Problem Solving Skills Different Than Intelligence

Professor Mylonadis suspects that the reason that our problem-solving ability in management is limited is because our models of problem-solving are devoid of people while actual problem-solving isn’t. As useful as a decision tree might be as an analytical abstraction, the issue is how do you actually define a problem with the help of others around you? Who should these people be? What kind of input should you be asking from them? Which part of that input should you disregard? Which part of that input should you take into account?

He says further, “If you look at engineering or architecture the ability of people to explain the problem they’re working on, and ask questions so they can get feedback is very high without their need to resort to either dogma or trivia. They are helped by reference to blueprints which are a highly codified way of communicating. Our equivalent in management is jargon. Like blueprints, jargon was invented to make our exchanges efficient (we all know what is meant by a “functional organization”.) But the analogy to the blueprint ends when jargon becomes meaningless. It is also a sure way of eradicating any arguments left standing from the onslaught of dogma or trivia.”


Putting More Smart People On A Problem Might Not Be The Answer
by Idris Mootee

Problem Solving Skills Different Than IntelligenceEarly breakfast in a Boston hotel and I’m ready for an executive workshop. There are so many decision to be made in one day and just over breakfast we’re made several important decisions on some strategic issues. I realize 70% of my time on a day-to-day basis are spent on problem solving – organizational, strategic, customers, people and resources etc. It is pretty much the biggest part of any managerial job. Problem solving skills development is therefore critical for young managers.

If you’re a well educated, highly intelligent person and have a well-respected job in your chosen career, it usually means you are a good problem solver both in professional and personal settings. Professor Yiorgos Mylonadis at London Business School research is finding otherwise. His recent research shows that people can be extremely well educated with many years of experience, they may be successful managers who have accomplished great things, but frequently their ability to solve a problem is severely limited. Leer más “Problem Solving Skills Different Than Intelligence”

De elefantes y pulgas habla Charles Handy

Irlandés, filósofo, autor de 20 libros sobre management y conducta organizacional. The Elephant and the Flee (2001) no es su último libro, pero los temas que trata allí siguen generando atención y, sobre todo, preocupación.

Muchos ven en Charles Handy al más grande pensador británico del management. Le ha dado a ese campo, dicen, la elocuencia y elegancia filosófica que le faltaba. En realidad, ha hecho mucho más. Desde que dejó su alto cargo en Shell en 1965, fue consultor y conferencista además de co fundador y profesor de la London Business School. De sus 15 libros publicados, uno de los últimos es The Elephant and The Flea (El elefante y la pulga) del cual habla aquí con Stephen Bernhut, director del Ivey Business Journal.

Un mundo de elefantes y pulgas. ¿Cómo llegó a esa clasificación?


Irlandés, filósofo, autor de 20 libros sobre management y conducta organizacional. The Elephant and the Flee (2001) no es su último libro, pero los temas que trata allí siguen generando atención y, sobre todo, preocupación.

Muchos ven en Charles Handy al más grande pensador británico del management. Le ha dado a ese campo, dicen, la elocuencia y elegancia filosófica que le faltaba. En realidad, ha hecho mucho más. Desde que dejó su alto cargo en Shell en 1965, fue consultor y conferencista además de co fundador y profesor de la London Business School. De sus 15 libros publicados, uno de los últimos es The Elephant and The Flea (El elefante y la pulga) del cual habla aquí con Stephen Bernhut, director del Ivey Business Journal.

Un mundo de elefantes y pulgas. ¿Cómo llegó a esa clasificación? Leer más “De elefantes y pulgas habla Charles Handy”

Moonshots

En mayo de 2008, treinta y cinco pensadores y academicos sobre management se reunieron para comenzar a definir una agenda sobre la innovación de los modelos de gestión del siglo 21. Esta brigada de “renegados” como se autodenominan incluyó a personas de la talla de Gary Hamel, Peter Senge, CK Prahalad (quien falleció lamentablemente hace unos pocos días), Jeffrey Pfeffer, Yves Doz, y Tom Malone, pensadores de la nueva era de la gestión como James Surowiecki y McAfee Andrew, CEOs progresistas como John Mackey (Whole Foods), Eric Schmidt (Google), Terri Kelly (WL Gore), Tim Brown (IDEO), y Vineet Nayar (HCL Technologies).

Hay dos resultados sobresalientes de este grupo de personas y que recomiendo seguir.
Por un lado y con el apoyo del London Business School of Management la creación de MLABs, un laboratorio de investigación, una especie de Thinktank sobre Management 2.0.

De este grupo de trabajo ya están apareciendo algunos resultados como este nuevo libro escrito por Julian Birkinshaw, co-fundador del MLAB: Reinventing Management. Por otro lado, MLAB tiene una publicación mensual que puede descargarse desde su web.


En mayo de 2008, treinta y cinco pensadores y academicos sobre management se reunieron para comenzar a definir una agenda sobre la innovación de los modelos de gestión del siglo 21. Esta brigada de “renegados” como se autodenominan incluyó a personas de la talla de Gary Hamel, Peter Senge, CK Prahalad (quien falleció lamentablemente hace unos pocos días), Jeffrey Pfeffer, Yves Doz, y Tom Malone, pensadores de la nueva era de la gestión como James Surowiecki y McAfee Andrew, CEOs progresistas como John Mackey (Whole Foods), Eric Schmidt (Google), Terri Kelly (WL Gore), Tim Brown (IDEO), y Vineet Nayar (HCL Technologies). Leer más “Moonshots”

Five first steps to finding a job abroad


DIANE MORGAN, FORBES.COM

More people than ever are searching for jobs internationally in the hope of gaining knowledge and experience from around the globe. In response to the economic upheavals of the last year, more Westerners are looking for employment in emerging markets, such as the Middle East, India, Eastern Europe and China. The benefits of international work experience can be huge, but you need to follow the right steps to find and land the right job. Here are five.