, someone says something that passes cringe-worthy and goes straight to neural overload. At those times, I get a temporary case of Exploding Head Syndrome (it’s real). I’ll skip the political stuff like “Global warming isn’t real” and “Get your government hands off my Medicare” and stick to internet marketing:

Quote 1: “We don’t need the internet. We get all our business from direct mail.”

Really? Wow, you’re lucky. You’ve established that not one internet user could become a customer. That eliminates a big expense of, maybe, $200k/year. Except, of course, that direct mail costs at least $100k per sending.

What you really said: “I like burning my company’s money. The internet is scary. Plus, I have zero motivation to improve anything.”
Quote 2: “SEO? That’s a fiction. The search engines figure it all out. We’ll stick with PPC”

I thought I was the only person to hear this quote, but Vanessa Fox wrote about it in her book, Marketing in the Age of Google . So I’m in good company.

I’m so proud of you! In the face of overwhelming evidence that 85% of people who use a search engine click on the unpaid results, you’ve stuck to your guns. You’re going to ignore that 85%. That’ll show ‘em!

What you really said: “I also refute global warming, and believe firmly that T Rex used its teeth to crack coconuts in the Garden of Eden.” Leer más “10 statements that make my head explode, and what they really mean”