How Remix Culture Fuels Creativity & Invention: Kirby Ferguson at TED


Brain Pickings

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From Bob Dylan to Steve Jobs, or how copyright law came to hinder the very thing it set out to protect.

Remix culture is something I think about a great deal in the context ofcombinatorial creativity, and no one has done more to champion the popular understanding of remix as central to creativity than my friend and documentarian extraordinaire Kirby Ferguson. So I’m enormously proud of Kirby’s recent TED talk about his Everything is a Remix project, exploring remix culture, copyright and creativity — watch and take notes:

The Grey Album is a remix. It is new media created from old media. It was made using these three techniques: copy, transform and combine. It’s how you remix. You take existing songs, you chop them up, you transform the pieces, you combine them back together again, and you’ve got a new song, but that new song is clearly comprised of old songs.

But I think these aren’t just the components of remixing. I think these are the basic elements of all creativity. I think everything is a remix, and I think this is a better way to conceive of creativity.

[…] Leer más “How Remix Culture Fuels Creativity & Invention: Kirby Ferguson at TED”

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Hashtag Basics: How They Work – Why They Fail | via blog.myprgenie.com


 

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Nearly every marketer uses Twitter – and the vast majority of us also use hashtags – the letters that follow the pound or number sign (#) in a tweet. But here are five things you might not know about hashtags that could help you boost your Twitter results dramatically.

For example, did you know that Twitter didn’t invent hashtags? Twitter users did. Google employee Chris Messina is credited as the “hashtag Godfather” for an August, 2007 tweet in which he suggested using the pound sign as a way to organize groups on Twitter. His original idea was that like minded people could find and follow each other more easily if they self-identified their interests with hashtags.

Also, hashtags can be used in two different ways – to group tweets into categories, so they’re easier to find, and also to indicate that the person tweeting is adding an ironic comment to the message. Most of the time, people use them to add personality to a tweet, and reach people who might be searching for a particular topic.

A lot of entertainment marketers use hashtags to build communities around television programming, celebrities, books or movies – and so do smart brand marketers. They’re especially useful during natural disasters — hurricanes, earthquakes, blizzards and the like — when people want to know what’s happening in a specific location.

Of course, there are times when a hashtag is not appropriate. For instance, last year Entenmann’s was promoting its line of low-fat bakery products with the hashtag #notguilty. Unfortunately, on the day Florida mother Casey Anthony was found not guilty of killing her young daughter, the company’s ongoing social media campaign sent a scheduled tweet using that hashtag – and it wound up in the middle of the comments about the murder trial.

So the first rule of using a hashtag is to search for it before you use it, and make sure that you aren’t dropping a marketing message into the middle of something else that uses the same hashtag.  This is especially true if you schedule tweets in advance – check periodically to make sure that the hashtags you’ve added to pending tweets haven’t become associated with something you’d rather not be associated with.

Here are five times when you should definitely use hashtags.

Engaging Event Attendees Leer más “Hashtag Basics: How They Work – Why They Fail | via blog.myprgenie.com”

Minimalism in Web Design: Clear Perfection

Minimalist designs make the simple things simple, and the complex things possible. My aim is to combine simple elegance and functionality to a timeless form. – Xavier Lust.

Minimalism as a web design trend came back not long ago. It was a move away from gaudy, elaborate graphics and design schemes, and a shift back towards simple, understated design. It was a comeback of the design at its most basic and simple elements, free from superfluous shapes and complex color combinations.

I would have written a shorter letter, but I didn’t have the time. – Mark Twain.

Jonathan Ive
Jonathan Ive
Aspects and Features of a Modern Minimal Web Design

In today’s world web minimalism is still all the rage, and the main reason of the trend’s popularity is people’s love for friendly and lightweight yet stylish and unobtrusive simple designs. By simple is not meant primitive. Some of the websites with minimalistic design have a number of shiny effects and use advanced forms of CSS and Ajax. But they seem to favor a cleaner, more clutter-free experience, and put a premium on white space.

So, what are the main distinctive features and aspects that make a modern web design minimalistic?

It is too easy for novices, too difficult for professionals. – A saying about playing Mozart.

Minimizing Content

The core function of a minimalistic design is to be able to present a clear message to the visitors. In order to achieve that, it is necessary to re-think the content and modify it to meet the design’s requirements. You’ll have to remove most of the graphic elements and images, but you should do it wisely, because it is very easy to go too far in an attempt to simplify the layout therefore you risk making the design boring.


By: Tina Zennand
http://www.onextrapixel.com/2010/11/19/minimalism-in-web-design-clear-perfection/

Minimalism in art appeared in the late 1960’s. The main principle of the movement is simplicity in form and content; in order to achieve this, personal expression is removed. The aim of minimalism artists is to build their compositions in such a way that visitors perceive the artwork as deeper and more intense.

It can be achieved by making the themes clear from clutter. Minimalism is often manifested as abstract art, but it can also be very beautiful.

Minimalism in Web Design: Clear Perfection
Image credit: Todd Klassy

Minimalism as a Web Design

Minimalist designs make the simple things simple, and the complex things possible. My aim is to combine simple elegance and functionality to a timeless form. – Xavier Lust.

Minimalism as a web design trend came back not long ago. It was a move away from gaudy, elaborate graphics and design schemes, and a shift back towards simple, understated design. It was a comeback of the design at its most basic and simple elements, free from superfluous shapes and complex color combinations.

I would have written a shorter letter, but I didn’t have the time. – Mark Twain.

Jonathan Ive
Jonathan Ive

Aspects and Features of a Modern Minimal Web Design

In today’s world web minimalism is still all the rage, and the main reason of the trend’s popularity is people’s love for friendly and lightweight yet stylish and unobtrusive simple designs. By simple is not meant primitive. Some of the websites with minimalistic design have a number of shiny effects and use advanced forms of CSS and Ajax. But they seem to favor a cleaner, more clutter-free experience, and put a premium on white space.

So, what are the main distinctive features and aspects that make a modern web design minimalistic?

It is too easy for novices, too difficult for professionals. – A saying about playing Mozart.

Minimizing Content

The core function of a minimalistic design is to be able to present a clear message to the visitors. In order to achieve that, it is necessary to re-think the content and modify it to meet the design’s requirements. You’ll have to remove most of the graphic elements and images, but you should do it wisely, because it is very easy to go too far in an attempt to simplify the layout therefore you risk making the design boring. Leer más “Minimalism in Web Design: Clear Perfection”

How to Be Yourself

“The real voyage of discovery consists not
in seeking new lands but seeing with new eyes.”
~ Marcel Proust

Have you ever been in a social setting, suddenly realizing you are not being yourself? This article takes an in depth look at why we play various roles in our lives, and how to overcome these socially conditioned “masks” to be yourself.

Perhaps you’ve caught yourself saying, “I love catching up with my old school buddies, it’s so easy to be myself in their company”? Or, “Felt so miserable at that party, making polite conversation with bunch of superficial people.”

It transpires that we are often not our true selves in the company of others – subconsciously and repeatedly wearing masks that project a certain image of us to the world.

We seem to have a collection of these masks that habitually surface, intending to best serve our self-interest, based on the need of our immediate environment. These masks come in varied shapes and colors like, the aggressor, the conformist, the nice guy, the shy one, etc.

Only when we are able to bring these masks into our active awareness and deal with them, can we be ourselves and experience the freedom that brings.


By Rajiv Vij

“The real voyage of discovery consists not
in seeking new lands but seeing with new eyes.”

~ Marcel Proust

Have you ever been in a social setting, suddenly realizing you are not being yourself? This article takes an in depth look at why we play various roles in our lives, and how to overcome these socially conditioned “masks” to be yourself.

Perhaps you’ve caught yourself saying, “I love catching up with my old school buddies, it’s so easy to be myself in their company”? Or, “Felt so miserable at that party, making polite conversation with bunch of superficial people.”

It transpires that we are often not our true selves in the company of others – subconsciously and repeatedly wearing masks that project a certain image of us to the world.

We seem to have a collection of these masks that habitually surface, intending to best serve our self-interest, based on the need of our immediate environment. These masks come in varied shapes and colors like, the aggressor, the conformist, the nice guy, the shy one, etc.

Only when we are able to bring these masks into our active awareness and deal with them, can we be ourselves and experience the freedom that brings. Leer más “How to Be Yourself”

Cómo dar un discurso efectivo en la empresa (sin aburrir en el intento)

Los buenos discursos no surgen por generación espontánea. El irónico Mark Twain lo dejó bien claro: “Normalmente se tarda más de tres semanas en preparar un buen discurso improvisado”. Veamos algunos consejos…
Por IESE Insight

A Brian O’Connor Leggett, profesor del departamento de Dirección de Personas en las Organizaciones del IESE, siempre le ha interesado el uso de la retórica en la dirección de empresas.

Así, en su artículo “Introduction to Corporate Speech Making” (“Introducción al discurso corporativo”) ofrece una serie de consejos para los ejecutivos menos locuaces.


Los buenos discursos no surgen por generación espontánea. El irónico Mark Twain lo dejó bien claro: “Normalmente se tarda más de tres semanas en preparar un buen discurso improvisado”. Veamos algunos consejos…
Por IESE Insight

A Brian O’Connor Leggett, profesor del departamento de Dirección de Personas en las Organizaciones del IESE, siempre le ha interesado el uso de la retórica en la dirección de empresas.

Así, en su artículo “Introduction to Corporate Speech Making” (“Introducción al discurso corporativo”) ofrece una serie de consejos para los ejecutivos menos locuaces. Leer más “Cómo dar un discurso efectivo en la empresa (sin aburrir en el intento)”

Link Round Up


AuthorLindsay

We wanted to try something different this week.

Every day we come across dozens of inspiring, insightful, or just plain entertaining links. Here’s some of our favorites we wanted to share.

flame_link

Flame

Holy wow. This experiment created by Peter Blaskovic has left us with mouths ajar. He’s created a painting program that allows users to create their own flaming masterpieces! Check it out –try your own and be sure to check out the Flame gallery.

Should Managers Know How To Code?

It’s a common debate amongst the management-side and the ones in the trenches. Scott Berkum explores this topic in a recent blog post.

Project 15

Fifteen rules I live and design by” as declared by our Creative Director’s alter-ego Dixon Garett. My favorite is 12: Those who see the glass as half-full or half-empty aren’t seeing the whole picture.

Making Magic

Mike Arauz explains what makes magic – when tricks and storytelling combine. Take Rick Jay for example, a great slight-of-hand artist. He’s equal parts storyteller and equal parts trickster, making him one amazing magician.

The Shirky Principle

Wired’s Kevin Kelly builds on the observations of NYU professor, Clay Shirky. “Institutions will try to preserve the problem to which they are the solution.”  When is it time to let go of the problems we’ve grown so accustomed to solving?

Mark Twain on Writing

A link passed on by our Copywriter, Faelan: Nothing helps me write good copy like reading the advice of a master. Almost always the same rules apply (both of us are telling stories after all), and they make me stay focused and keep my message clear.

Come across anything shareable? Feel free to post it in the comments. Have a great weekend!

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