Desafíos en formación ejecutiva: “El pasado dorado de los MBA no garantiza su futuro”


Los MBA han cumplido más de 100 años

campus.iprofesional.com
Via   http://www.arriverrhh.com.arMás de un centenar de decanos y profesores de escuelas de negocios de América latina, representantes empresariales y agencias de acreditación internacionales se reunieron estos días en Harvard para analizar un estudio realizado por el Programa Académico Internacional (IAP) y la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.

Éste se basó en una encuesta realizada en 27 países latinoamericanos, y participaron un centenar de decanos de escuelas de negocios y más de 120 dirigentes empresariales, coordinados por el HBS Latin America Research Center.
Supone el desarrollo de la iniciativa “Rethinking the MBA” (Repensar el MBA) puesta en marcha hace unos años por el profesor Srikant Datar de la Harvard Business School.
A 100 años de la creación de las maestrías en administración de negocios, la academia se cuestiona si las escuelas pueden seguir en la dirección de siempre mientras el mundo cambia a su alrededor. Desde la Universidad de Madrid, en asociación con Harvard, invitan a repensar este consagrado programa.
En ese marco, corresponde plantearse, cuando los MBA han cumplido más de 100 años ¿las escuelas de negocios pueden seguir en la dirección de siempre mientras el mundo cambia a su alrededor?
En esta época nacen y se transforman las formas de aprender y de enseñar. Cambian los modos de comunicarse, las sociedades, las tecnologías, las dimensiones de los negocios y los propios conceptos de lo que es negocio. Son distintos los directivos, las empresas y sus necesidades; son diferentes los profesores y los estudiantes.Artículo Completo

Mindfulness Helps You Become a Better Leader


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

To keep your equilibrium, practice meditation (or something like it) every day.

Ever since the financial crisis of 2008, I have sensed from many leaders that they want to do a better job of leading in accordance with their personal values. The crisis exposed the fallacies of measuring success in monetary terms and left many leaders with a deep feeling of unease that they were being pulled away from what I call their True North.

As markets rose and bonus pools grew, it was all too easy to celebrate the rising tide of wealth without examining the process that created it. Too many leaders placed self-interest ahead of their organizations’ interests, and ended up disappointing the customers, employees, and shareholders who had trusted them. I often advise emerging leaders, “You know you’re in trouble when you start to judge your self-worth by your net worth.” Nevertheless, many leaders get caught up in this game without realizing it.

This happened to me in 1988, when I was an executive vice president at Honeywell, en route to the top. By external standards I was highly successful, but inside I was deeply unhappy. I had begun to focus too much on impressing other people and positioning myself to become CEO. I was caught up with external measures of success instead of looking inward to measure my success as a human and a leader. I was losing my way. Leer más “Mindfulness Helps You Become a Better Leader”

What is an Elevator Pitch? Is Your Elevator Pitch Ready?


freelanceswitch.com
Debbie Swanson | Freelance Marketing

When was the last time you’d heard that phrase? I hadn’t heard it in years, until a recent assignment for a magazine article led me to sit in on a local networking meeting. As I took my seat, the woman I was sitting next to drew me aside.
“After the general business, each person can stand up and give a 60 second elevator pitch,” she whispered.
I hoped my confident smile hid my panic. The last time I’d even thought about an elevator pitch was back in college. As I listened to the other members, I felt some relief. Some speeches were smart and polished, like the business designer who opened with “Is your brand in black and white? I can provide the color..” but others were completely informal “I’m laid off, I’ve been cleaning out the attic…”

By the time it was my turn I had worked out something better than the attic cleaner’s speech but not as good as the polished designer’s. Happy to have gotten past that, I was left with a nagging sense of unfinished business. I realized that when friends or acquaintances ask me what I do for a living, I don’t take the opportunity to boost my business. I decided to take my ‘elevator pitch’ more seriously.

What is an Elevator Pitch? Leer más “What is an Elevator Pitch? Is Your Elevator Pitch Ready?”

The “right” time for innovation

So it actually all comes down to this – my prospects and clients need to understand when the “right” time for innovation is. After all, what we usually hear from executives is that “this isn’t the right time” for innovation. Not that they don’t want innovation, or don’t need innovation, or that innovation is too risky or expensive. No, the usual response is that this simply isn’t the “right” time.

So, in the interest of public edification I decided to conduct a thought experiment, out loud. What, I asked myself, are the appropriate conditions so that one can identify the “right time” for innovation.

First I considered the most obvious time. That most obvious time for innovation is when the wind is behind you, the sun on your face and the markets can’t get enough of your products and services. In other words, the ideal time to innovate would seem to be when you are on top of the world. However, a note of caution creeps in. We don’t want to distract from our good run by taking good people and have them explore new ideas – that’s a distraction. We certainly don’t want to kill the golden goose by identifying new products and service that will cannibalize our best products and services, and we ought to “double down” on what’s making us successful right now.

So, even though these conditions would seem ripe for innovation, there are too many other activities consuming the management team to seriously consider innovation when they are on top.


by Jeffrey Phillip
http://innovateonpurpose.blogspot.com/

So it actually all comes down to this – my prospects and clients need to understand when the “right” time for innovation is.  After all, what we usually hear from executives is that “this isn’t the right time” for innovation.  Not that they don’t want innovation, or don’t need innovation, or that innovation is too risky or expensive.  No, the usual response is that this simply isn’t the “right” time.

So, in the interest of public edification I decided to conduct a thought experiment, out loud.  What, I asked myself, are the appropriate conditions so that one can identify the “right time” for innovation.

First I considered the most obvious time.  That most obvious time for innovation is when the wind is behind you, the sun on your face and the markets can’t get enough of your products and services.  In other words, the ideal time to innovate would seem to be when you are on top of the world.  However, a note of caution creeps in.  We don’t want to distract from our good run by taking good people and have them explore new ideas – that’s a distraction.  We certainly don’t want to kill the golden goose by identifying new products and service that will cannibalize our best products and services, and we ought to “double down” on what’s making us successful right now.

So, even though these conditions would seem ripe for innovation, there are too many other activities consuming the management team to seriously consider innovation when they are on top. Leer más “The “right” time for innovation”

Promises Aren’t Enough


//sloanreview.mit.edu

By Rodrigo Canales, B. Cade Massey and Amy Wrzesniewski
Business schools need to do a better job teaching students values


It is a sign of the times that hundreds of Harvard Business School’s 2009 and 2010 graduates took “The MBA Oath.” These students promised to “serve the greater good,” act ethically, and refrain from pursuing greed at others’ expense.

We are inspired that students who will soon be in positions of leadership vow to reject the temptations their predecessors could not. But they and the more than 100,000 new M.B.A. students who enrolled this year will need more than an oath if they wish to become ethical business leaders. Simply put, such oaths sound much like chastity vows taken by thousands of teens every year. The problem in both cases is not a lack of sincerity, but a failure to adequately prepare for the moment of truth.

Just Words

Like a chastity vow, the M.B.A. oath has an unstated assumption that those who have gone before are somehow different: They had weaker wills, less resolve, looser morals. The oath is meant to signal a stronger commitment to values. The danger is the false sense of moral inoculation such oaths engender. Just as teenagers who take a chastity vow in lieu of better sexual education are more vulnerable to the consequences of unprotected sex—vow takers are actually more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior—M.B.A.s who take an ethics oath without enough supporting leadership education are likely more vulnerable to ethical breaches.

Executive Adviser

Innovations in management theory & business strategy – a collaboration with The Wall Street Journal

The power of the situation, and our too frequent disregard for it, is an overarching lesson from sociology and social psychology. Situational forces drive behavior to a surprising extent, much more than expected by those who believe character determines all.

This lesson has been implicated in one scandal after another, from Enron to Abu Ghraib. Pledges made without the benefit of experience with compromising situations, and without some kind of supporting structure, actually exacerbate the problem.

Six things about deadlines


by Seth Godin

  1. People don’t like deadlines. They mean a decision, shipping and risk. They force us to decide.
  2. Deadlines work. Products that are about to disappear, auctions that are about to end, tickets that are about to sell out–they create forward motion. Leer más “Six things about deadlines”