The 2011 Web Analytics Review – Infographic based on Google’s 2011 Data


Via Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

Hundreds of thousands of websites across the globe have participated in Google’s ongoing study of web browsing behavior. So far, the results of the study have been very insightful. For example, global bounce rates and average time-on-site metrics are decreasing. In the operating systems wars, the Macintosh market share is steadily growing, while the Windows market share is dropping. Dig into the data presented below to discover global web usage trends.

The 2011 Web Analytics Review

View an enlarged version of this Infographic »

Via blog.kissmetrics.com

Anuncios

Stat of the Day: Mobile Phones Overtake PCs

The Google data also finds that more consumers in each of these markets now have an internet-capable mobile device than have a desktop or laptop computer. In the U.S. the difference is nearly 10% more (76% to 68%), although consumers still report accessing the internet on multiple types of devices.

Tablets were seen as gaining share, hovering around 10% in each market outside the U.S. and slightly higher (17%) here. This week Pew Research Center issued some new numbers from its ongoing internet and American Life survey that show holiday sales of tablets and e-readers have doubled market share in a matter of weeks. The new Kindles and strong iPad sales helped drive that.


AdAgeStat

More Consumers in Key Global Markets Have Internet-Capable Mobile Devices Than Computers

By: New data from Google released exclusively to Ad Age shows the share of smartphone users on a fast rise, at the expense of feature-phone penetration. Feature phones allow internet access, but don’t have the full array of apps available to smartphones.
Alt Google Smartphone Penetration

The Google study looked at device ownership in five key global markets. Phase two of the survey was conducted in September and October 2011 and benchmarked against an earlier round conducted in January and February of last year. In each country, it’s easy to see the share of feature phones decreasing and the share of smartphones increasing. Leer más “Stat of the Day: Mobile Phones Overtake PCs”

Why Nobody Uses Opera

What’s going on here? Why are Firefox and Chrome eating away at Internet Explorer, while Opera is staying pretty much where it always was. It’s not that Opera is lagging behind development wise—new versions are coming out all the time. So what is it? Chrome and Firefox just have something that Opera doesn’t.

It’s all to do with brand positioning. Chrome is the fastest browser. It’s also the simplest. Google’s brand positioning is simplicity and speed, and they’ve made sure their offering is the leader in both. Firefox? The most customizable browser. Again, it’s a leader. If I want the most customizable browser, Firefox would be my first choice.

Internet Explorer, Safari and Opera? There’s nothing that comes to mind. IE and Safari are the “default” browsers on their respective operating systems. They don’t really try to differentiate themselves, although Apple (and Microsoft) have been advertising speed and standards compliance lately. Speed is easily tested however (and irrelevant if you’re not the leader), and standards compliance doesn’t matter so much since all modern browsers tend to render most sites just fine.


"O" logo used by Opera Software as t...

http://www.usabilitypost.com/2011/01/16/why-nobody-uses-opera/

The case of Opera is a strange one at first glance. Here is an innovative and powerful browser that’s fast, good looking and has all the features you might want—indeed, it has more features than all the other browsers, and tends to introduce the good things first (Opera had tabs first)—and yet with all of that it still has a tiny market share. Beyond a small, dedicated user base people just don’t use Opera. Here’s a graph of browser share of the recent years:

Browser usage chart

What’s going on here? Why are Firefox and Chrome eating away at Internet Explorer, while Opera is staying pretty much where it always was. It’s not that Opera is lagging behind development wise—new versions are coming out all the time. So what is it? Chrome and Firefox just have something that Opera doesn’t.

It’s all to do with brand positioning. Chrome is the fastest browser. It’s also the simplest. Google’s brand positioning is simplicity and speed, and they’ve made sure their offering is the leader in both. Firefox? The most customizable browser. Again, it’s a leader. If I want the most customizable browser, Firefox would be my first choice.

Internet Explorer, Safari and Opera? There’s nothing that comes to mind. IE and Safari are the “default” browsers on their respective operating systems. They don’t really try to differentiate themselves, although Apple (and Microsoft) have been advertising speed and standards compliance lately. Speed is easily tested however (and irrelevant if you’re not the leader), and standards compliance doesn’t matter so much since all modern browsers tend to render most sites just fine. Leer más “Why Nobody Uses Opera”

Why Nobody Uses Opera

It’s all to do with brand positioning. Chrome is the fastest browser. It’s also the simplest. Google’s brand positioning is simplicity and speed, and they’ve made sure their offering is the leader in both. Firefox? The most customizable browser. Again, it’s a leader. If I want the most customizable browser, Firefox would be my first choice.


"O" logo used by Opera Software as t...

http://www.usabilitypost.com/2011/01/16/why-nobody-uses-opera/

The case of Opera is a strange one at first glance. Here is an innovative and powerful browser that’s fast, good looking and has all the features you might want—indeed, it has more features than all the other browsers, and tends to introduce the good things first (Opera had tabs first)—and yet with all of that it still has a tiny market share. Beyond a small, dedicated user base people just don’t use Opera. Here’s a graph of browser share of the recent years:

Browser usage chart

What’s going on here? Why are Firefox and Chrome eating away at Internet Explorer, while Opera is staying pretty much where it always was. It’s not that Opera is lagging behind development wise—new versions are coming out all the time. So what is it? Chrome and Firefox just have something that Opera doesn’t. Leer más “Why Nobody Uses Opera”

Ballmer’s bonus slashed due to Kin failure

Ballmer saw his nice, fat bonus slashed in the wake of the failure of the Kin and the Microsoft tablet efforts. The bonus was cut despite the fact that Microsoft had its biggest year ever. Reuters report that the bonus Ballmer received was $670,000, equal to his salary.


By Shane McGlaun | http://www.slashgear.com/ballmers-bonus-slashed-due-to-kin-failure-01105548/

The failure of the Microsoft Kin phone was swift and epic. I haven’t seen a phone fail that fast before. You can bet the failure was felt around Microsoft and CEO Steve Ballmer may have felt the failure in his heart, but it hit is wallet too according to Reuters.ballmer sg

Ballmer saw his nice, fat bonus slashed in the wake of the failure of the Kin and the Microsoft tablet efforts. The bonus was cut despite the fact that Microsoft had its biggest year ever. Reuters report that the bonus Ballmer received was $670,000, equal to his salary. Leer más “Ballmer’s bonus slashed due to Kin failure”

Business Intelligence Tools for Marketing Your Services

Ever wonder how those savvy though somewhat annoying know-it-all’s can always quote the latest statistics or tell you exactly which color converts a sale and why your email newsletter template simply won’t do?

Well I won’t tell you to join the ranks of the snobby-but-accurate, but I will share with you some business intelligence tools to get the inside scoop on what works when marketing your services, not to mention a great method for reverse engineering the competition and showing your client how what you do will help them dominate their industry.
Websites for Spying on the Competition

Whether you’re researching what leaders in your (or your client’s) industry are doing to win market share or you’re interested in felling the guards at their gates to gain insider knowledge on their marketing strategy, these business intelligence solutions will help you spy on the competition and gain priceless knowledge on how to do them one better, or at least get a solid foothold in the game.
SpyFu

I love this site for digging into a website’s pay-per-click strategy. Imagine what it would be worth to your client (regardless of the services you’re offering) to know how much money his top competitor spends each day on paid search traffic, or the other top competitors in the space he may not have been aware of that spyfu ingeniously reveals. Find out what top PPC advertisers are bidding on – because those keywords are obviously making them money if they’ve been bidding on them for four months or longer (and top bidders are usually paying close attention and analyzing their campaigns – they don’t just let them run and hope it’s working).

What if you offer graphics design? How would this be useful to you? Well if I were you, I’d use this site to study my prospect’s competition, then see what their PPC landing pages look like, what types of graphics they use, where they’re placed, how they fit in to the overall strategy. If they’re good, you can get some great ideas to present to your prospect. If they’re bad you can now tell your prospect that their formidable opponent has a clear kink in their armor and like Achilles’ heel, you’ll help your prospect laser-focus their own graphics strategy to strike right at the heel and take over.


Ever wonder how those savvy though somewhat annoying know-it-all’s can always quote the latest statistics or tell you exactly which color converts a sale and why your email newsletter template simply won’t do?

Well I won’t tell you to join the ranks of the snobby-but-accurate, but I will share with you some business intelligence tools to get the inside scoop on what works when marketing your services, not to mention a great method for reverse engineering the competition and showing your client how what you do will help them dominate their industry.

Websites for Spying on the Competition

Whether you’re researching what leaders in your (or your client’s) industry are doing to win market share or you’re interested in felling the guards at their gates to gain insider knowledge on their marketing strategy, these business intelligence solutions will help you spy on the competition and gain priceless knowledge on how to do them one better, or at least get a solid foothold in the game.

SpyFu

I love this site for digging into a website’s pay-per-click strategy. Imagine what it would be worth to your client (regardless of the services you’re offering) to know how much money his top competitor spends each day on paid search traffic, or the other top competitors in the space he may not have been aware of that spyfu ingeniously reveals. Find out what top PPC advertisers are bidding on – because those keywords are obviously making them money if they’ve been bidding on them for four months or longer (and top bidders are usually paying close attention and analyzing their campaigns – they don’t just let them run and hope it’s working).

What if you offer graphics design? How would this be useful to you? Well if I were you, I’d use this site to study my prospect’s competition, then see what their PPC landing pages look like, what types of graphics they use, where they’re placed, how they fit in to the overall strategy. If they’re good, you can get some great ideas to present to your prospect. If they’re bad you can now tell your prospect that their formidable opponent has a clear kink in their armor and like Achilles’ heel, you’ll help your prospect laser-focus their own graphics strategy to strike right at the heel and take over. Leer más “Business Intelligence Tools for Marketing Your Services”

Yahoo Turns News Browsing Into Infinite Search

The feature, which is only being tested for a limited group of users, apparently results in twice the amount of user engagement. An existing search feature “Trending Now” lists, which bring trending topics to your browsing experience on Yahoo sites, has been upgraded slightly with search. Now when you click on a Trending Topic, Yahoo will show you search results on Yahoo for the topic. Yahoo also are now suggesting newsworthy topics based on the type of Yahoo portal your are on (ie sports topics on Yahoo Sports.

Infinate Browsing and the search addition to Trending Topics are just additional examples of Yahoo pumping up search query volume through automated searches, like the company does with slideshows and other content. It’s designed to drive its search market share up.


We know that Yahoo is integrating search with news, recently launching a news portal called the the Upshot, which uses search data to pick which stories to pursue. Today, Yahoo is integrating search into news content in yet another way—by suggesting search terms underneath news content on Yahoo News.

Called “Infinite Browse” internally at Yahoo, the new feature will include a box below Yahoo News articles that will suggest searches for specific terms. For example, news about Al Qaida will show links to searches for “Al-Qaida Camp” or “Al-Qaida Flags.” The idea is to allow readers to access related content they would search for without having to go to a separate search portal and type in the query. Leer más “Yahoo Turns News Browsing Into Infinite Search”