So does your blog, book or ebook have contagious attributes?


English: Logo of Academic Project publishers.

Typical communication in the age of mass media start with two steps

  1. Mass Media to Network Hubs
  2. Network Hubs to the rest of the population

But “Buzz” refuses to follow neat patterns. Cold Mountain’s buzz didn’t start from the traditional marketers text book .

So what made the book spread? What were the contagious attributes? >>>>>  Leer más “So does your blog, book or ebook have contagious attributes?”

Un nuevo tratamiento hará que el vino siente mejor

Procedimiento

La cepa de P. citrinum es capaz de degradar elevadas concentraciones de histamina, tiramina y putrescina, tres de las aminas biógenas mayoritarias en vinos.

Estos compuestos se forman durante la producción de los alimentos fermentados por la acción de bacterias lácticas, que convierten los aminoácidos precursores en las correspondientes aminas.

Para la obtención de los extractos fúngicos activos en este procedimiento, los investigadores han empleado un sistema de microfermentación con un medio de cultivo básico, suplementado con histamina, tiramina o putrescina como única fuente de nitrógeno.

Con ello se pretende inducir la actividad amino oxidasa de los hongos inoculados.

“Las concentraciones habituales de aminas biógenas no suponen un riesgo para la salud del consumidor, ya que el tracto digestivo del ser humano posee un eficiente mecanismo de detoxificación, compuesto principalmente por dos enzimas: la monoaminooxidasa y la diaminoxidasa. Estas enzimas transforman las aminas en metabolitos no tóxicos que el cuerpo acaba excretando. Sin embargo, en individuos sensibles, con los sistemas de detoxificación alterados, puede existir cierto riesgo de reacciones alérgicas, trastornos digestivos o migrañas”, añade la investigadora del CSIC.


tendencias21.netReducirá las aminas biógenas de esta bebida, y con ellas el riesgo de reacciones alérgicas, trastornos digestivos o migrañas derivados de su consumo

Las aminas biógenas son compuestos nitrogenados que están presentes de forma natural en alimentos y bebidas fermentadas. En bajas concentraciones, desempeñan un papel esencial en el desarrollo de funciones metabólicas y fisiológicas en humanos, animales y plantas. Sin embargo, en altas concentraciones y en personas sensibles, pueden tener efectos negativos en el organismo. Un estudio liderado por el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) ha desarrollado un nuevo tratamiento de origen natural para reducir las aminas biógenas del vino. CSIC/T21.

 

Las aminas biógenas son compuestos nitrogenados que están presentes de forma natural en alimentos y bebidas fermentadas. En bajas concentraciones, desempeñan un papel esencial en el desarrollo de funciones metabólicas y fisiológicas en humanos, animales y plantas. 

Sin embargo, en altas concentraciones y en personas sensibles, pueden tener efectos negativos en el organismo. Un estudio liderado por el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) ha desarrollado un nuevo tratamiento de origen natural para reducir las aminas biógenas del vino. La investigación ha sido publicada en la revista Journal of Applied Microbiology

“El procedimiento, probado en vinos blancos y tintos, se basa en el empleo de extractos enzimáticos del hongo Penicillium citrinum. Este hongo proviene de la vid, lo que permite que la materia prima de la que se obtiene el vino sea al mismo tiempo la fuente natural del principio activo”, explica la investigadora del CSIC Victoria Moreno-Arribas, del Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias de la Alimentación, instituto mixto del CSIC y la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Leer más “Un nuevo tratamiento hará que el vino siente mejor”

Designing Engaging And Enjoyable Long-Form Reading Experiences

Changing the navigation methods may be as straightforward as removing redundant menu bars or as involved as conducting user research to see which methods people use and don’t use.

Another thing to consider when looking at navigation usage patterns is that people rarely click on things that appear hard to read or cluttered. If that’s the case with your website, perhaps it’s time to look at your typography and spacing.

Experimenting With Type And Spacing

Not every typeface was designed to be read on a digital screen. Typefaces can have a huge effect on both the appeal of content and its readability. The typefaces for headlines may be beautiful and attention-grabbing, but if the ones for the copy are difficult to read, you could be turning away readers.

Not everyone will read your content exactly as it was designed. Some people set their own default font size, while others change their screen’s resolution. Still others use assistive technology, such as screen readers, to peruse content. During the course of a day, I read blogs on my iPad, pan and zoom through news on my mobile phone, edit documents on
an enormous desktop monitor and browse the Web from my television screen (at low resolution). For this same reason, tools such as Instapaper, Readability and Evernote are growing massively. The ability to control the format of what you read — and where you read it — is becoming increasingly useful.

The Boston Globe’s recent overhaul of its website received a lot of well-deserved praise, and two of the nicest things about it are the use of white space and the typography. The fonts chosen are central to the Boston Globe’s Web style, and they feel relevant to its almost 240-year-old print identity. Compare the new design to the original one, and the contrast is staggering. The Boston Globe’s new look is a great case study for news websites and readability in general. Definitely have a look if you haven’t yet.


http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com

Finally, some good news from the media industry: digital subscriptions are growing. We’re seeing positive reports from newspapers such as the New York Times and magazine publishers such as Conde Nast: announcements about increases in their digital content sales and paywall members.

When you have fantastic and original content, ensuring the best possible reading experience is critical to keeping and building your audience. The following practices will help you design your content in a way that improves the experience for readers.

[Note: A must-have for professional Web designers and developers: The Printed Smashing Books Bundle is full of practical insight for your daily work. Get the bundle right away!]

Navigation Methods

We often think that having many methods for finding things is easier for users. Unfortunately, the result can be mess of unhelpful and unrelated links, menus, widgets and ads. Many news websites place lists of “most-read articles” or “articles that your Facebook friends are reading” on their websites because they can. Analytics will tell you whether these methods are useful for your particular website. If no one is clicking on them, why are they taking up valuable space?

One way to quickly see the effect of slimmed-down navigation is to use Ochs, a Chrome browser extension specifically for the New York Times, written by Michael Donohoe. Open the New York Times in a different browser, then install Ochs and look at the website in Chrome. Ochs provides the massive benefit of a cleaner layout and clutter-free navigation. Things like reading tools and extra modules are removed from articles. The increased white space and removal of the New York Times’ dense navigation bars are a breath of fresh air.

New York Times with Ochs extension
The Ochs extension cleans up the UI of the New York Times. Leer más “Designing Engaging And Enjoyable Long-Form Reading Experiences”

10 Ways In Which The Media Industry Is Embracing Twitter

We all know how much of a growth curve Twitter has been on over the last couple of years and if there is one industry that has embraced it with great gusto it is the various strands of the media industry. They’ve hyped it up and brought it to the masses, integrated it in to their media as well as relying on it for breaking stories and and angles on news stories. Twitter has clearly changed the way that we all consume news and how the news finds us and we are watching people within the media have to adapt right in front of our eyes. It’s still something that is evolving as the big media organizations relinquish some of the control they have had over the message for so long and the next couple of years will be an incredibly interesting time. I wanted to look at some of the ways in which the media is engaging with Twitter…
Linking To Articles

This is fairly common and I think people are coming to expect it. It can get slightly tiresome if somebody is writing 10 articles a day and linking to them all but the main reason I would follow a journalist I respect on Twitter would be to get their latest stories instead of using RSS so having links there is not an issue for me. It does help if people mark their stories clearly and say that they are linking through to their own work so as it gives you the choice. Below is a perfect example of linking with full transparency…


 

We all know how much of a growth curve Twitter has been on over the last couple of years and if there is one industry that has embraced it with great gusto it is the various strands of the media industry. They’ve hyped it up and brought it to the masses, integrated it in to their media as well as relying on it for breaking stories and and angles on news stories. Twitter has clearly changed the way that we all consume news and how the news finds us and we are watching people within the media have to adapt right in front of our eyes. It’s still something that is evolving as the big media organizations relinquish some of the control they have had over the message for so long and the next couple of years will be an incredibly interesting time. I wanted to look at some of the ways in which the media is engaging with Twitter…

Linking To Articles

This is fairly common and I think people are coming to expect it. It can get slightly tiresome if somebody is writing 10 articles a day and linking to them all but the main reason I would follow a journalist I respect on Twitter would be to get their latest stories instead of using RSS so having links there is not an issue for me. It does help if people mark their stories clearly and say that they are linking through to their own work so as it gives you the choice. Below is a perfect example of linking with full transparency…
Leer más “10 Ways In Which The Media Industry Is Embracing Twitter”

The 25/200 Rule Of Marketing and Sales

Early in my career, I learned a valuable rule that’s changed my life.

“Reduce the time it takes for your prospect to decide on you by 25% and the result will be a 200% increase in sales.” This concept speculates that we lose much of our business in the sales funnel, while the customer is trying to make a decision about your product in the face of competition and objections.

During this time, new competitors enter the mix or circumstances change – making your product less desirable or unnecessary. This is why in sales we stress urgency. This is why in marketing we emphasize branding (as a shortcut to quality). In my Yahoo career, I witnessed this in the field. In my speaking career, I see this every day.

For example, if your book is a smash hit and your name is on everyone’s tongues (Consider @Tony’s success with Delivering Happiness), then the meeting planner can instantly agree on you, because she knows her boss wants you because he’s reading your book and giving it to all his friends. This is what JIm Collins experienced in 2002 when his speaking business picked up more than five fold!

So here’s the takeaway: Focus efforts every day on reducing the time it takes to say yes to your product.


//sanderssays.typepad.com/

Chart-sales-up-300x299

Early in my career, I learned a valuable rule that’s changed my life.

“Reduce the time it takes for your prospect to decide on you by 25% and the result will be a 200% increase in sales.”  This concept speculates that we lose much of our business in the sales funnel, while the customer is trying to make a decision about your product in the face of competition and objections.

During this time, new competitors enter the mix or circumstances change – making your product less desirable or unnecessary.  This is why in sales we stress urgency.  This is why in marketing we emphasize branding (as a shortcut to quality).  In my Yahoo career, I witnessed this in the field.  In my speaking career, I see this every day.

For example, if your book is a smash hit and your name is on everyone’s tongues (Consider @Tony’s success with Delivering Happiness), then the meeting planner can instantly agree on you, because she knows her boss wants you because he’s reading your book and giving it to all his friends.  This is what JIm Collins experienced in 2002 when his speaking business picked up more than five fold!

So here’s the takeaway: Focus efforts every day on reducing the time it takes to say yes to your product. Leer más “The 25/200 Rule Of Marketing and Sales”

The Economist and the Human Potential

If TED is about “Ideas Worth Spreading,” then the Economist’s Ideas Economy conference series is – as the title would suggest – about ideas worth monetizing. It’s the Economist, stupid! The venerable publication, a notorious late adopter, has realized that despite solid market standing it must reinvent itself to survive, both through a suite of new digital products and by branching out into the conference business. The focus on Innovation (as in “a commercialized original idea,” as the excellent moderator Vijay Vaitheeswaran defined it in his opening remarks) is a natural fit: The Economist has always stood for liberal economic policies and liberal social values – which is typically the kind of fabric that innovation thrives in.


By Tim Leberecht – //designmind.frogdesign.com

If TED is about “Ideas Worth Spreading,” then the Economist’s Ideas Economy conference series is – as the title would suggest – about ideas worth monetizing. It’s the Economist, stupid! The venerable publication, a notorious late adopter, has realized that despite solid market standing it must reinvent itself to survive, both through a suite of new digital products and by branching out into the conference business. The focus on Innovation (as in “a commercialized original idea,” as the excellent moderator Vijay Vaitheeswaran defined it in his opening remarks) is a natural fit: The Economist has always stood for liberal economic policies and liberal social values – which is typically the kind of fabric that innovation thrives in.

The most recent event of the series (full disclosure: frog design was a sponsor) took place last week in New York: With the theme “Human Potential,” 250 business leaders, entrepreneurs, politicians, and academics discussed for two days how to foster and tap into the creativity and intellect of their employees, stakeholders, peers, and students. The cynic could object and ask “Do we indeed have potential?,” inferring that the term “potential” implies progress and betterment – but are we, humans, even good? And if so, can we get better?

According to Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker, the answer is a clear yes. He presented a “history of violence,” arguing that violence is on the decline, which, as he readily admitted, appears to be somewhat counter-intuitive, knowing that there has not been a single day without war in the history of mankind. Attribute this to a recording bias: The magnifying effect of mass media makes violence more visible than ever before. Yet, Pinker cited empirical studies showing that the amount of actions which cause physical harm has steadily decreased over the past centuries. Despite the many atrocities it saw, the 20th century was not the most violent century in terms of absolute numbers (compared to the total world population), and acts of terrorism, Pinker pointed out, can only be described as (statistically) “insignificant.” Clearly, Pinker commented, the US overreacted in response to the 9/11 attacks. Before you cheer about the rise of human enlightenment and moral reasoning, however, consider that the way violence is committed may have become more subliminal, and that, more pressingly, weapons of mass destruction in the hands of a few rogue individuals (or states) can arguably do more harm nowadays – that is, cause ‘ultimate violence’ – than ever before. Additionally, it remains difficult to project future trends based on historical data so that an overly optimistic, non-violent concept of human potential might be flawed because of a bias of retrospective. In fact, the Rational Optimist‘s great blind spot is that it cannot look into the “heart of darkness,” that it has no means to explain or forecast truly irrational behavior.

On top of that, it is, of course, particularly hard to assess the human potential when you are human. Is human potential limited to humans? Can humans really fully unleash their own potential or will it take artificial intelligence to do so? Were the attendees in New York able to realize human potential or rather its impediment? The conference, for the most part, stayed away from such provocations. Notwithstanding the occasional excursion into macro-economic or philosophical debate, most of the program was devoted to more pragmatic topics such as employee motivation, knowledge management, institutional and non-institutional learning, and creative thinking. Leer más “The Economist and the Human Potential”

When Twitter becomes real life. Where’s the line?

I saw something happening on Twitter a few days ago, and ever since then I’ve been thinking more and more about the role it plays in our lives and at what point it actually stops becoming something that we ‘do’ and actually starts to replace real life altogether. I don’t want to name the person involved in the incident, but they were very publicly tweeting about something upsetting, as it was happening. As much as I was upset by what they were going through, when I stopped and thought about it, I realised how disturbed I was by the fact that this person had chosen to tweet about this thing, as it happened, instead of giving it the real attention it needed. It was as if Twitter had replaced the real-life situation and it was incredibly strange to watch it happening.

Twitter has always been a different animal. Never quite hitting the mainstream in the way that Facebook has, yet always finding itself in the headlines (or responsible for them). It has hugely affected online communication in ways that we never could have imagined in its early days. But it has had such an odd effect on so many people (myself included). I’m sure I’m not the only one that will think, when something particularly exciting happens or you spot a celeb etc.. that you can’t wait to put it out on Twitter. You think this, even as you’re going through something and you almost forget to enjoy it or notice it as you’re composing your tweet in your head. I find it fascinating that for so many people it’s fundamentally changed every human experience.


//thenextweb.com
By Lauren Fisher

I saw something happening on Twitter a few days ago, and ever since then I’ve been thinking more and more about the role it plays in our lives and at what point it actually stops becoming something that we ‘do’ and actually starts to replace real life altogether. I don’t want to name the person involved in the incident, but they were very publicly tweeting about something upsetting, as it was happening. As much as I was upset by what they were going through, when I stopped and thought about it, I realised how disturbed I was by the fact that this person had chosen to tweet about this thing, as it happened, instead of giving it the real attention it needed. It was as if Twitter had replaced the real-life situation and it was incredibly strange to watch it happening.

Twitter has always been a different animal. Never quite hitting the mainstream in the way that Facebook has, yet always finding itself in the headlines (or responsible for them). It has hugely affected online communication in ways that we never could have imagined in its early days. But it has had such an odd effect on so many people (myself included). I’m sure I’m not the only one that will think, when something particularly exciting happens or you spot a celeb etc.. that you can’t wait to put it out on Twitter. You think this, even as you’re going through something and you almost forget to enjoy it or notice it as you’re composing your tweet in your head. I find it fascinating that for so many people it’s fundamentally changed every human experience.

Your other Twitter life

I think this has contributed to many people almost creating a ‘Twitter self’ that needs to be maintained. I’m often surprised for example, when I see couples talking with each other on Twitter when I know they’re in the same room. But I’ve realised now that it’s not so much about using Twitter as a way of talking to someone next to you, but more contributing to the content around your online self, and talking to your online community. Your Twitter self is something that has to be maintained and so in this way, it almost starts to take over from your real self. For all the benefits of Twitter and all the ways it can enhance your life, there comes a point when it almost replaces your life. And it’s easy to forget this, because it’s just somehow not the same as sitting in front of a chat window. In that case it’s always there and it’s pretty much all you’re doing. But Twitter can run in the background while you watch telly, you can dip in every now and again and work and it doesn’t seem like all you’re doing is reading updates that actually have nothing to do with your work. Leer más “When Twitter becomes real life. Where’s the line?”

Steve Jobs, Apple | MARKETER OF THE YEAR 2010

Apple CEO Steve Jobs is having none of this. As everyone knows, Apple’s success is based at least in part on opacity. The brand has no Facebook or Twitter page, doesn’t respond to media requests (including one from this publication) and sometimes uses heavy-handed tactics to censor information. Apple’s mania for secrecy reached its apogee with the iPad.

While some news outlets accurately predicted the device’s debut (and its name!) seven months early, not a peep came from headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., until Jobs’ official announcement on Jan. 27. By then, bloggers had whipped up so much buzz that the iPad announcement nearly eclipsed the State of the Union address the next day.


By Todd Wasserman

In 2010, the standard advice for marketers is: Be transparent. Embrace social media. Start a dialogue with your audience.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs is having none of this. As everyone knows, Apple’s success is based at least in part on opacity. The brand has no Facebook or Twitter page, doesn’t respond to media requests (including one from this publication) and sometimes uses heavy-handed tactics to censor information. Apple’s mania for secrecy reached its apogee with the iPad.

While some news outlets accurately predicted the device’s debut (and its name!) seven months early, not a peep came from headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., until Jobs’ official announcement on Jan. 27. By then, bloggers had whipped up so much buzz that the iPad announcement nearly eclipsed the State of the Union address the next day.

It’s easy to conclude now, as sales of the iPad have surpassed 3 million units, that the device’s success was preordained. But industry watchers credit the marketing. Leer más “Steve Jobs, Apple | MARKETER OF THE YEAR 2010”

The internet has become a big popularity contest

To explain very simply why I believe the internet has become a popularity game, is to look at all the data and numbers that’s now publicly visible to practically anyone. You can see someone’s Twitter followers vs how many they’re following, Facebook friends, number of comments on a blog post, number of retweets, replies in a forum thread and many other metrics. And however much we like to admit that we don’t care about numbers, it can’t help but set a level of pre-judgement. If you get followed by someone with 100,000 followers and they’re only following 100, you’ll feel pretty special and the chances are you’ll give them some of your time. If you come across a blog post with 200 retweets, you’ll probably spend more time reading it than you would have otherwise, and if that seems like a constant pattern in their blog, you’ll probably subscribe. There are so many numbers out there that can’t help but have an effect on the actions we take and how much of an effort we go to engage with someone. And biased as I like to be, I don’t believe anyone that says they’re not influenced by big numbers on some level, even if it’s not the determining factor to follow, read, retweet etc..

I find this quite unnatural and still haven’t quite got used to the fact that everyone gets to basically see how popular I am on online. It seems to recycle the secondary school popularity game. As you get older popularity becomes less and less important, but with social media it brings it back again. Getting a retweet from the Mike Butchers of this world has the effect of almost validating us online and makes you realise just what a funny game it is.


Author of The internet has become a big popularity contest
by Lauren Fisher in Social Media

191190035 5d426ecd50 The internet has become a big popularity contestI’ve touched on this subject in recent posts but I thought it was time to write a dedicated post about the popularity game that’s currently going on through the internet, and more specifically social media. This post may seem negative and I just want to make it clear that I absolutely recognise all the benefits of social media – how it’s opened up communities and dialogues and provided companies with a completely new way to do business, one that’s more genuine and honest than anything that’s gone before. I really think I’m working in one of the most interesting communication channels there has ever been. But there is also a downside to social media, and that’s how it’s made us focus on popularity and numbers. And it feels quite unnatural. Leer más “The internet has become a big popularity contest”

Blogging And Mass Psychomanipulation

If I ever write another book it will probably be about one of three topics. The first is the truth about how the press and journalism really works – the sausage making – to show just how much of a beautiful, subjective and chaotic mess it all is. The second idea is to talk about how perfect blogging is, with its constant feedback loop, as a training ground for mass psychology and manipulation. The third idea I’m keeping to myself for now, but it’s more startup focused.

It’s the second one that’s been on my mind lately. Mostly because it’s become pretty clear to me that any blogger worth her salt could start, say, an extremely successful militant religious cult.

Any blogger will tell you how frustrating the early days are. Getting someone, anyone, to link to you. Your first comment! etc. And as your audience grows you are introduced to the first rule of anonymous human behavior – it’s dark and brutal, and reminds me how thin the veil of civilized behavior really is. If there is something nasty that can be said, someone will say it. Over and over.


If I ever write another book it will probably be about one of three topics. The first is the truth about how the press and journalism really works – the sausage making – to show just how much of a beautiful, subjective and chaotic mess it all is. The second idea is to talk about how perfect blogging is, with its constant feedback loop, as a training ground for mass psychology and manipulation. The third idea I’m keeping to myself for now, but it’s more startup focused.

It’s the second one that’s been on my mind lately. Mostly because it’s become pretty clear to me that any blogger worth her salt could start, say, an extremely successful militant religious cult.

Any blogger will tell you how frustrating the early days are. Getting someone, anyone, to link to you. Your first comment! etc. And as your audience grows you are introduced to the first rule of anonymous human behavior – it’s dark and brutal, and reminds me how thin the veil of civilized behavior really is. If there is something nasty that can be said, someone will say it. Over and over. Leer más “Blogging And Mass Psychomanipulation”

A Plan to Invent the Marketing We Need Today

The discipline of marketing hasn’t kept up with the rapid changes facing 21st-century businesses. New scholarship doesn’t have enough management relevance, and practicing marketers are too often forsaking rigor. Here are seven strategies that can make marketing both relevant and rigorous in today’s world.

The world in which marketing operates has fundamentally changed. Thomas Friedman has sketched the outline of the new realities of our “flat world” and Kenichi Ohmae has discussed the requirements of operating on “the new global stage.”1 The rise of China, India and other emerging economies has demanded new market strategies to reach developing countries. Technologies from the Internet to biotechnology are fundamentally changing science and society. At the same time, social concerns from environmental impact to corporate social responsibility are changing the relationships of companies to the societies in which they operate. [Más…]

New channels and technologies are transforming the media through which marketing works. Virtual worlds such as Second Life are giving new meaning to the concept of “place” in marketing. Collaborative projects such as open source software and Wikipedia are transforming the consumer into a cocreator. Movies and entertainment have broken out of the television box and into the iPod, cell phones and computers. The broadcast has been transformed into the podcast. TiVo and other technological innovations have made the mass media more customized, eliminating the predictability of traditional advertising.
The Changing Context

It is no wonder that some of the marketing concepts and models that were developed in the last century are no longer relevant today. There have been dramatic changes in the environment that require us to rethink our approaches to marketing. Among these changes are:

* Post-9/11 global terrorism
* A turbulent global economy
* The pervasive impact of the Internet and constant advances in information and communication technologies
* Continued advances in science and technology-based inventions
* The empowered hybrid consumer who expects customized products and services, messages and distribution channels
* The reluctant consumer — with declining response rates, TiVo and increasingly negative attitudes toward marketing and advertising
* Decreased consumer and employee loyalty
* The vanishing mass market and increased fragmentation of all markets
* A blurring of the line between B2B and B2C
* The rising importance of the developing world
* Opportunities for outsourcing and digital outsourcing/offshoring of marketing services (beyond call centers)
* Increased focus on public/private cooperation (nongovernmental organizations and others)

This world has led to a new breed of consumers. They expect customization (make it mine), communities (let me be a part of it), multiple channels (let me call, click or visit), competitive value (give me more for my money) and choice (give me search and decision tools).2 The era of the passive consumer is history. Empowered consumers are increasingly in control, which dramatically changes the role of marketing. This shift in relationship between consumers and companies is the most fundamental change in the history of marketing, even more dramatic than the historic shift from a product orientation to a market orientation.

Of course, there are limits to these shifts. Consumers may expect more, but there is more pressure on their time — so while they may be given the opportunity to cocreate customized solutions, some segments may in the end just want that standardized product off the shelf.

Has marketing research and practice kept pace with the emerging new realities? Most marketing is too focused on the developed world rather than the developing world, where many future opportunities lie. With increasing pressure for organic growth, marketing has been called upon to play a broader role in the company, but is it ready to take a seat at the corporate table? There is a need for greater collaboration with finance, operations and other areas of the company, but is marketing too isolated as a discipline?

Through its maturation as a discipline over the past half century, marketing has emerged as a rigorous field. Tools such as conjoint analysis, economic and econometric modeling, behavioral economics, data mining, and techniques derived from mathematical psychology have raised the level of rigor and strengthened the insights that marketing can contribute to the enterprise. But many of the most rigorous tools were developed years ago. Today’s challenge is how to move from using old tools that are focused on solving problems of the past to developing new and rigorous tools that are relevant to the challenges of today and the future. We need both rigor — using scientifically valid methods to address marketing problems — and relevance — a true focus on the evolving needs of managers and their organizations.

At this point in the development of marketing, we have a difficult choice. We can choose rigorous tools that are less and less relevant to the challenges at hand. Or we can choose more relevant approaches that lack rigor. We have lost the focus on the dual objectives of rigor and relevance. Academics focus on rigor with limited attention to relevance, while practitioners focus on relevance with limited attention to rigor. This is not an acceptable situation. We need both rigor and relevance. But to achieve this we may need to rethink and transform the field of marketing.
Increasing Rigor and Relevance: Seven Strategies

I propose seven strategies that can increase both the rigor and relevance of marketing research and practice. These strategies will raise marketing’s usefulness and impact on the organization while sustaining its rigor and achieving the desired outcome for all its stakeholders. While some of these strategies have been discussed before, they all make important contributions to increasing rigor and relevance and have to be considered together.


By Yoram (Jerry) Wind

The discipline of marketing hasn’t kept up with the rapid changes facing 21st-century businesses. New scholarship doesn’t have enough management relevance, and practicing marketers are too often forsaking rigor. Here are seven strategies that can make marketing both relevant and rigorous in today’s world.

The world in which marketing operates has fundamentally changed. Thomas Friedman has sketched the outline of the new realities of our “flat world” and Kenichi Ohmae has discussed the requirements of operating on “the new global stage.”1 The rise of China, India and other emerging economies has demanded new market strategies to reach developing countries. Technologies from the Internet to biotechnology are fundamentally changing science and society. At the same time, social concerns from environmental impact to corporate social responsibility are changing the relationships of companies to the societies in which they operate. Leer más “A Plan to Invent the Marketing We Need Today”

Data on Demand Is an Opportunity

The real-time Web is a bit of a chaotic mess.

Each minute, hundreds, if not thousands, of tweets, links, likes, status updates and their ilk stampede through our collective feeds.

Of course, that isn’t to say there isn’t valuable and timely information embedded in that deluge – if you’re lucky to catch it. The constant churn makes it challenging to store and sift through the bits and pieces of information worth remembering.

Is there a better way to harness it?

If so, Brian Ascher, a partner at Venrock, a noted venture capital firm in Palo Alto, Calif., wants to invest in it.

“The whole point of social media is that we trust our friends, our network for answers to questions, recommendations, information needs,” he said. “Social media can contain the answer. There is value in all the stuff being shared, if you can find it.”

In short, he said, the key concept is data on demand:

“I think its going to be more appealing to a mass audience wondering why do I care where you check-in or what you’re doing. It might yield the answer to a question you have about where to go three months from now.”


Image representing Venrock as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

By JENNA WORTHAM

The real-time Web is a bit of a chaotic mess.

Each minute, hundreds, if not thousands, of tweets, links, likes, status updates and their ilk stampede through our collective feeds.

Of course, that isn’t to say there isn’t valuable and timely information embedded in that deluge – if you’re lucky to catch it. The constant churn makes it challenging to store and sift through the bits and pieces of information worth remembering.

Is there a better way to harness it?

If so, Brian Ascher, a partner at Venrock, a noted venture capital firm in Palo Alto, Calif., wants to invest in it.

“The whole point of social media is that we trust our friends, our network for answers to questions, recommendations, information needs,” he said. “Social media can contain the answer. There is value in all the stuff being shared, if you can find it.”

In short, he said, the key concept is data on demand:

“I think its going to be more appealing to a mass audience wondering why do I care where you check-in or what you’re doing. It might yield the answer to a question you have about where to go three months from now.” Leer más “Data on Demand Is an Opportunity”

“As Seen on TV” and Building Trust

Author Alex
Between the Shake Weight, the rise of the Fashion Print Snuggie, and the deceased but, eerily still active Billy Mays, it occurs to me that we may be witnessing somewhat of an “As Seen on TV” renaissance.

And while “As Seen on TV” products have always been the red-headed step child of legitimate consumer brands, this new golden era of cheesy, direct-response marketing makes me wonder if the simple act of seeing a brand on TV still carries the same legitimizing weight it once did.

More to the point: is seeing a brand on TV still an effective way to build trust and drive purchase intent in 2010?

The answer, I think, is that while advertising on TV certainly can be effective at driving some key metrics, the notion of brand trust and “As Seen on TV” ain’t what it used to be. There are (at least) three reasons why:


Author Alex
Between the Shake Weight, the rise of the Fashion Print Snuggie, and the deceased but, eerily still active Billy Mays, it occurs to me that we may be witnessing somewhat of an “As Seen on TV” renaissance.

And while “As Seen on TV” products have always been the red-headed step child of legitimate consumer brands, this new golden era of cheesy, direct-response marketing makes me wonder if the simple act of seeing a brand on TV still carries the same legitimizing weight it once did.

More to the point: is seeing a brand on TV still an effective way to build trust and drive purchase intent in 2010?

The answer, I think, is that while advertising on TV certainly can be effective at driving some key metrics, the notion of brand trust and “As Seen on TV” ain’t what it used to be. There are (at least) three reasons why: Leer más ““As Seen on TV” and Building Trust”

Tune In, Check In, Tune Out

A tweet from Sunday night: “@ johnmccrea oh come on, will all these apps merge already?! 🙂 and yes, giving it a try now.” It was a long day of checking in, and I was reaching my breaking point.

At the time, I was online checking out Comedy Central’s roast of David Hasselhoff. I heard there was some badge for it on Philo, one of a genre of entertainment check-in apps proliferating so rapidly that they bear a resemblance to the spread of cholera bacteria I’m reading about in the book “Ghost Map.” I checked in on Philo only to have my friend Somrat Niyogi of Bazaar Labs telling me his app Miso offered a Hasselhoff badge, which I duly earned. By the time John told me about Tunerfish, I was ready to check out. My mobile Internet connection went on the fritz or I would have had to visit TV.com’s Relay site too.


Originally published in MediaPost’s Social Media Insider

A tweet from Sunday night: “@ johnmccrea oh come on, will all these apps merge already?! 🙂 and yes, giving it a try now.” It was a long day of checking in, and I was reaching my breaking point.

At the time, I was online checking out Comedy Central’s roast of David Hasselhoff. I heard there was some badge for it on Philo, one of a genre of entertainment check-in apps proliferating so rapidly that they bear a resemblance to the spread of cholera bacteria I’m reading about in the book “Ghost Map.” I checked in on Philo only to have my friend Somrat Niyogi of Bazaar Labs telling me his app Miso offered a Hasselhoff badge, which I duly earned. By the time John told me about Tunerfish, I was ready to check out. My mobile Internet connection went on the fritz or I would have had to visit TV.com’s Relay site too. Leer más “Tune In, Check In, Tune Out”

What Every Photographer Needs to Know about Social Media

by Guest Contributor

An introduction to social media for photographers by Australian Freelance Photographer Gemma Carr (@GemTweetAlot).
How critical is social media/marketing to your photography business?

Photographers are busy people. So too are our clients. More so than ever before we have an abundance of information available to us at the click of a mouse. It’s always evolving; full of opportunity and at times, a little overwhelming.

social media photographers

As you can see, the modern day photographer is a busy one indeed. Running a successful photography business has always been about much more than just taking great photos.

As shown in the diagram above, the skills we need as a photographer in 2010 are much more diverse. The list could go on, but, I think you will see the most notable change in skills is the web?based tools such as website/Blogs/Facebook/Twitter.

And with all the new ways to promote your business the range of options is both exciting and challenging. Wouldn’t you agree?


An introduction to social media for photographers by Australian Freelance Photographer Gemma Carr (@GemTweetAlot).

How critical is social media/marketing to your photography business?

Photographers are busy people. So too are our clients. More so than ever before we have an abundance of information available to us at the click of a mouse. It’s always evolving; full of opportunity and at times, a little overwhelming.

social media photographers

As you can see, the modern day photographer is a busy one indeed. Running a successful photography business has always been about much more than just taking great photos.

As shown in the diagram above, the skills we need as a photographer in 2010 are much more diverse. The list could go on, but, I think you will see the most notable change in skills is the web?based tools such as website/Blogs/Facebook/Twitter.

And with all the new ways to promote your business the range of options is both exciting and challenging. Wouldn’t you agree? Leer más “What Every Photographer Needs to Know about Social Media”