Talk to Strangers – and Listen

The whole process traversed four stages that make recommendations effective: discovery, validation, confirmation, and actualization. We’ll look at all four, specifically in how they’re used in mobile situations.

1) Discovery: Recommendations need to be readily accessible. Right now, more technologically savvy consumers can find location-based recommendations easily through check-in services, Twitter, barcode scanning, and other means. To gain wider adoption, they’ll have to gain even wider distribution, especially through default mapping and local search offerings on both feature phones and smartphones.

2) Relevance: The recommendations need to resonate in some way with their audience. At Birch & Barley, there were more recommendations for the Brussels sprouts than brunch, but I quickly ignored them and forgot about the vegetables. Food’s a salient example, but this could relate to anything. When I shop at J. Crew, it won’t help if I only see mentions of women’s clothing. When I’m at a hotel, I’ll care more about the WiFi than the spa. Venues and location-based marketers will need to know their audience.


Originally published in MediaPost’s Social Media Insider

The whole process traversed four stages that make recommendations effective: discovery, validation, confirmation, and actualization. We’ll look at all four, specifically in how they’re used in mobile situations.

1) Discovery: Recommendations need to be readily accessible. Right now, more technologically savvy consumers can find location-based recommendations easily through check-in services, Twitter, barcode scanning, and other means. To gain wider adoption, they’ll have to gain even wider distribution, especially through default mapping and local search offerings on both feature phones and smartphones.

2) Relevance: The recommendations need to resonate in some way with their audience. At Birch & Barley, there were more recommendations for the Brussels sprouts than brunch, but I quickly ignored them and forgot about the vegetables. Food’s a salient example, but this could relate to anything. When I shop at J. Crew, it won’t help if I only see mentions of women’s clothing. When I’m at a hotel, I’ll care more about the WiFi than the spa. Venues and location-based marketers will need to know their audience.

3) Validation: Consumers must make sure there’s some credible reason to listen to the recommendation. If there’s one reviewer saying something that strikes a deeply personal chord, it may not matter at all who that reviewer is. In my case, there could be one tourist from Kazakhstan raving about fried chicken, and I’m fine taking a chance. Most of the time, other cues are needed. These factors include: quantity — the sheer number of recommendations listed; convergence — several reviews echoing similar notes; and proximity — how closely you identify with the reviewers. Leer más “Talk to Strangers – and Listen”

Social Media Insider: CheckPoints Makes An End-Run Around Location

Consider ShopKick, for example. In a recent Q&A on MediaPost, I was willing to peg Shopkick as the most overhyped mobile technology. As Shopkick has been the subject of stories in major media outlets from here to Botswana, it’s easy to call it overhyped. The gist of the app is that you earn points by walking into select stores, which the app confirms by using the microphone to pick up an inaudible audio tone played by a speaker placed near a retailer’s entrance. More points, dubbed “kickbucks,” kick in when users take specific actions within the store such as scanning select products. Location is central to the app. The kickbucks only matter so much here, as I’ve made it to level six with over 400 kickbucks (in other words, I’ve used this app a lot) and still haven’t earned a $2 Best Buy gift card. The app is still very new and can play a role in having consumers engage with locations and products, but it’s not fully baked yet. [Más…]

Yesterday, a new location-centric application called CheckPoints was announced that’s designed to shift the framework of the experience. Instead of focusing on locations, CheckPoints works with brands, including launch partners Belkin, Energizer, Seventh Generation, and Tyson Foods. While users can check in at various shopping locations, the focus is on the apps’ featured products. Scanning those products unlocks custom content and rewards. Here, the rewards are designed to be more tangible so it doesn’t take too long to understand the benefits. Rewards can include airline miles and other offers not necessarily related to the items scanned.

Brands will be rooting for this app to work. I work with a number of consumer packaged goods brands, and I’m sure this will come up in conversation with several of them. If this app starts influencing users’ purchase decisions, especially in ways brands can readily track, then brands will promote the app themselves. In essence, it will mark a transition of slotting fees to scanning fees. It’s also worth noting that despite the differences between CheckPoints and Shopkick today, Shopkick can just as easily be used to promote products across a wide range of locations.

The limitations of product-scanning apps are numerous, and they’re worth keeping in mind. The technological hurdles will be overcome within several years, but consumer behavior may not change as fast.


//www.marketersstudio.com | by David Berkowitz, Senior Director of Emerging Media & Innovation for agency 360i.


Today’s column, which originally ran in MediaPost

Checkpoints1

I’ve got a riddle for you: What’s the hardest part about location-based marketing? Here’s a hint: It’s not the marketing.

The challenge tends to lie in dealing with locations. This comes up all the time. Can locations accept mobile coupons? Does a brand have the right to run marketing around locations they don’t own? For locations that are part of a chain, is the marketing the responsibility of the store owner or the corporate marketing group? While locations now offer compelling digital marketing opportunities thanks to advances in mobile media and devices, locations also cause a few wrinkles in some otherwise solid marketing plans.

Consider ShopKick, for example. In a recent Q&A on MediaPost, I was willing to peg Shopkick as the most overhyped mobile technology. As Shopkick has been the subject of stories in major media outlets from here to Botswana, it’s easy to call it overhyped. The gist of the app is that you earn points by walking into select stores, which the app confirms by using the microphone to pick up an inaudible audio tone played by a speaker placed near a retailer‘s entrance. More points, dubbed “kickbucks,” kick in when users take specific actions within the store such as scanning select products. Location is central to the app. The kickbucks only matter so much here, as I’ve made it to level six with over 400 kickbucks (in other words, I’ve used this app a lot) and still haven’t earned a $2 Best Buy gift card. The app is still very new and can play a role in having consumers engage with locations and products, but it’s not fully baked yet. Leer más “Social Media Insider: CheckPoints Makes An End-Run Around Location”

A Reason to Care about Social Media

For those running communities, whether as a marketer, technology vendor, or any kind of community manager, the biggest lesson you can learn from CarePages is to make it as easy as possible for the target users to do what they’re supposed to do. In this case, it’s about sharing text updates, posting photos, and responding to posts. Personally, I’d love to see other features, like the ability for organizers to send updates via text messaging or custom apps, and easy ways for visitors to send virtual and physical gifts. I’m quickly getting into columnist mode, though; I don’t know firsthand how much those matter to the target users of CarePages. The simplicity seems to work for Billie’s mom.

CarePages is just one way to do it. It’s also possible to run similar communities through Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, blogging platforms, forums and countless other means. That only reinforces how far we’ve come and how meaningful social media can be. The only thing more exciting for me is that we’re just getting started, and there’s so much more good we can do.


Originally published in MediaPost‘s Social Media Insider

“Her surgery is tomorrow morning and she’s not at all nervous! Please say a prayer for her and think of her tomorrow at 7:30 when surgery begins.”

This was the first entry posted on the site “Heal Fast Billie” hosted on CarePages through the hospital where a preteen I know just had surgery. CarePages offers these private blogs either directly or through more than 625 North American healthcare facilities. I’d heard of it before, but it was hard to fully appreciate until I had a personal connection. For the past week, I’ve been glued to Billie’s site, checking updates almost as frequently as I’ve accessed Facebook. (Note that names of friends and family are changed here to protect their privacy.)

“We just met with the doctor who seemed really really pleased with everything. They are ‘closing her up’ now.” — Sept. 2, 2:41 p.m.

As I write this, the community for Billie has attracted 61 visitors and 104 public comments. Her mom publishes updates several times daily. I don’t get to see Billie and her parents that often, so without this I’d have probably heard the result of the surgery but little more. Now, while she lives several states away from me, I have this ongoing connection, and with all the positive news I’ve come to look forward to the results.

“I’m sure there’s a more tech-savvy way to do this… but I just took pictures of Billie’s x-rays and posted them to the Photo Gallery. The contrast in pre/post op images is remarkable. As I said earlier, Billie was especially happy when she saw these x-rays, even in her very groggy, post op state. All really great.” — Sept. 3, 3:47 p.m. Leer más “A Reason to Care about Social Media”

Foursquare, I Can’t Quit You

Hey, Foursquare, a social network with about 250 times as many users as yours just incorporated your core functionality and even co-opted the term “check-in” that you’ve been trying to trademark. Is it time to move on?

Not so fast. Foursquare founder Dennis Crowley tweeted a few days ago, “Call from my 86 yr old grandma: ‘Hello. I want to know if this Face-Book is like yours. It sounds like Four-Squared, but without the fun.'” Grandma Crowley, apocryphal as she may be, speaks the truth. Foursquare is still more fun, and probably always will be compared to Facebook Places. That means a lot, for now.

When Facebook Places launched, I first checked in at my agency 360i’s office and then tried it from a number of other locations in subsequent days. Most of the time, I also used a number of other location-based apps such as Foursquare, Whrrl, Gowalla, Yelp, SCVNGR, and FoodSpotting. Even if I tire of some apps over time, I’m not giving up any solely because Facebook Places is here. Here are five reasons why:

1) It’s not easy to tell on Facebook Places who’s near you. Foursquare now includes maps to plot your friends’ whereabouts, and in general it’s better at detecting who’s really nearby. Facebook’s algorithm currently places too much emphasis on how closely connected it thinks your friends are to you, but if a close friend I’ve known for half my life checks into somewhere in Iowa, that won’t matter to me when I’m in New York.

2) Foursquare’s tips are pretty useful. Yes, there’s a lot of blather, but when I checked in at the White Plains, N.Y. train station on Friday and saw all the tips urging people to avoid the men’s room, I don’t care if I have the Seinfeldian syndrome known as uromysitisis — I’m finding a different place to go. Whrrl is even more focused on recommendations, and FoodSpotting has directed me to some delectable dishes. Facebook will need great content.


IMG_0097 Here’s today’s column, originally published in MediaPost’s Social Media Insider

Hey, Foursquare, a social network with about 250 times as many users as yours just incorporated your core functionality and even co-opted the term “check-in” that you’ve been trying to trademark. Is it time to move on?

Not so fast. Foursquare founder Dennis Crowley tweeted a few days ago, “Call from my 86 yr old grandma: ‘Hello. I want to know if this Face-Book is like yours. It sounds like Four-Squared, but without the fun.'” Grandma Crowley, apocryphal as she may be, speaks the truth. Foursquare is still more fun, and probably always will be compared to Facebook Places. That means a lot, for now.

When Facebook Places launched, I first checked in at my agency 360i’s office and then tried it from a number of other locations in subsequent days. Most of the time, I also used a number of other location-based apps such as Foursquare, Whrrl, Gowalla, Yelp, SCVNGR, and FoodSpotting. Even if I tire of some apps over time, I’m not giving up any solely because Facebook Places is here. Here are five reasons why:

1) It’s not easy to tell on Facebook Places who’s near you. Foursquare now includes maps to plot your friends’ whereabouts, and in general it’s better at detecting who’s really nearby. Facebook’s algorithm currently places too much emphasis on how closely connected it thinks your friends are to you, but if a close friend I’ve known for half my life checks into somewhere in Iowa, that won’t matter to me when I’m in New York.

2) Foursquare’s tips are pretty useful. Yes, there’s a lot of blather, but when I checked in at the White Plains, N.Y. train station on Friday and saw all the tips urging people to avoid the men’s room, I don’t care if I have the Seinfeldian syndrome known as uromysitisis — I’m finding a different place to go. Whrrl is even more focused on recommendations, and FoodSpotting has directed me to some delectable dishes. Facebook will need great content. Leer más “Foursquare, I Can’t Quit You”

Tune In, Check In, Tune Out

A tweet from Sunday night: “@ johnmccrea oh come on, will all these apps merge already?! 🙂 and yes, giving it a try now.” It was a long day of checking in, and I was reaching my breaking point.

At the time, I was online checking out Comedy Central’s roast of David Hasselhoff. I heard there was some badge for it on Philo, one of a genre of entertainment check-in apps proliferating so rapidly that they bear a resemblance to the spread of cholera bacteria I’m reading about in the book “Ghost Map.” I checked in on Philo only to have my friend Somrat Niyogi of Bazaar Labs telling me his app Miso offered a Hasselhoff badge, which I duly earned. By the time John told me about Tunerfish, I was ready to check out. My mobile Internet connection went on the fritz or I would have had to visit TV.com’s Relay site too.


Originally published in MediaPost’s Social Media Insider

A tweet from Sunday night: “@ johnmccrea oh come on, will all these apps merge already?! 🙂 and yes, giving it a try now.” It was a long day of checking in, and I was reaching my breaking point.

At the time, I was online checking out Comedy Central’s roast of David Hasselhoff. I heard there was some badge for it on Philo, one of a genre of entertainment check-in apps proliferating so rapidly that they bear a resemblance to the spread of cholera bacteria I’m reading about in the book “Ghost Map.” I checked in on Philo only to have my friend Somrat Niyogi of Bazaar Labs telling me his app Miso offered a Hasselhoff badge, which I duly earned. By the time John told me about Tunerfish, I was ready to check out. My mobile Internet connection went on the fritz or I would have had to visit TV.com’s Relay site too. Leer más “Tune In, Check In, Tune Out”

Why WOM Trumps Q&A Ahora

Guinea pigs (cuy): as cute as they are delicious, especially when friends tell you where to find the tastiest ones

The post below was originally published in MediaPost’s Social Media Insider
Why WOM Trumps Q&A Ahora

It was a strange experience working as a social marketing strategist while planning my July vacation to South America. I had especially high hopes for question and answer sites, given how much they’ve evolved since the days when it was just Yahoo Answers competing with the now-defunct Google Answers. I thought I’d write a column about the recommendations the sites provided, but then I started asking questions and the answers underwhelmed.


IMG_4018
Guinea pigs (cuy): as cute as they are delicious, especially when friends tell you where to find the tastiest ones

The post below was originally published in MediaPost’s Social Media Insider

Why WOM Trumps Q&A Ahora

It was a strange experience working as a social marketing strategist while planning my July vacation to South America. I had especially high hopes for question and answer sites, given how much they’ve evolved since the days when it was just Yahoo Answers competing with the now-defunct Google Answers. I thought I’d write a column about the recommendations the sites provided, but then I started asking questions and the answers underwhelmed. Leer más “Why WOM Trumps Q&A Ahora”

21 Social Lessons from 100+ Events

Want to know how to get invited to speak at events, get tweeted, and not come off like a jerk afterwards? I’m sure there’s a self-help book here waiting to happen, but in the meantime I’ve got just the column for you.

After a madcap June filled with conferences, I jotted down over 100 lessons that I learned from speaking at over 100 events the past few years. Many conferences have been about social media, which makes sense given that the only club membership cards I’ve ever owned have been for Social Media Club and Lego Club (the latter was when I was ten, I swear). Even for the other events, social media has played a noticeable role, especially as I started speaking right around when blogging was catching on.

Many of the lessons I’ve learned involve social media in particular. If you’re speaking at, running, or even attending events down the road, perhaps a few of these will come in handy.


Rochester AMA 2
Originally published in MediaPost’s Social Media Insider

Want to know how to get invited to speak at events, get tweeted, and not come off like a jerk afterwards? I’m sure there’s a self-help book here waiting to happen, but in the meantime I’ve got just the column for you.

After a madcap June filled with conferences, I jotted down over 100 lessons that I learned from speaking at over 100 events the past few years. Many conferences have been about social media, which makes sense given that the only club membership cards I’ve ever owned have been for Social Media Club and Lego Club (the latter was when I was ten, I swear). Even for the other events, social media has played a noticeable role, especially as I started speaking right around when blogging was catching on.

Many of the lessons I’ve learned involve social media in particular. If you’re speaking at, running, or even attending events down the road, perhaps a few of these will come in handy. Leer más “21 Social Lessons from 100+ Events”

As Slate Shows with Siemens, Contextual Ad Targeting Still Needs to be Trained

I was reading through an article on Slate analyzing Mitt Romney’s comments about a proposed U.S.-Russia nuclear arms treaty and did a double-take. It started to talk about rail-based missiles, and then went on for a bit. Right next to the article was an ad from Siemens touting the benefits of high-speed railroads. I wonder if Siemens can launch missiles off their railways? That might open up some new revenue streams from them and make these ads REALLY profitable.

See the snapshot of the placement…


I was reading through an article on Slate analyzing Mitt Romney‘s comments about a proposed U.S.-Russia nuclear arms treaty and did a double-take. It started to talk about rail-based missiles, and then went on for a bit. Right next to the article was an ad from Siemens touting the benefits of high-speed railroads. I wonder if Siemens can launch missiles off their railways? That might open up some new revenue streams from them and make these ads REALLY profitable.

See the snapshot of the placement: Leer más “As Slate Shows with Siemens, Contextual Ad Targeting Still Needs to be Trained”

Beyond Mobile Social’s F-Words

Whenever mobile social media comes up in conversation, I tend to hear a lot of f-words. Hopefully they won’t be censored here, as the ones I’m referring to are Foursquare and Facebook.

Perhaps I’m part of the problem. When I’m not writing about all the mobile check-in apps I use or what it’s like to be a Foursquare Super Mayor, I’m making overblown claims about Facebook gaining a universal following thanks to growth in its mobile user base. The f-words play important roles, but mobile social media is much bigger.

To give a sense of how much bigger it is, below you’ll find various forms of mobile social media that may be relevant when developing a marketing program. Perhaps mobile social media is part of the core idea, or it comes up specifically when assessing mobile or social media. However the plan comes together, the tools and tactics should come last, but understanding them provides a sense of what’s possible.


Whenever mobile social media comes up in conversation, I tend to hear a lot of f-words. Hopefully they won’t be censored here, as the ones I’m referring to are Foursquare and Facebook.

Perhaps I’m part of the problem. When I’m not writing about all the mobile check-in apps I use or what it’s like to be a Foursquare Super Mayor, I’m making overblown claims about Facebook gaining a universal following thanks to growth in its mobile user base. The f-words play important roles, but mobile social media is much bigger.

To give a sense of how much bigger it is, below you’ll find various forms of mobile social media that may be relevant when developing a marketing program. Perhaps mobile social media is part of the core idea, or it comes up specifically when assessing mobile or social media. However the plan comes together, the tools and tactics should come last, but understanding them provides a sense of what’s possible. Leer más “Beyond Mobile Social’s F-Words”

Google Voice Voicemail Transcription Partially Useful, Unintentionally Hilarious

One of the benefits of Google Voice is voicemail transcription. I’m particularly bad about checking voicemail so I loved having this as an option. Here is the complete text of a voicemail I received on Friday:

Hi David, show look like early evening on Friday. Hope you guys are doing well.
Wanted to catch up with you. Well, I’ll try and I know, we’re having tons getting, in reply to that
and would love to try that dosomething with you guys so wanted to see what your schedules like
the conclusion make that work, so give us a call. I’m going to make this my phone calls now
and if you have a pretty wiped out. I think wemight just try to watch a movie later or something
but but give me a try. And if you had left not getting. We directly and how that he says clear
sense of times of might work of that and let me know, otherwisewe’ll just talk to soon, okay.
Take care bye bye.


I recently gave Google Voice another shot. I was an early user that never used it much, partially because I didn’t like my phone number much.

I checked it out again and paid $10 to switch my number to something more memorable. You can even search for number strings in your preferred area code, like any numbers with 1111 in it or some memorable sequence. Leer más “Google Voice Voicemail Transcription Partially Useful, Unintentionally Hilarious”

All Mobile is Social

Is all mobile social?

Five years ago, penning a MediaPost piece that feels like it was written far more recently, I asked, “Is all mobile local?” That question would have been a more fitting title for the column rather than the wonkier one I used, “The Mobile-Local Redundancy,” which sounds like a rejected name for a Jason Bourne movie. The question and the column answering it remain relevant, making me wonder if so little has changed in sixty-one months.

A very different question probably wouldn’t have crossed my mind back then: Is all mobile social? More specifically, is all mobile media inherently shareable through digital social channels, and should that be the case?

The thought came up this week amidst successive meetings with two very different companies: InMobi, a mobile ad network, and SCVNGR, a mobile gaming platform (see a recent blog post I wrote for more on the latter). The ad network’s executives highlighted a case study for Reebok that included virtual gifting via mobile media. The whole paradigm of mobile media is quickly coming around to what it seems it was meant to be, like Jack on “Lost” having his moment of awakening and fulfilling his purpose.


Is all mobile social?

Five years ago, penning a MediaPost piece that feels like it was written far more recently, I asked, “Is all mobile local?” That question would have been a more fitting title for the column rather than the wonkier one I used, “The Mobile-Local Redundancy,” which sounds like a rejected name for a Jason Bourne movie. The question and the column answering it remain relevant, making me wonder if so little has changed in sixty-one months.

A very different question probably wouldn’t have crossed my mind back then: Is all mobile social? More specifically, is all mobile media inherently shareable through digital social channels, and should that be the case?

The thought came up this week amidst successive meetings with two very different companies: InMobi, a mobile ad network, and SCVNGR, a mobile gaming platform (see a recent blog post I wrote for more on the latter). The ad network’s executives highlighted a case study for Reebok that included virtual gifting via mobile media. The whole paradigm of mobile media is quickly coming around to what it seems it was meant to be, like Jack on “Lost” having his moment of awakening and fulfilling his purpose. Leer más “All Mobile is Social”

How do you get people to care about privacy?

From today’s MediaPost Social Media Insider

4617591602_ed2cd9ded4_b

How do you get people to care about privacy?

People care about it in offline settings. At home, you know which window shades you prefer to draw closed at which times. At work, you might discuss Saturday night’s exploits with your cubicle-mate and not with your boss. Few can tell online; I can’t. I avoid networks like blippy that share purchases based on credit card data, and I turned off Google Latitude’s option of automatically broadcasting my location from mobile devices, but I’m admittedly inconsistent and too laissez-faire with most other forms of social media.

The latest debates over Facebook’s privacy policies may not last, but there’s a lot of good coming out of the dialogue. If Facebook won’t clearly explain how it publicizes consumers’ information, others are trying to fill the void. Most resources have the echo-chamber effect, only reaching people who care about privacy and social media to begin with. But if enough of these echoes escape and start ricocheting around the water coolers where more Facebook users hang out, then there’s a chance to bring the discussion to people who wouldn’t intentionally look for it.

Let’s look at several attempts to raise awareness about these privacy issues, and how likely they’ll break through the echo chamber:

Matt McKeon’s The Evolution of Privacy on Facebook (via All Facebook)

I keep returning to these illustrations of how Facebook’s default privacy settings have changed over the years. In 2005, userswould share some profile info with friends and their networks. By 2007, basic information was shared with all Facebook users. Now, the default settings allow almost all information to be shared with the entire Internet.

I’ve spent far longer studying the diagrams here than the text, and it’s striking going back and forth between the 2005 and 2010 images. If you’ve seen anything this clear in mainstream media, please share it in the comments, as these infographics are screaming for more exposure.

ReclaimPrivacy.org (via Anthony Haney on Facebook)

Using a bookmarklet you can drag to your browser’s bookmarks, log into Facebook and the link will tell you how secure your privacy settings are. As I continue to violate best practices for maintaining privacy, you can see a screen shot of ReclaimPrivacy’s review of my own settings. Somehow I managed to block all known applications that could leak my personal information, which must have been a fluke. All of my other settings are rated “caution” or “insecure.”

The best part of the tool is that it fixes some of your settings for you. Yet will you really trust a random tool more than Facebook? OK, maybe. Beyond coming from a largely unknown source, the bookmarklet approach will turn off more novice Internet users. It does work, though.

Openbook (via Danny Sullivan at Search Engine Land and MediaPost)

What if you could shame people into changing their privacy settings? Openbook searches public status updates for potentially questionable phrases people may share on Facebook. I’ve linked directly to one of the tamer ones, but if you clear the search field and search for something random, what comes up may not fly on network television. Many of the status updates are harmless, but some could be damaging. Searching the phrase “don’t tell anyone,” someone noted how she’s playing hooky from her job, and her profile page says what school district she works for. That won’t help her case for tenure if her district faces budget cuts this year.

I’m not sure how many people will see this, but using live examples of real people makes it easy to relate to them, and if you don’t change your settings because of it, you may well think twice about what you post on Facebook.

Diaspora

Tired of changing your settings? Are you one of ten people who left Facebook in the past month and now have your picture in a major national newspaper as the sign of a trend? Then do I have the network for you! Join Diaspora, “the privacy aware, personally controlled, do-it-all distributed open source social network.” If that’s not the tagline for the next 500 million-user social network, I don’t know what is. About 5,000 chipped in nearly $200,000 to make this project happen, well above the $10,000 goal. Aiming low has its perks.

Sorry, but I don’t know how that anti-Facebook angst translates into a Facebook rival. People weren’t looking to leave Six Degrees or Friendster or MySpace; they just kept finding something better and brought more of their friends. There are limits to that scale, so soon enough investors will seek social networks for nematodes or bacteria just to hit growth projections.

I’m not convinced any of these approaches are enough, and the privacy issue is hardly unique to social media. I know my bank has had digital security breaches, but I keep my money there, even if I change my password every so often. There are marketing services firms focused on direct mail and other channels that will probably collect far more data than Facebook ever will.

Facebook gets more attention, though, because it’s new, it’s massive, and we have more control over it than we’re used to. We can do something about it. It’s the monster under the bed we can overcome by shining a flashlight down below and realizing we have nothing to fear.

Yet sometimes it’s more fun to stay on the bed, worry ourselves to sleep, and wait until the morning comes, when we know for sure there’s no monster that can hurt us.


From today’s MediaPost Social Media Insider

4617591602_ed2cd9ded4_b

How do you get people to care about privacy?

People care about it in offline settings. At home, you know which window shades you prefer to draw closed at which times. At work, you might discuss Saturday night’s exploits with your cubicle-mate and not with your boss. Few can tell online; I can’t. I avoid networks like blippy that share purchases based on credit card data, and I turned off Google Latitude‘s option of automatically broadcasting my location from mobile devices, but I’m admittedly inconsistent and too laissez-faire with most other forms of social media. Leer más “How do you get people to care about privacy?”

Don’t Ever Send Press Releases to “Friends” on Facebook

A CEO of a company befriended me on Facebook, and while I can’t say I really knew him, I have him the benefit of the doubt. His company does seem genuinely interesting, and perhaps he’d be a good connection. Usually this kind of thinking results in some head-scratching moment as to why I befriended them in the first place (always due to the other’s invite). This case proved no different.


Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase

PR practitioners, here’s a very simple lesson: do not send press releases or mass mailed pitches to journalists you happen to be friends with on social networks. It’s very poor form, an intrusion, and lazy.

I had to blog this one, especially after Jeremy Epstein’s great post last week, “Dont Confuse Access with Permission.” He noted his own reason for “defriendification” on Facebook, and I’ve got one to contribute too. Leer más “Don’t Ever Send Press Releases to “Friends” on Facebook”