Plugging into the Future of Humanity: Exploring the Human API – thxz @briansolis


The Internet of Things is bigger than we may realize.
http://www.briansolis.com

We are experiencing a shift from a world of inanimate objects and reactive devices to a world where data, intelligence, and computing are distributed, ubiquitous, and networked. My fellow analysts and I at Altimeter Group refer to the Internet of Things (IoT) as the Sentient World. It’s the idea that inanimate objects gain the ability to perceive things, perform tasks, adapt, or help you adapt over time. And, it’s the future of the Internet and consumer electronics.

In 2008, the number of things connected to the Internet exceeded the number of people on earth. By 2020, it’s expected that there will be 50 billion things connected.

A network of things creates an incredible information ecosystem that connects the online and physical world through a series of transactions. In a world where data becomes a natural bi-product of these exchanges, developers, businesses, and users alike are faced with the reality that data isn’t only big, its volume and benefits are also overwhelming.

Did you know that the world creates 2.5 quintillion bytes of new data every day? According to IBM, 90% of the data in the world today has been created in the last two years alone.

Considering the relationship between the Internet, data, and devices, I can’t help but think about Marshall McLuhan’s ominous words, “The more data banks record about each one of us, the less we exist.”

FUL ARTICLE 🙂

With the Internet of Things, that data takes residence in the cloud with various devices and apps siphoning and funneling information in and out, requiring an incredible amount of vision and architecture to organize, analyze, and present it in a way that makes sense while also offering insight and utility. Instead of eclipsing our individuality, I believe the future may reveal the exact opposite. There’s a sense of empowerment and personalization that emerges and, along the way, we subconsciously and consciously begin to crave it. We become insatiable in our pursuit of personalized feedback and it may, in fact, define us.

The Convergence of Devices, Data and the Net

We’re starting to realize the magic of the IoT today in some of the most basic aspects of our lives. While at Le Web, the audience was introduced to Lockitron, a clever system that combines a mobile app, a household device that mounts to existing door locks, and the Internet to open and close doors remotely. I immediately thought of a partnership with Airbnb to give renters peace of mind in controlling their rentals.

Nest is disrupting the long dormant world of thermostats by connecting mobile devices to existing thermostats (heating/air conditioning) with the simplicity and elegance of an iPod. But it’s more than controlling energy and temperatures remotely, Nest learns and begins to adapt without input.

Square’s Jack Dorsey has disrupted the age old world of payment systems by transforming mobile devices into cash registers, connecting money, data, and the net into one frictionless transaction. It’s the data part that represents something so much more however. In that regard, Dorsey sees the real value beyond the transaction—where the swipe and the receipt ultimately become a communication medium. In his view, payments represent “a necessary transaction” to create a channel where merchants learn more about individual consumers and equally, consumers learn more about their behavior.

The Convergence of People, Devices, Data and the Net

When I marvel at the future of the Internet of Things, I can’t help but think about another often shared idea from McLuhan that, “the medium is the message.”

There’s more to smart appliances and devices than utility or remotely controlling our surroundings. The underlying current of this powerful information exchange are the experiences that surround and emanate from each transaction.

What if the medium wasn’t just the device, the medium was us?

FUL ARTICLE 🙂

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El sistema se sostiene con la Generación de EXPERTOS, que muchas veces nos dejan idiotas…


Porqué escribir un libro donde te enseño los 897 pasos para ser rico?, quizás porque el primero de ellos, sea Compra éste Libro?/ @gabrielcatalano , en estado de crítico!

El sistema se sostiene con la Generación de EXPERTOS, que muchas veces nos dejan idiotas… carentes de análisis.

No leas, no quiero… es una necesidad de expresión personal!, y seguro no estarás de acuerdo. XQ ni yo lo estoy!. El sistema se sostiene con la Generación de EXPERTOS, que muchas veces nos dejan idiotas.

No no, sí realmente lo soy. Para ello estudié y sigo haciéndolo.
En qué me convierto una vez trasnochado?, en un idiota…?

GNx – ON “E” 

Tantos… gurúes, blogs, foros y en todo tipo de redes.
Hablando sobre engagement, atracción de tráfico, consumo, haciendo futurismo sobre próximos lanzamientos. Casi brujos todos los años predicen las tendencias, que en realidad, todos re publicamos, comentamos, compramos y asentimos…

Es tal vez qué hemos olvidado aprender a escuchar a quienes debemos. A quiénes nos hablan. Y a quiénes piden exactamente lo que quieren.

Además: Los cambios constantes, permiten la generación de EXPERTOS?

La base es la misma: Maslow, Marshall, Freud, Ogilvy… más techie, más hype…, more search!, more issues? Ya lo han dicho y predecido… (hasta la irrupción de The Matrix, conceptulamente por WachoBRO)…

Éstos son… aquí están!
Leer más “El sistema se sostiene con la Generación de EXPERTOS, que muchas veces nos dejan idiotas…”

Why User Experience Is Critical To Customer Relationships

Some of the biggest trends today–mobile, geoloco, social, real-time–are changing how consumers discover and share information and connect with one another. Technology aside, consumers are driving the rapid adoption of technology because of the capabilities that are unlocked through each device. From self-expression and validation to communication and connections to knowledge and collaboration, new opportunities unfold with each new device and platform.

As smart and connected technology matures beyond a luxury into everyday commodities, consumer expectations only inflate. As a result, functionality, connectedness, and experiences emerge as the lures for attention. For brands to compete for attention now takes something greater than mere presences in the right channels or support for the most popular devices. User experience (UX) is now becoming a critical point in customer engagement in order to compete for attention now and in the future. For without thoughtful UX, consumers meander without direction, reward, or utility. And their attention, and ultimately loyalty, follows.

The CrUX of Engagement Is Intention and Purpose

Brands as a whole suffer from medium-alism, where inordinate value and weight is placed on the technology of any medium rather than amplifying platform strengths and ideas to deliver desired and beneficial experiences and outcomes. Said another way, businesses are designing for the sake of designing, without regard for how someone feels, thinks, or acts as a result.

Thankfully, there’s a cure for medium-alism. UX is the new Rx for most new media deployments. From social networks to mobile apps to commerce to digital, experiential strategies form the bridge where intentions meet outcomes. By starting with the end in mind, UX packages efficiency and enchantment to deliver more meaningful, engaging, and rewarding consumer journeys.

It’s easier said than done, however.

UX is an art and science, and it is all but ignored in the development of new media channels where customers control their own fate. If the appeal of an app diminishes, it’s removed from the device. If a brand page in a social or mobile network no longer delivers value, a customer can effortlessly unlike, unfollow, or unsubscribe. If the rewards for taking action on behalf of a brand–think check-in, QR, barcode scans, or augmented reality plays–are intangible, or gimmicky without intent, customers will simply power off. And, if a consumer cannot take action in your favor, within their channel of relevance, with ease and elegance, value or ROI will forever escape your grasp.


BY FC EXPERT BLOGGER BRIAN SOLIS | http://www.fastcompany.comUser experience is a priority that should, in some way, find a home within the design of any new-media strategy.

This is part one of a limited series on the need for brands to employ UX in new-media strategies to improve customer experiences and engagement.

With the explosion of social media and smart devices, customers are becoming incredibly sophisticated, elusive, and empowered. As a result, the dynamics that govern the relationship between brands and customers is evolving.

But even in this era of engagement and “two-way” conversations, the reality is that the relationship businesses hope to have with customers through these new devices, applications, or networks and their true state are not one in the same. In fact, it is woefully one-sided, and usually not to the advantage of customers, which for all intents and purposes still affects businesses.

Rather than examine the role new technologies and platforms can play in improving customer relationships and experiences, many businesses invest in “attendance” strategies where a brand is present in both trendy and established channels, but not defining meaningful experiences or outcomes. Simply stated, businesses are underestimating the significance of customer experiences. Leer más “Why User Experience Is Critical To Customer Relationships”

Prosumidores, de Marshall McLuhan al Mini Cooper

En la economía del conocimiento, las fronteras en producción y consumo se disuelven. Así nacen los prosumidores, agentes económicos que hacen un aporte a la producción de los bienes y servicios que compran. Los casos Amazon, Linux y BMW…

Por Juan María Segura

En 1972, McLuhan y Nevitt advirtieron que, con la tecnología electrónica, el individuo podría llegar a actuar simultáneamente como consumidor y productor. Alvin Toffler también se refirió a esta tendencia en su celebrado libro “La Tercera Ola”.

Más recientemente Don Tapscott, tal vez uno de los mayores pensadores del tema aún en actividad, acuñó en 1995 el concepto de “prosumo” (prosumption) en su obra “La Economía Digital”, la primera de una saga dedicada al tema.

El término “prosumidor” (prosumer) se deriva de la fusión de dos palabras: productor (producer) y consumidor (consumer).


En la economía del conocimiento, las fronteras en producción y consumo se disuelven. Así nacen los prosumidores, agentes económicos que hacen un aporte a la producción de los bienes y servicios que compran. Los casos Amazon, Linux y BMW
Por Juan María Segura

En 1972, McLuhan y Nevitt advirtieron que, con la tecnología electrónica, el individuo podría llegar a actuar simultáneamente como consumidor y productor. Alvin Toffler también se refirió a esta tendencia en su celebrado libro “La Tercera Ola“. 

Más recientemente Don Tapscott, tal vez uno de los mayores pensadores del tema aún en actividad, acuñó en 1995 el concepto de “prosumo” (prosumption) en su obra “La Economía Digital”, la primera de una saga dedicada al tema.

El término “prosumidor” (prosumer) se deriva de la fusión de dos palabras: productor (producer) y consumidor (consumer).
Leer más “Prosumidores, de Marshall McLuhan al Mini Cooper”

OnInnovation : Visionaries thinking out loud™

Low Tech Tools to Foster High Output Innovation Thinking

One of the questions often asked by those seeking to create a strong innovation culture is, “What are some good tools for engaging people across my organization?” Well the consultant in me would usually hedge his bets and would offer the universal response, “It depends.” But that is as singularly unsatisfying to say as it is to hear, so I mostly take a multiple alternative approach in the hopes of landing close to the targeted need. The first place I usually start is with some of the very lowest of low tech: playing cards, or their trading card equivalent. Why? Because they are fast, fun, revealing, and energizing in a way that is distinct from other more formal tools.

The idea of using playing cards in unique ways is not anything new. Did you know that there aren’t only four suites of playing cards? We all know the usual suspects of Hearts, Diamonds, Spades and Clubs. There are also fifth suit variants that introduced an additional suit. Depending the time, location and game being played these suits might have been, Royales, Eagles, Stars, Pentagons, Quotations, or even Aether. Some modified decks have additional face cards and additional numbered cards, too. In the United States of America, in 1895, a gentleman by the name of Hiram Jones created a deck called “International Playing Cards” and it had two additional suits, a red suit with crosses and a black suit of bullets. Innovation in playing cards has a long and storied history.

The interest expressed by many clients is focused on how to use standard cards in a unique manner. Marshall McLuhan, the noted advertising guru of the 20th Century used a standard set of four-suit playing cards as the basis for his creative thought starter set, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Card Deck. The namesake Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line was an integrated chain of some 63 radar and communication stations, stretching across Arctic Canada at approximately the 69th parallel designed to provide advance warning of imminent air attack to Canada and the United States. The DEW Line was considered a perfect metaphor by McLuhan on the role of art and the artist at a time of rapid social and technological change and he repeated the idea frequently.

To the blind all things are sudden. -Quote on the Jack of Diamonds in Marshall McLuhan’s Distant Early Warning (DEW) Card Deck


Playing with a Full Deck

Posted by DrewMarshall on July 30, 2010

Low Tech Tools to Foster High Output Innovation Thinking
One of the questions often asked by those seeking to create a strong innovation culture is, “What are some good tools for engaging people across my organization?” Well the consultant in me would usually hedge his bets and would offer the universal response, “It depends.” But that […]

Low Tech Tools to Foster High Output Innovation Thinking

One of the questions often asked by those seeking to create a strong innovation culture is, “What are some good tools for engaging people across my organization?” Well the consultant in me would usually hedge his bets and would offer the universal response, “It depends.” But that is as singularly unsatisfying to say as it is to hear, so I mostly take a multiple alternative approach in the hopes of landing close to the targeted need. The first place I usually start is with some of the very lowest of low tech: playing cards, or their trading card equivalent. Why? Because they are fast, fun, revealing, and energizing in a way that is distinct from other more formal tools.

The idea of using playing cards in unique ways is not anything new. Did you know that there aren’t only four suites of playing cards? We all know the usual suspects of Hearts, Diamonds, Spades and Clubs. There are also fifth suit variants that introduced an additional suit. Depending the time, location and game being played these suits might have been, Royales, Eagles, Stars, Pentagons, Quotations, or even Aether. Some modified decks have additional face cards and additional numbered cards, too. In the United States of America, in 1895, a gentleman by the name of Hiram Jones created a deck called “International Playing Cards” and it had two additional suits, a red suit with crosses and a black suit of bullets. Innovation in playing cards has a long and storied history.

The interest expressed by many clients is focused on how to use standard cards in a unique manner. Marshall McLuhan, the noted advertising guru of the 20th Century used a standard set of four-suit playing cards as the basis for his creative thought starter set, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Card Deck. The namesake Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line was an integrated chain of some 63 radar and communication stations, stretching across Arctic Canada at approximately the 69th parallel designed to provide advance warning of imminent air attack to Canada and the United States. The DEW Line was considered a perfect metaphor by McLuhan on the role of art and the artist at a time of rapid social and technological change and he repeated the idea frequently.

To the blind all things are sudden. -Quote on the Jack of Diamonds in Marshall McLuhan’s Distant Early Warning (DEW) Card Deck Leer más “OnInnovation : Visionaries thinking out loud™”