WordPress is 10 years old today: Here’s how it’s changed the Web – thnxz @TheNextWeb


WordPress, the blogging and content management system, is 10-years old today.

The platform has evolved in the past decade from being a basic blogging service to something that has helped people and brands become more social and changed how we communicate on the Web.

157762876 520x370 WordPress is 10 years old today: Heres how its changed the Web
By 

Started by Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little, WordPress is an open source service where anyone can make modifications to the code to improve their blog and make it something that works for them.

Bloggers who use WordPress are able to apply design themes to their sites while also integrating third-party plugins easily. Since it’s open source software, there isn’t a need for an approval process before someone can implement a new feature.

As of this writing, the latest version of WordPress has been downloaded more than 21 million times.

Has it already been a decade?

For Mullenweg, hitting the decade mark was a bit startling for him. In a blog post, he waxed nostalgia about the platform he helped create:

Has it really been 10 years? It seems just yesterday we were playing around on my blog, and the blogs of a few high school friends. Two of those friends are married, one isn’t anymore, two are still figuring things out, and one has passed away.

You were cute before you became beautiful. Wearing black and white, afraid of color, trying to be so unassuming. I know you got jealous when I wore those Blogger t-shirts. They were the cool kids at SxSW and I thought maybe you could grow up to be like them.

You wouldn’t have shirts of your own for a few more years. We didn’t know what we were doing when we made them and the logo printed ginormous. People called them the Superman shirt and made fun of them. But, oh, that logo — the curves fit you so well.

WordPress emerged onto the scene when users had the option of posting their thoughts on services like XangaLiveJournalMySpace, and Blogger. One difference between all of these other systems and WordPress was the option for users to simply download the platform and install it right onto their own servers. With this self-hosted model, Mullenweg managed to help make it more accessible and flexible for not only users, but for businesses who wanted more control.

Taking WordPress on the road

Leer más “WordPress is 10 years old today: Here’s how it’s changed the Web – thnxz @TheNextWeb”

Tools for Managing Multiple WordPress Sites | sixrevisions.com


 

5 Tools for Managing Multiple WordPress Sites from One Location

If you run more than one WordPress install, or if you have clients that run WordPress sites that you’re responsible for, then you know how much of a pain it can be to log in to each site every time you need to do things like update plugins, themes, or WordPress core itself.

With the release of WordPress 3.0, we now have the ability to create a network of WordPress sites with one installation through the multisite feature. However, your needs may go beyond what multisite allows you to do, and so you may need to explore other options.

Fortunately, there are a number of solutions out there that will let you manage multiple WordPress websites from one central location. In this article, I’ll share some options with you and give you a brief overview of each.

1. WP Remote

WP Remote

WP Remote is a simple and free solution that will allow you to do a few basic tasks related to managing multiple WordPress sites.

While you do need to install the WP Remote plugin for each WordPress installation, your administration panel for managing your sites is in one central location on the WP Remote site.

Here’s a look at the simple control panel on the WP Remote site:

WP Remote Features

  • Bulk update all WordPress installations
  • Create off-site backups
  • Update plugins that can be updated via the WordPress plugin page
  • Update themes that can be updated via the WordPress themes page

2. InfiniteWP

InfiniteWP

InfiniteWP is on a freemium model. (In other words, basic features are free, but you’ll need to pay for other feature upgrades such as auto-scheduling of WordPress site backups.)

Below is a video by the creators of InfiniteWP that will give you an idea of what the tool looks like:

InfiniteWP Free Features

The basic features of InfiniteWP are basic indeed, but they’re also pretty handy, and so many of us may not need the premium/paid features this plugin has. The basic features include the following:

  • One-click updates for the latest version of WordPress
  • Install and manage themes
  • Install and manage plugins
  • The ability to restore, download, and delete backups

InfiniteWP Premium Features

There are currently six available premium features available (with three more in the works). These are the currently available addons:

  • Install WordPress
  • Clone a WordPress installation
  • Schedule automated backups
  • Back up to repositories
  • Manage WordPress users
  • Save and run custom PHP code on multiple sites
  • Brand the InfiniteWP plugin with your company name or hide the plugin altogether

The premium addons currently in the works are the following:

  • Integration with Google Analytics
  • Manage posts and comments on multiple sites
  • Bulk create Posts, Pages, and Links

3. ManageWP   >>>>>>   Leer más “Tools for Managing Multiple WordPress Sites | sixrevisions.com”

For-Profit Automattic Gives WordPress Trademark To Non-Profit Foundation

“It’s not often you see a for-profit company donate one of their most valuable core assets and give up control,” Automattic founder Matt Mullenweg writes today in a post announcing that the WordPress trademark has been transfered from his company to the WordPress Foundation. “This is a really big deal,” he continues.

What this means is that the key ingredient behind Automattic is now in the hands of the organization in charge of “promoting and ensuring access to WordPress and related open source projects in perpetuity.” So why do this? Mullenweg says it has been his goal since the beginning to blend a non-profit business, a for-profit one, and not-just-for-profit one under one banner. Now that he feels each of those aspects is stable enough, he wants that main banner, WordPress, to be “protected” as a “beacon for open source freedom.”


It’s not often you see a for-profit company donate one of their most valuable core assets and give up control,” Automattic founder Matt Mullenweg writes today in a post announcing that the WordPress trademark has been transfered from his company to the WordPress Foundation. “This is a really big deal,” he continues.

What this means is that the key ingredient behind Automattic is now in the hands of the organization in charge of “promoting and ensuring access to WordPress and related open source projects in perpetuity.” So why do this? Mullenweg says it has been his goal since the beginning to blend a non-profit business, a for-profit one, and not-just-for-profit one under one banner. Now that he feels each of those aspects is stable enough, he wants that main banner, WordPress, to be “protected” as a “beacon for open source freedom.” Leer más “For-Profit Automattic Gives WordPress Trademark To Non-Profit Foundation”