Should ‘Social Entrepreneurship’ Mean ‘Creating Jobs for Average Workers’?

It was logical that the two were invited: their new book, Race Against the Machine (Digital Frontier Press, 2011), is on exactly that theme. (Here’s our blog post about the book.)

McAfee’s opening statement, which he posted at his blog, includes this challenge for how we might rethink the meaning of “corporate responsibility”:

It’s also time to change our minds and broaden our definition of ‘social entrepreneurship.’ When we hear that term at present, we think of sustainability, or clean or green tech, or improving the lots and lives of people in the developing world. All of these are worthwhile and wonderful things to do. Here’s another one: create jobs for average workers. Because there aren’t enough of them right now. The greatest scarcity in our economies now is a scarcity not of resources or even of good new ideas, but of opportunity — of chances to let people realize the American Dream, and the English Dream, the Indian and Chinese and Mexican dream.


By Leslie Brokaw
From >>> http://sloanreview.mit.edu/improvisations/2011/11/28/should-social-entrepreneurship-mean-creating-jobs-for-average-workers/#.TuPdAVawXUw

An annual event called “Silicon Valley Comes to Oxford,” which took place earlier this month, featured a debate at the Oxford Union on this motion:

“This house believes that the average worker is being left behind by advances in technology.”

The concept of “Silicon Valley community” is a geographically loose one, because helping make the argument were MIT Sloan’s Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the MIT Center for Digital Business, and Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist at the center.

It was logical that the two were invited: their new book, Race Against the Machine (Digital Frontier Press, 2011), is on exactly that theme. (Here’s our blog post about the book.)

McAfee’s opening statement, which he posted at his blog, includes this challenge for how we might rethink the meaning of “corporate responsibility”:

It’s also time to change our minds and broaden our definition of ‘social entrepreneurship.’ When we hear that term at present, we think of sustainability, or clean or green tech, or improving the lots and lives of people in the developing world. All of these are worthwhile and wonderful things to do. Here’s another one: create jobs for average workers. Because there aren’t enough of them right now. The greatest scarcity in our economies now is a scarcity not of resources or even of good new ideas, but of opportunity — of chances to let people realize the American Dream, and the English Dream, the Indian and Chinese and Mexican dream. Leer más “Should ‘Social Entrepreneurship’ Mean ‘Creating Jobs for Average Workers’?”

Quick Takes: Why Is Customer Service So Bad?

Andrew McAfee’s plea about customer service
“How can it still be the case, in 2010, that really well-understood technologies (telephony, voice prompts, etc.) are still detracting from customer service, rather than improving it, at some of the largest companies in the world?”

That’s MIT Sloan research scientist Andrew McAfee, wondering in his blog why the American Express Travel Services phone service offers such poor service. None of the possibilities make sense. Leaders aren’t aware? All they have to do is dial their number. They’re aware, but not bothered? “How could they not be?” McAfee asks. “They run a customer service business — it’s all they do — and they just released a study showing that, as their headline put it, ‘Americans Will Spend 9% More With Companies That Provide Excellent Service.’”

McAfee’s third possibility is the most intriguing: Leaders know about the problems, are concerned about the problems, but aren’t planning on doing anything about the problems.

“Maybe they don’t feel like they have the budget, the expertise, or the managerial bandwidth to take on a tech-heavy project now,” McAfee says. “Maybe the issues I experienced only crop up in the particular segment of Amex Travel I was dealing with, or when call volumes are particularly heavy, and so the company is willing to live with them for the time being. But I’m a heavy traveler, the kind of customer they probably want to attract and retain, and I’m sufficiently struck by this lousy tech leading to lousy customer service that I’m sitting around blogging about it.”


Andrew McAfee’s plea about customer service
“How can it still be the case, in 2010, that really well-understood technologies (telephony, voice prompts, etc.) are still detracting from customer service, rather than improving it, at some of the largest companies in the world?”

That’s MIT Sloan research scientist Andrew McAfee, wondering in his blog why the American Express Travel Services phone service offers such poor service. None of the possibilities make sense. Leaders aren’t aware? All they have to do is dial their number. They’re aware, but not bothered? “How could they not be?” McAfee asks. “They run a customer service business — it’s all they do — and they just released a study showing that, as their headline put it, ‘Americans Will Spend 9% More With Companies That Provide Excellent Service.’”

McAfee’s third possibility is the most intriguing: Leaders know about the problems, are concerned about the problems, but aren’t planning on doing anything about the problems.

“Maybe they don’t feel like they have the budget, the expertise, or the managerial bandwidth to take on a tech-heavy project now,” McAfee says. “Maybe the issues I experienced only crop up in the particular segment of Amex Travel I was dealing with, or when call volumes are particularly heavy, and so the company is willing to live with them for the time being. But I’m a heavy traveler, the kind of customer they probably want to attract and retain, and I’m sufficiently struck by this lousy tech leading to lousy customer service that I’m sitting around blogging about it.” Leer más “Quick Takes: Why Is Customer Service So Bad?”

Intel Wants to Be Inside Everything

Chips that act as the brains of electronic devices other than computers or mobile phones are known as embedded processors and represent a $10 billion market, according to Intel Chief Executive Paul Otellini. That’s small compared with the $34.5 billion market for PC processors. Intel will have $43 billion in revenues this year, according to analysts in a Bloomberg survey. Of that, only about $1 billion comes from embedded products, says the company. Still, Atom sales are growing fast, and the company is counting on the chip to help break its dependence on the slowing PC market. “There’s a limit to where their core business will take them,” says Alex Vallecillo, a fund manager at PNC Capital Advisors.

Although Atom chips aren’t as powerful as the ones that run PCs, they’re much cheaper, which makes them economical for powering all kinds of devices. Nautilus puts Atom chips into its treadmills to stream Internet video onto built-in displays and upload the times and distances from workouts, Intel Vice-President Doug Davis says. Digital advertising signage is another growth market for Intel, says Alex Gauna, an analyst at JMP Securities in San Francisco. LG Electronics is using Atom chips in signs that will recognize the age, gender, and other characteristics of passersby and change the advertising pitch accordingly—similar to electronic billboards in the 2002 Steven Spielberg science fiction film Minority Report. Since Atoms also use little power and don’t require bulky batteries to run, they’re popping up in unexpected parts of the world. In India, banks are using them in handheld terminals that serve rural areas off the electricity grid. Once a month or so, an itinerant teller visits a village, giving locals access to loans and other banking services.


Image representing Intel as depicted in CrunchBase

Intel is counting on its Atom embedded processors to help break its dependence on the slowing PC market

By Ian King

Two years ago, Intel (INTC) held a contest for college students, asking them to come up with new uses for the company’s Atom processor. One proposal: a shower that regulates water temperature and plays music from the Internet. While Intel doesn’t plan to enter the shower market, it is putting its chips into gas pumps, cars, musical instruments, and other devices where few processors have gone before. Leer más “Intel Wants to Be Inside Everything”

10 Most Dangerous Celebrities…Online

Feeling risky? Go ahead, type Cameron Diaz or Julia Roberts in your Internet search browser, says computer security firm McAfee Inc.

Those two starlets top the company’s annual list of the 10 most dangerous celebrities to search for on the Web.

Diaz and Roberts likely top this year’s because of their recent blockbuster movies, “Knight and Day” for Diaz and “Eat, Pray, Love” for Roberts, and tabloid headline prominence, according to the company.

“Cybercriminals follow the same hot topics as consumers, and create traps based on the latest trends,” said Dave Marcus, security researcher for McAfee Labs, which conducted the study.

This year’s research found that consumers searching for Cameron Diaz pictures or downloads ended up with a 10 percent chance of landing instead on a website with threats like spyware, adware, spam or viruses.

Diaz replaced Jessica Biel, who fell to the third spot, at the top of the list. Supermodel Gisele Bunchden and actor Brad Pitt round out the rest of the top five.


Posted by Katie Kindelan

Feeling risky?  Go ahead, type Cameron Diaz or Julia Roberts in your Internet search browser, says computer security firm McAfee Inc.

Those two starlets top the company’s annual list of the 10 most dangerous celebrities to search for on the Web.

Diaz and Roberts likely top this year’s because of their recent blockbuster movies, “Knight and Day” for Diaz and “Eat, Pray, Love” for Roberts, and tabloid headline prominence, according to the company.

“Cybercriminals follow the same hot topics as consumers, and create traps based on the latest trends,” said Dave Marcus, security researcher for McAfee Labs, which conducted the study.

This year’s research found that consumers searching for Cameron Diaz pictures or downloads ended up with a 10 percent chance of landing instead on a website with threats like spyware, adware, spam or viruses.

Diaz replaced Jessica Biel, who fell to the third spot, at the top of the list.  Supermodel Gisele Bunchden and actor Brad Pitt round out the rest of the top five. Leer más “10 Most Dangerous Celebrities…Online”

Intel, McAfee y la internet de las cosas

La reciente adquisición de McAfee por parte de Intel tiene una lectura muy interesante cuando vemos las notas de prensa que se han publicado sobre ella, y es la derivación del tema hacia la inminente popularización de ese concepto del que llevamos tanto tiempo oyendo hablar: la llamada “internet de las cosas“.

McAfee es una empresa que me evoca recuerdos de los orígenes de la red, muy anteriores a la popularización de Internet: el fichero que más habitualmente nos bajábamos de las BBS a principios de los ‘90 eran las primeras versiones de su antivirus, al principio Viruscan, después la combinación Scan y Clean… eran programas fundamentales en una escuela de negocios con laboratorios dados a la circulación promiscua de ficheros entre cientos de alumnos. Y John McAfee ya estaba allí.


La reciente adquisición de McAfee por parte de Intel tiene una lectura muy interesante cuando vemos las notas de prensa que se han publicado sobre ella, y es la derivación del tema hacia la inminente popularización de ese concepto del que llevamos tanto tiempo oyendo hablar: la llamada “internet de las cosas“.

McAfee es una empresa que me evoca recuerdos de los orígenes de la red, muy anteriores a la popularización de Internet: el fichero que más habitualmente nos bajábamos de las BBS a principios de los ‘90 eran las primeras versiones de su antivirus, al principio Viruscan, después la combinación Scan y Clean… eran programas fundamentales en una escuela de negocios con laboratorios dados a la circulación promiscua de ficheros entre cientos de alumnos. Y John McAfee ya estaba allí. Leer más “Intel, McAfee y la internet de las cosas”

Intel compra a McAfee por 7680 millones de dólares

La mayor empresa fabricante de procesadores , Intel anunció una operación de compra de McAfee por la suma de 7,680 millones de dólares.

Intel compra a la firma de antivirus McAfee por 7680 mdd

Con esto busca implementar una mayor integración entre procesadores y software, con lo cual esperan incrementar la seguridad , sobre todo en dispositivos móviles, los cuales hasta ahora no han considerado el tema de la seguridad tan seriamente. También veremos una mejor integración entre chips y software.

Los miembros de las mesas directivas de ambas compañías han acordado la aprobación, sin embargo especificaron que sólo se espera la anuencia de los accionistas para completar la transacción, la cual al momento no tiene fecha para la aprobación de la operación de compra.

De concretarse la fusión, Intel podría tomar ventaja en cuanto a seguridad, debido a que especializaría su software AV para trabajar con sus procesadores. Lo cual dejaría a su más cercano competidor, Symantec y su AV Norton, en una posición de desventaja.


Autor: Misael Aguilar

La mayor empresa fabricante de procesadores , Intel anunció una operación de compra de McAfee por la suma de 7,680 millones de dólares.

Intel compra a la firma de antivirus McAfee por 7680 mdd

Con esto busca implementar una mayor integración entre procesadores y software, con lo cual esperan incrementar la seguridad , sobre todo en dispositivos móviles, los cuales hasta ahora no han considerado el tema de la seguridad tan seriamente. También veremos una mejor integración entre chips y software.

Los miembros de las mesas directivas de ambas compañías han acordado la aprobación, sin embargo especificaron que sólo se espera la anuencia de los accionistas para completar la transacción, la cual al momento no tiene fecha para la aprobación de la operación de compra.

De concretarse la fusión, Intel podría tomar ventaja en cuanto a seguridad, debido a que especializaría su software AV para trabajar con sus procesadores. Lo cual dejaría a su más cercano competidor, Symantec y su AV Norton, en una posición de desventaja. Leer más “Intel compra a McAfee por 7680 millones de dólares”