Welcome to the Future of Advertising Insight Center // Thnx HBR Blog Network // @HarvardBiz



This HBR Insight Center on the future of advertising
 will explore the transformation. We’ll dig into the technologies that are reinventing how companies connect with customers, and look at how big data and new analytic tools are allowing advertisers to fine tune and microtarget their messaging in real time. Our bloggers will also examine the new breed of consumer that, increasingly, rejects interruptive messages and demands that advertising present itself only when invited — and then only if the message offers value. And we’ll look at consumers’ growing involvement in advertising, both as arbiters and creative collaborators. This exploration happens in tandem with our spotlight on advertising in the March issue of HBR.

by Gardiner Morse | blogs.hbr.org
Leer más “Welcome to the Future of Advertising Insight Center // Thnx HBR Blog Network // @HarvardBiz”

Biggest brands: Top 100 online advertisers 2010

As many advertisers were forced to cut back last year, so media owners probably comforted themselves with the thought that no part of the industry was immune to the effects of the UK’s deepest recession since the 30s.

However, the latest research shows that digital media have, to some degree, managed to ride the storm. According to Nielsen, overall internet adspend rose from £461.4bn in 2008 to £506.3bn in 2009 – a 9.7% year-on-year increase. While half of the UK’s top 100 online advertisers cut their media spend in 2009, more than 80% of them increased their internet investment; many of them attracted by the prospect of solid ROI at a time when they were striving to cut marketing costs.

See Table (Ranking)

(…)

More for less

Regardless of the effects of the recession, there appears to be a growing belief among brands that increasing adspend does not guarantee marketing success. By its own reckoning, Moneysupermarket.com, the 10th-placed online advertiser in the list, spent 22% less on its marketing last year, including search, but was still able to attract 14% more customers.

‘For us, it has become less about how much you spend and more about what you say and how you say it,’ says Ian Williams, the brand’s director of communications.

In a handful of sectors there was a sharp reduction in internet adspend. While they continue to make extensive use of the channel, media/entertainment brands collectively cut their budgets for online marketing by almost 16%.

Other sectors where big falls occurred include retail, which spent 42.3% less, and the property and pharmaceutical sectors, which made reductions of 45.5% and 55.2% respectively. However, while property and pharmaceuticals cut their marketing across the board last year, retailers raised their budgets overall; this suggests that online price deflation has enabled advertisers in this sector to make significant savings.


Brand Republic: Connecting advertising, marketing, media & PR

Adam Woods | //brandrepublic.com

While the recession cut a swathe through above-the-line media channels, digital marketing grasped the opportunity to prove itself, writes Adam Woods.

O2 top digital advertiser increased internet marketing expenditure by 22.8% year on yearO2 top digital advertiser increased internet marketing expenditure by 22.8% year on year

As many advertisers were forced to cut back last year, so media owners probably comforted themselves with the thought that no part of the industry was immune to the effects of the UK’s deepest recession since the 30s.

However, the latest research shows that digital media have, to some degree, managed to ride the storm. According to Nielsen, overall internet adspend rose from £461.4bn in 2008 to £506.3bn in 2009 – a 9.7% year-on-year increase. While half of the UK’s top 100 online advertisers cut their media spend in 2009, more than 80% of them increased their internet investment; many of them attracted by the prospect of solid ROI at a time when they were striving to cut marketing costs.

See Table (Ranking)

(…)

More for less

Regardless of the effects of the recession, there appears to be a growing belief among brands that increasing adspend does not guarantee marketing success. By its own reckoning, Moneysupermarket.com, the 10th-placed online advertiser in the list, spent 22% less on its marketing last year, including search, but was still able to attract 14% more customers.

‘For us, it has become less about how much you spend and more about what you say and how you say it,’ says Ian Williams, the brand’s director of communications.

In a handful of sectors there was a sharp reduction in internet adspend. While they continue to make extensive use of the channel, media/entertainment brands collectively cut their budgets for online marketing by almost 16%.

Other sectors where big falls occurred include retail, which spent 42.3% less, and the property and pharmaceutical sectors, which made reductions of 45.5% and 55.2% respectively. However, while property and pharmaceuticals cut their marketing across the board last year, retailers raised their budgets overall; this suggests that online price deflation has enabled advertisers in this sector to make significant savings. Leer más “Biggest brands: Top 100 online advertisers 2010”

Martin Sorrell: “Los contenidos de pago son esenciales”

El consejero delegado de WPP, Martin Sorrell, cree que los contenidos de pago son “esenciales” para el mantenimiento de los periódicos y los publicistas en la era digital.

Sorrell declaró a Media Week: “Pensamos que los contenidos de pago son esenciales porque creemos que ofrecer contenido gratuito, especialmente si los consumidores lo valoran, no tiene sentido”. Con mayor rotundidad afirma que los consumidores “tienen que pagar por el contenido que valoran”.


El consejero delegado de  WPP, Martin Sorrell, cree que los contenidos de pago son “esenciales” para el mantenimiento de los periódicos y los publicistas en la era digital.

Sorrell declaró a Media Week: “Pensamos que los contenidos de pago son esenciales porque creemos que ofrecer contenido gratuito, especialmente si los consumidores lo valoran, no tiene sentido”. Con mayor rotundidad afirma que los consumidores “tienen que pagar por el contenido que valoran”. Leer más “Martin Sorrell: “Los contenidos de pago son esenciales””

In A ‘Luvvy’ Recovery, Digital Hits 28 Percent Of WPP Sales

Earlier this year, the world’s biggest advertising group said new media would make up two thirds of its income in three or four years.

Today it stands at 28 percent, WPP said, as it reported first-half-of-year pre-tax profit up 36 percent to £244 ($379.46) million, on three percent better revenue of £4.44 ($6.91) billion.

CEO Sir Martin Sorrell, over the last year, has cautiously refrained from embracing a 2010/11 upturn away from the recession.

But the latest WPP earnings statement does dare to say: “The results reflect the recovery in the world economy … “The group’s advertising businesses achieved a 180 degree turnaround from -4% in the first quarter to +4% in the second quarter … Traditional advertising has recovered sharply.”

“The expected LUV recovery – L-shaped in Western Europe, U-shaped in the United States and V-shaped in the BRICs and Next 11 – is now more LVV-shaped (LuVVy-shaped?), with the United States, in particular recovering much more strongly than anticipated.”


DAVOS/SWITZERLAND, 27JAN07 - Sir Martin Sorrel...
Image via Wikipedia

Earlier this year, the world’s biggest advertising group said new media would make up two thirds of its income in three or four years.

Today it stands at 28 percent, WPP said, as it reported first-half-of-year pre-tax profit up 36 percent to £244 ($379.46) million, on three percent better revenue of £4.44 ($6.91) billion.

CEO Sir Martin Sorrell, over the last year, has cautiously refrained from embracing a 2010/11 upturn away from the recession.

But the latest WPP earnings statement does dare to say: “The results reflect the recovery in the world economy … “The group’s advertising businesses achieved a 180 degree turnaround from -4% in the first quarter to +4% in the second quarter … Traditional advertising has recovered sharply.”

“The expected LUV recovery – L-shaped in Western Europe, U-shaped in the United States and V-shaped in the BRICs and Next 11 – is now more LVV-shaped (LuVVy-shaped?), with the United States, in particular recovering much more strongly than anticipated.” Leer más “In A ‘Luvvy’ Recovery, Digital Hits 28 Percent Of WPP Sales”