News and Views on Data-Driven Digital


By 

Bill Wise

AdExchanger: News and Views on Data-Driven Digital Advertising

It’s been nearly a year since ad sales workflow systems provider Mediaocean was given the regulatory green lightto form the merger of Mediabank and Donovan Data Systems. While Mediaocean picked up the mantle of both entities’ attempts to bring online media buying methods to traditional TV, Mediaocean CEO Bill Wise tellsAdExchanger that the company is preparing to fully rollout its rebuilt system, starting with a display ad sales tool dubbed Prisma and then circling back around to include all media buying.

AdExchanger: How has Mediaocean’s strategy evolved since the merger?

BILL WISE: When we first announced the merger back in September of 2011, we were very grand about discussing our strategy – we wanted to be “the app store for advertising,” taking on Google, and as the only alternative in terms of ad tech plumbing.

Then, what you saw was us being quiet for the last eight or nine months. That’s been on purpose, because we had a lot of integration work to do. We completely reorganized the business, completely realigned our resources, created three separate divisions within the company, and we internally rebranded all of our products.

In the next couple of weeks we’re going to actually launch the new brands externally. We had five different digital technologies between DDS and Mediabank. We’re completing the entire rewrite and integration of all of those five products into one new digital product, starting with display advertising, called Prisma.

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The Role of the Chief Strategy Officer


By Taman H. Powell and Duncan N. AngwinBy understanding how the duties of the chief strategy officer (CSO) can vary significantly from organization to organization, boards and CEOs can make better decisions about which type of CSO is necessary for their leadership teams.



THE CHIEF STRATEGY OFFICER
 (CSO) is a comparatively new but increasingly important role in many organizations. To explore the role of the CSO, we conducted 24 interviews with CSOs at U.K. companies that are part of the FTSE 100 Index, across a number of industrial sectors. Secondary data — company reports, strategy documents and presentations — were used to complement the interviews. All interviews were conducted either at the CSO’s office or via telephone and followed the same semistructured outline and set of questions.

They were transcribed verbatim and analyzed through qualitative data management software.From the outset, it was clear that there was a variation in CSO roles, focused on two dimensions.

The first dimension was the stage of the strategy process in which the CSO was involved. Our findings identified a significant demarcation between whether the CSO was focused on the formulation of the strategy or the execution of the strategy.

The second dimension of variation was how the CSO engaged in the strategy process. Some CSOs were facilitators, advising business units during the strategy formulation or assisting in the execution. Other CSOs were enactors, far more likely to execute the strategy process by themselves or with their team.Based on variation in the roles carried out by the CSOs, we have developed a typology of four CSO archetypes. Leer más “The Role of the Chief Strategy Officer”

Using Networks to Find Knowledge

As you can see, effectively using the knowledge of the business means trying to get better connections to reduce the size of the “I don’t know who to ask” space.

So how can we do this? One possibility is that we direct our questions to people in the organization that we know are very highly connected. However, one simulaiton study of search in a real organizational network has found that this might result in more steps needed to find the right person. In this simulation, a slightly more efficient search could be conducted by going to the manager who is responsible for the subject area that is being investigated or by starting the search in the right department.


Last week Ralph Ohr left me with a challenge to think about how to use experts to get the best outcomes on making decisions under conditions of uncertainty. We constantly miss disruptive changes in the operating environment and I suppose if I really knew the answer, I wouldn’t be posting it on a blog.

Sometimes predictions are genuinely impossible because of true uncertainty. The future is the future and nothing in the past can help us predict some events. Rather than making predicitons, operational flexibility is probably the best response to this type of uncertaintly.

On the other hand, sometimes the emerging disruptions are right under our noses and the problem is getting over myopia. Experts can suffer from myopia as well as the rest of us so perhaps the issue is finding the right expert with the right interpretation of what is happening. Leer más “Using Networks to Find Knowledge”

Dell, HP bidding war for 3Par heats up

HP’s latest offer of $2B is tenfold premium over 3Par’s market value
By Lucas Mearian

Computerworld – In less than two weeks, the bids for grid-storage vendor 3Par have nearly doubled, from $1.15 billion to $2 billion with Hewlett-Packard’s latest tit-for-tat bid against Dell.

The two technology behemoths are fighting for what is arguably the last independent vendor of enterprise-class data storage on the market. But when do the offers become too outrageous? Or can they? 3Par, an 11-year-old company that sells a high-end, highly scalable storage platform, had sales of about $200 million last year, so the latest bid represents a tenfold premium over the revenue 3Par generates.

“Regardless of what anyone claims, money is the only factor that will determine the outcome,” said Steve Duplessie, lead analyst at research firm Enterprise Strategy Group.


Image representing Dell as depicted in CrunchBase
Image via CrunchBase

HP’s latest offer of $2B is tenfold premium over 3Par’s market value

By Lucas Mearian

Computerworld – In less than two weeks, the bids for grid-storage vendor 3Par have nearly doubled, from $1.15 billion to $2 billion with Hewlett-Packard’s latest tit-for-tat bid against Dell.

The two technology behemoths are fighting for what is arguably the last independent vendor of enterprise-class data storage on the market. But when do the offers become too outrageous? Or can they? 3Par, an 11-year-old company that sells a high-end, highly scalable storage platform, had sales of about $200 million last year, so the latest bid represents a tenfold premium over the revenue 3Par generates.

“Regardless of what anyone claims, money is the only factor that will determine the outcome,” said Steve Duplessie, lead analyst at research firm Enterprise Strategy Group. Leer más “Dell, HP bidding war for 3Par heats up”

How to Bootstrap Your New Business Wisely

Starting a business is tough—and that goes double when you’re starting a business in an economic environment this challenging. If you’re bootstrapping (and chances are good that you’re using your own money to fund the company) it’s important to use your resources as efficiently as possible, You want to protect your capital but also invest where it counts most. I’ve been helping businesses for years, and here is what successful bootstrappers know:
Control fixed expenses

At some point—usually when you need to bring other people aboard to accommodate growth—you’ll probably need an office. Until then, work from home and use e-mail and cell phones to communicate, so you can minimize fixed expenses like office space and furniture.
Use contractors as much as possible

Avoid hiring people even when you need additional help. By using contractors you can save significant capital when compared to hiring employees (BusinessWeek.com, October/November, 2007). Your per-hour costs may be higher for projects, but you don’t have to deal with payroll taxes, benefits or workers’ comp, and you have a lot more spending flexibility because when there is no work, you don’t have to pay. Just beware of IRS rules differentiating employees vs. contractors – the government is cracking down on companies that treat contractors like employees.


stick figures working 150Starting a business is tough—and that goes double when you’re starting a business in an economic environment this challenging. If you’re bootstrapping (and chances are good that you’re using your own money to fund the company) it’s important to use your resources as efficiently as possible, You want to protect your capital but also invest where it counts most. I’ve been helping businesses for years, and here is what successful bootstrappers know:

Control fixed expenses

At some point—usually when you need to bring other people aboard to accommodate growth—you’ll probably need an office. Until then, work from home and use e-mail and cell phones to communicate, so you can minimize fixed expenses like office space and furniture.

Use contractors as much as possible

Avoid hiring people even when you need additional help. By using contractors you can save significant capital when compared to hiring employees (BusinessWeek.com, October/November, 2007). Your per-hour costs may be higher for projects, but you don’t have to deal with payroll taxes, benefits or workers’ comp, and you have a lot more spending flexibility because when there is no work, you don’t have to pay. Just beware of IRS rules differentiating employees vs. contractors – the government is cracking down on companies that treat contractors like employees. Leer más “How to Bootstrap Your New Business Wisely”