New York City’s 20 Most InDemand Employers – thnxz @bjshally


Brianne ShallyApril 18, 2013

Our company rankings just got more interesting. Last year, we gave you the world’s Most InDemand Employers, along with sub-lists for specific countries and functions. Now we’re taking our insights down to the city level and just today at Connect in New York, we announced the Big Apple’s rankings.

So where do New Yorkers most want to work? Based on LinkedIn’s massive data set – and the actual actions of over five million professionals residing in the New York area* – here’s a snapshot of the city’s professional landscape and its most desirable employers. Did your company make the list?

Top 20 InDemand Employers NYC

Industry insights:

  • Google’s #1 spot hints at the city’s booming tech industry, but it is still the sole internet company on the list.
  • In the fashion/retail space, larger shops Ralph Lauren and Coach make the list, as does the more petite outfit J. Crew.
  • Despite New York’s reputation as the advertising capital of the world, Ogilvy & Mather is the only ad agency in the top 20.

Other key takeaways:

  • Large companies dominate: over 75% of the companies employ more than 10,000 people, but smaller ones still manage to compete.
  • Headquarters matter: the majority of companies are headquartered in New York while only a quarter of them are based elsewhere.
  • There’s some overlap with the Global Top 20: Google, Apple, PepsiCo, McKinsey & Company, and Ogilvy are the five companies that make both lists, with Google taking the top spot in each.

Working for a sought-after company has a certain cachet. It feels good. It makes you more satisfied and productive. It makes you less likely to leave. And then when you do want to leave, it makes you a more desirable candidate.

For the companies themselves, it’s simple: a good reputation makes recruiting easier, cheaper, and faster, while a bad one does the opposite. That’s why we developed theLinkedIn Talent Brand Index, a powerful tool to help employers measure and improve their talent brand.

At LinkedIn, we love using our data to help members and companies gain a professional edge. Stay tuned for additional InDemand rankings, and much, much more! #inTalent

 *How did we rank the winners? We analyzed billions of data points between members and companies and compared them to thousands of survey responses to determine a company’s familiarity and engagement score. The 5 million+ New York City member actions were factored in, including connecting with employees, viewing employee profiles, visiting Company and Career Pages, and following companies. We then analyzed the same activity for just the five million members residing in the Greater New York area. We excluded LinkedIn from all rankings for the sake of objectivity.

Note: This post originally appeared on our LinkedIn Talent Solutions blog.

5 Ways to Get Email Overload Under Control


Mashable

Dmitri Leonov is vice president of growth at Sanebox. Follow him at @dmitri.

If you’re like most people with a connection to the internet and a job that requires you interact via email, then you probably know what email hell feels like. The only good news is that you’re not alone. In fact, the average person gets more than one hundred emails per day. The bad news is it’s not getting better.

The number of emails you receive will continue to grow every year. So what, if anything, can you do to get a grip on this email avalanche? Start with these five tips.

1. Set a Time Limit

According to a recent McKinsey Global Institute report, people spent 28% of their time writing, reading, and answering email. Most of it is unproductive because email is reactive by nature. The inherent gamification of clearing your inbox provides a brief feeling of accomplishment. But unless you’re doing customer support, your job description probably doesn’t include “respond to every email.”

Answering email is just one part of work. That’s why you should determine how much time you want to spend in your inbox on a given day, and don’t exceed it. One suggestion is to dedicate 15-minute blocks every two hours to staying on top of email without letting it take over your day.

2. Know Your Etiquette Leer más “5 Ways to Get Email Overload Under Control”

In case you missed them, see which articles have been most popular with our readers in the first quarter of this year.


McKinsey Quarterly
mckinseyquarterly.com

Read them today and join the conversation.

How leaders kill meaning at work art 1. GOVERNANCE
How leaders kill meaning at work
Senior executives routinely undermine creativity, productivity, and commitment by damaging the inner work lives of their employees in four avoidable ways.
The executive's guide to better listening art 2. GOVERNANCE
The executive’s guide to better listening
Strong listening skills can make a critical difference in the performance of senior executives, but few are able to cultivate them. Here’s how.
A CEO's guide to innovation in China 3. STRATEGY
A CEO’s guide to innovation in China
Dynamic domestic players and focused multinationals are helping China churn out a growing number of innovative products and services. Intensifying competition lies ahead; here’s a road map for navigating it.

Leer más “In case you missed them, see which articles have been most popular with our readers in the first quarter of this year.”

The Age of Big Data ****editorial NEWS ANALYSIS****

Mo Zhou was snapped up by I.B.M. last summer, as a freshly minted Yale M.B.A., to join the technology company’s fast-growing ranks of data consultants. They help businesses make sense of an explosion of data — Web traffic and social network comments, as well as software and sensors that monitor shipments, suppliers and customers — to guide decisions, trim costs and lift sales. “I’ve always had a love of numbers,” says Ms. Zhou, whose job as a data analyst suits her skills.

Enlarge This Image
Chad Hagen

To exploit the data flood, America will need many more like her. A report last year by the McKinsey Global Institute, the research arm of the consulting firm, projected that the United States needs 140,000 to 190,000 more workers with “deep analytical” expertise and 1.5 million more data-literate managers, whether retrained or hired.

The impact of data abundance extends well beyond business. Justin Grimmer, for example, is one of the new breed of political scientists. A 28-year-old assistant professor at Stanford, he combined math with political science in his undergraduate and graduate studies, seeing “an opportunity because the discipline is becoming increasingly data-intensive.” His research involves the computer-automated analysis of blog postings, Congressional speeches and press releases, and news articles, looking for insights into how political ideas spread.

The story is similar in fields as varied as science and sports, advertising and public health — a drift toward data-driven discovery and decision-making. “It’s a revolution,” says Gary King, director of Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science. “We’re really just getting under way. But the march of quantification, made possible by enormous new sources of data, will sweep through academia, business and government. There is no area that is going to be untouched.”

Welcome to the Age of Big Data. The new megarich of Silicon Valley, first at Google and now Facebook, are masters at harnessing the data of the Web — online searches, posts and messages — with Internet advertising. At the World Economic Forum last month in Davos, Switzerland, Big Data was a marquee topic. A report by the forum, “Big Data, Big Impact,” declared data a new class of economic asset, like currency or gold.


http://www.nytimes.com/ | By 
NEWS ANALYSIS

GOOD with numbers? Fascinated by data? The sound you hear is opportunity knocking.

Mo Zhou was snapped up by I.B.M. last summer, as a freshly minted Yale M.B.A., to join the technology company’s fast-growing ranks of data consultants. They help businesses make sense of an explosion of data — Web traffic and social network comments, as well as software and sensors that monitor shipments, suppliers and customers — to guide decisions, trim costs and lift sales. “I’ve always had a love of numbers,” says Ms. Zhou, whose job as a data analyst suits her skills.

To exploit the data flood, America will need many more like her. A report last year by the McKinsey Global Institute, the research arm of the consulting firm, projected that the United States needs 140,000 to 190,000 more workers with “deep analytical” expertise and 1.5 million more data-literate managers, whether retrained or hired.

The impact of data abundance extends well beyond business. Justin Grimmer, for example, is one of the new breed of political scientists. A 28-year-old assistant professor at Stanford, he combined math with political science in his undergraduate and graduate studies, seeing “an opportunity because the discipline is becoming increasingly data-intensive.” His research involves the computer-automated analysis of blog postings, Congressional speeches and press releases, and news articles, looking for insights into how political ideas spread.

The story is similar in fields as varied as science and sports, advertising and public health — a drift toward data-driven discovery and decision-making. “It’s a revolution,” says Gary King, director of Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science. “We’re really just getting under way. But the march of quantification, made possible by enormous new sources of data, will sweep through academia, business and government. There is no area that is going to be untouched.”

Welcome to the Age of Big Data. The new megarich of Silicon Valley, first at Google and now Facebook, are masters at harnessing the data of the Web — online searches, posts and messages — with Internet advertising. At the World Economic Forum last month in Davos, Switzerland, Big Data was a marquee topic. A report by the forum, “Big Data, Big Impact,” declared data a new class of economic asset, like currency or gold. Leer más “The Age of Big Data ****editorial NEWS ANALYSIS****”

In case you missed them, see which articles were most popular with our readers in the third quarter of this year.

1. BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
Clouds, big data, and smart assets: Ten tech-enabled business trends to watch
Advancing technologies and their swift adoption are upending traditional business models. Senior executives need to think strategically about how to prepare their organizations for the challenging new environment. In a set of accompanying podcasts, leading experts offer their views on how these trends will evolve and change business models.

2. GOVERNANCE
Why good bosses tune in to their people
Know how to project power, counsels Stanford management professor Bob Sutton, since those you lead need to believe you have it for it to be effective. And to lock in your team’s loyalty, boldly defend their backs.

3. STRATEGY
Global forces: An introduction
Five crucibles of change will restructure the world economy for the foreseeable future. Companies that understand them will stand the best chance of shaping it. In a related video commentary, McKinsey director Peter Bisson discusses the importance of spotting trends and building them into corporate strategy.



Clouds, big data, and smart assets: Ten tech-enabled business trends to watch graphic 1. BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
Clouds, big data, and smart assets: Ten tech-enabled business trends to watch
Advancing technologies and their swift adoption are upending traditional business models. Senior executives need to think strategically about how to prepare their organizations for the challenging new environment. In a set of accompanying podcasts, leading experts offer their views on how these trends will evolve and change business models.
Why good bosses tune in to their people graphic 2. GOVERNANCE
Why good bosses tune in to their people
Know how to project power, counsels Stanford management professor Bob Sutton, since those you lead need to believe you have it for it to be effective. And to lock in your team’s loyalty, boldly defend their backs.
Global forces: An introduction graphic 3. STRATEGY
Global forces: An introduction
Five crucibles of change will restructure the world economy for the foreseeable future. Companies that understand them will stand the best chance of shaping it. In a related video commentary, McKinsey director Peter Bisson discusses the importance of spotting trends and building them into corporate strategy.
Leer más “In case you missed them, see which articles were most popular with our readers in the third quarter of this year.”

The Rubbery Challenges of Innovation

Creativity in Leaders is Key

One is the latest bi-annual IBM CEO study which came out a few months ago. Based on interviews and surveys of over 1,500 CEOs from around the world, it focuses on the importance of creativity. In particular, creativity in leaders as they face ever more complex problems.

“The degree of difficulty CEOs anticipate, based on the swirl of complexity, has brought them to an inflection point,” says IBM. “Asked to prioritize the three most important leadership qualities in the new economic environment, creativity was the one they selected more than any other choice.”


By Adam Richardson – //designmind.frogdesign.com/blog

I have recently started blogging for Harvard Business Review which is an exciting forum to be part of, and certainly I’m humbled to be in such esteemed company as John Hagel, Roger Martin, Michael Schrage, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, and many others. The first installment looked at the benefits from not over-determining a product in an early-stage category, using the iPad as an example, and the second at the downsides of using skunk works to boost innovation.

The latest one just went up today and it looks at recent studies by IBM and McKinsey that illuminate two key challenges many organizations face when trying to manage innovation: creativity to come up with innovative ideas in the first place, and effectively implementing them so they reach the market in the manner originally envisioned.

“I remember a conversation with an engineer at a large company’s future technologies lab describing what they did as “rubber meets the sky”, as opposed to “rubber meets the road.” The former is about coming up with creative new ideas, the latter about bringing them to the market. Both are needed, of course, and two recent reports shed light on the challenges that companies often still face when trying do both well. Leer más “The Rubbery Challenges of Innovation”

Some Thoughts on the McKinsey Global Innovation Survey

McKinsey have just released their 2010 innovation survey. It’s a very thought-provoking read and its based on a survey of over 2000 respondents from several industries. The survey can be found on McKinseyQuarterly.com and its free to get a subscription. Many of the survey results regarding the management of innovation as a process are consistent with a lot of things that we have been writing on the blog. According to McKinsey, these same management issues come up year after year, too.


McKinsey have just released their 2010 innovation survey. It’s a very thought-provoking read and its based on a survey of over 2000 respondents from several industries. The survey can be found on McKinseyQuarterly.com and its free to get a subscription. Many of the survey results regarding the management of innovation as a process are consistent with a lot of things that we have been writing on the blog. According to McKinsey, these same management issues come up year after year, too. Leer más “Some Thoughts on the McKinsey Global Innovation Survey”