There Is No Mobile Internet! // @smashingmag – smashingmagazine.com


By Marek Wolski

A Quiet Change

At the beginning of June, Google published on its Webmaster Central Blog its “Recommendations for Building Smartphone-Optimized Websites.” Its recommendations are that responsiveness — or, where necessary, device-specific HTML — is the way to build websites for today. Both methods are based on all devices accessing one URL, which in Google’s words makes it “easier for your users to interact with, share, and link to…”

Following the recommendation means making most of your Web content accessible across devices. It ensures that each link shared across the Web leads back to the same place and that, irrespective of the user’s device, everyone gets the same design experience. It aims to standardize Web design approaches, but also to standardize user experience expectations.

Shortly after, Apple announced a lot of thrilling updates to iOS 6. One of the least talked about was Safari’s iCloud tabs. This syncs your open browser tabs and allows you to continue browsing from where you left off on another device. Google’s recent version of Chrome for iOS has the same feature. The result? The ultimate cross-media surfing experience, a digital doggy bag.

After many years of Internet people working on standards, technologies and practices to bring about a One Web experience, the two companies made a big push towards making it a reality. We are now a big step closer to, in the words of the W3C, “an Internet where as far as reasonably possible, the same information and services are available to users irrespective of the device they are using.” Well, that is only if website owners and brands get their act together and change their old ways. To do so, they will need to recognize that things aren’t what they seem and aren’t what many are still peddling.

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Old Habits, Old Stereotypes

A couple of years ago, mobile devices couldn’t even handle many of the Web’s fundamental standards (JavaScript, for example). But as devices became as powerful as last year’s MacBook, the technology drove a behavioral shift. It wasn’t just early adopters who were using the mobile Web. It was every person and their dog with a smartphone and a 3G connection (around 75% of smartphone owners surf the Web).

Our Mobile Planet - General Smartphone Activities
Image source: Our Mobile Planet.

The line between what is and isn’t Web-enabled is blurring. People don’t see the Internet on their phone or tablet as being the “mobile Internet.” It’s just the Internet. In the words of mobile expert Brad Frost, “mobile users will do anything and everything desktop users will do, provided it’s presented in a usable way.”

For the last few years, across categories, mobile experience benchmarking studies have been filled with recommendations to broaden and deepen the content available. Users are searching more and longer for information that currently isn’t available on mobile or even tablet devices.

Mobile Site vs Full Site
Image source: Strangeloop.

This desire for information is prevalent and strong enough that many opt for a less than optimal visit to the “full site” in order to access more or other information. The fact that almost a third of mobile users are prepared to endure poor navigation, slow loading times and no touch optimization really underscores the presence of this fundamental behavior.

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Why Writing With Our Hands Is Still Important | readwrite.com


I first noticed something was off when I went to pay my rent one month. The window for a timely online transfer of funds was closing, so to get the money to my landlord in time, I’d have to do something unusual. I took out my checkbook, grabbed a pen and started writing the date.

It felt weird. My hand cramped a little, churning out numbers and letters with the slightest – but still noticeable – discomfort. My handwriting sucked. It suddenly occurred to me that I hadn’t actually written anything by hand in a long, long time. Just a few years earlier, I kept a paper journal by my bed and would buy three-packs of Moleskin notebooks for brainstorming, sketching and jotting things down. What happened?

Why Writing With Our Hands Is Still Important John Paul Titlow

Over the course of the last four or five years, several little computers have found their way into my life. Bit by bit, my professional and creative existence made the transition to an entirely digital universe. At my old job managing digital publishing for a newspaper, the iPad soon replaced my spiral notebook in meetings. Then I left the print world to work on the Internet full-time. I could even sign my freelance contracts with my finger on an iPad.

Who needed paper? Isn’t the future amazing? Look, more tweets. Wait, what was I saying?

Our Pixel-Based Lives Leer más “Why Writing With Our Hands Is Still Important | readwrite.com”

Cómo puede adaptar un desarrollador web sus sitios web a la pantalla Retina Display


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Cómo puede adaptar un desarrollador web sus sitios web a la pantalla Retina Display

 Cómo puede adaptar un desarrollador web sus sitios web a la pantalla Retina Display

Que la pantalla Retina Display del nuevo MacBook Pro es alucinante no lo puede negar nadie que la haya visto en directo. Una pantalla con 5 millones de píxeles y una resolución de 2880×1800 es algo completamente extraordinario, se mire por donde se mire. Pero hay algunas personas que quizás no la vean con tan buenos ojos, y estos son los desarrolladores web. Las pantallas Retina Display ya están en el iPhone 4 y 4S, iPad de tercera generación y MacBook Pro, y lo más probable es que se empiecen a extender a otros equipos como los iMac, MacBook Air, etc… Así que los sitios web deberán adaptarse. Leer más “Cómo puede adaptar un desarrollador web sus sitios web a la pantalla Retina Display”

Hands on: Asus Zenbook

Ultrabooks are the PC world’s latest attempt to wrestle back more of the portability market from tablets. In a nutshell, ultrabooks aim to deliver the grunt of a notebook within the petitie frame of a netbook – following in the footsteps of Apple’s MacBook Air.

Two weeks ago I took a look at the Toshiba Satellite Z830, a 13.3-inch ultrabook that’s packed with features but hampered by the somewhat cramped keyboard. Today I’m sitting down with an Asus Zenbook, which is available in four models; a choice of 11.6-inch or 13.3-inch displays sporting Core i5 or i7 processors. I’m looking at the 11.6-inch Zenbook UX21E RY008V with the Core i7 powerplant.


Asus Zenbook.Asus Zenbook.

Asus’ Zenbook struggles to strike a harmonious balance between portability and usability.

Ultrabooks are the PC world’s latest attempt to wrestle back more of the portability market from tablets. In a nutshell, ultrabooks aim to deliver the grunt of a notebook within the petitie frame of a netbook – following in the footsteps of Apple’s MacBook Air.

Two weeks ago I took a look at the Toshiba Satellite Z830, a 13.3-inch ultrabook that’s packed with features but hampered by the somewhat cramped keyboard. Today I’m sitting down with an Asus Zenbook, which is available in four models; a choice of 11.6-inch or 13.3-inch displays sporting Core i5 or i7 processors. I’m looking at the 11.6-inch Zenbook UX21E RY008V with the Core i7 powerplant. Leer más “Hands on: Asus Zenbook”

Apple’s iMac And MacBook Touch Patents Tease iOS-Convertible Devices

You’re Apple. You’re selling millions of iPhones, millions of iPads, and millions of notebooks. The App Store is printing money, but conversion rates aren’t fast enough for your liking. How do you get more people hooked on your mobile and touch platform? Easy: convert all your devices into iOS devices. iOS convertibles, to be precise.

A patent filing by Apple describes a pair of devices with the plain object of providing the user with both OS X and iOS on demand. The iMac Touch (not an official term, but good enough) would lean over and tilt up, providing a tablet-like surface on which to browse or play games. The MacBook Touch would feature a swiveling, flipping screen much like existing laptop-tablet convertibles. I don’t know about you, but I think they sound great. And expensive.



You’re Apple. You’re selling millions of iPhones, millions of iPads, and millions of notebooks. The App Store is printing money, but conversion rates aren’t fast enough for your liking. How do you get more people hooked on your mobile and touch platform? Easy: convert all your devices into iOS devices. iOS convertibles, to be precise.

A patent filing by Apple
describes a pair of devices with the plain object of providing the user with both OS X and iOS on demand. The iMac Touch (not an official term, but good enough) would lean over and tilt up, providing a tablet-like surface on which to browse or play games. The MacBook Touch would feature a swiveling, flipping screen much like existing laptop-tablet convertibles. I don’t know about you, but I think they sound great. And expensive. Leer más “Apple’s iMac And MacBook Touch Patents Tease iOS-Convertible Devices”