Which Facebook Deal is Best for your Company

Types of Facebook Deals:

Individual Facebook Deal – To claim this type of deal, users need to only check into a venue once. When the user checks in, they click “Claim Deal,” which changes their phone screen to say, “Show phone screen at register to redeem.” Any venue offering these giveaways should be sure that the staff is well-versed on how to fulfill the deal.

The individual deal is best for venues looking to attract new visitors. Each time a person redeems a deal, it’s posted to his/her Facebook wall, making your venue front and center for his/her 100-1,000 friends.

What to be aware of: Deals are new for most users, so messaging and staff training are a necessity. Also, a major challenge for new users of Facebook check-ins is that instead of waiting for their phone to auto-populate with nearby locations, they have the option to create their own venue if they can’t find yours. If they make their own, they’ll never see your official location or your deal.

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At the dismay of my friends that are not engulfed in social media, I’ve been doing quite a bit of research into LBS programs and what works and doesn’t work with each one. For the past month, I’ve been looking into Facebook Places, more specifically its new Deals program.

If you’re not up to speed, Facebook enables companies to claim their venue so when smart phone users check-in, the location is tied back to the official Facebook page (see The San Diego Museum of Art for example).

Once a company has claimed its venue, the admin of the official page can create a Facebook Deal. The challenge of marketers is to decide “which type of deal is right for my brand?” I’ve come to find there are some loopholes in some of the deals that marketers should be aware of before deciding. Leer más “Which Facebook Deal is Best for your Company”

8 Things That Need To Happen In Social Media In 2011

Twitter Monetization

Twitter can still claim that they are in their growth phase but with a recent round of funding valuing them at close to 4 billion they need to start thinking about monetization very soon. They’ve had a spectacular year of growth and Twitter continues to be one of the most useful tools around that many of us simply could not live without for a number of seasons but they are a business at the end of the day and they simply can’t keep burning through cash at the rate they are if they are to succeed long term. They’ve tried a couple of things over the last year with limited success but they need to find that automated self serve ad platform like Google and Facebook have in place that generates them billions in revenue over the coming years. They have the users and enough smart people working there to do it so my guess is that by the end of 2011 they’ll start to get there.


Author of 8 Things That Need To Happen In Social Media In 2011

http://www.simplyzesty.com/social-media/8-things-that-need-to-happen-in-social-media-in-2011/

It’s been a great year in 2010 for social media where the industry has really burst in to the mainstream and been embraced by brands and business but I wanted to look at some of the main things that need to happen in 2011 for the progress to continue. The main social networks are covered here as well as looking at some of the bigger industry trends and all in all I’d have to say social media as an industry is in great health and if anything I’d say it’s at the very start of it’s growth and 2011 should really go on and re-enforce that and see some exciting things happening.

Twitter Monetization

Twitter can still claim that they are in their growth phase but with a recent round of funding valuing them at close to 4 billion they need to start thinking about monetization very soon. They’ve had a spectacular year of growth and Twitter continues to be one of the most useful tools around that many of us simply could not live without for a number of seasons but they are a business at the end of the day and they simply can’t keep burning through cash at the rate they are if they are to succeed long term. They’ve tried a couple of things over the last year with limited success but they need to find that automated self serve ad platform like Google and Facebook have in place that generates them billions in revenue over the coming years. They have the users and enough smart people working there to do it so my guess is that by the end of 2011 they’ll start to get there. Leer más “8 Things That Need To Happen In Social Media In 2011”

Use of Geosocial Services is Underwhelming — for Now

Based on a Pew Internet survey released this morning, only 4 percent of American adults who go online on a regular basis are using any form of geosocial or location-based services like Foursquare. And on any given day, only 1 percent of internet users are taking advantage of these services. To complete the survey, Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, based in Washington, D.C., contacted 3,001 ages 18 and older between Aug. 9 and Sept. 13, 2010.

Not surprisingly, the report shows that those who are in the habit of sharing their immediate location with their friends — or “checking in” with acquaintances who might be in the immediate neighborhood — are more likely to be young and mobile adults between the ages of 18 and 29. These geosocial gadflies who go online with their mobile phones use a location-based service like Foursquare or Gowalla, according to the study.

But perhaps we should take a second to describe the geosocial service to those who might be unfamiliar with the concept. Location-based services, which run on standalone software applications, or “apps,” permit users of smartphones and other mobile devices to notify friends when the user is nearby


Based on a Pew Internet survey released this morning, only 4 percent of American adults who go online on a regular basis are using any form of geosocial or location-based services like Foursquare. And on any given day, only 1 percent of internet users are taking advantage of these services. To complete the survey, Pew Research Center‘s Internet & American Life Project, based in Washington, D.C., contacted 3,001 ages 18 and older between Aug. 9 and Sept. 13, 2010.

Not surprisingly, the report shows that those who are in the habit of sharing their immediate location with their friends — or “checking in” with acquaintances who might be in the immediate neighborhood — are more likely to be young and mobile adults between the ages of 18 and 29. These geosocial gadflies who go online with their mobile phones use a location-based service like Foursquare or Gowalla, according to the study.

But perhaps we should take a second to describe the geosocial service to those who might be unfamiliar with the concept. Location-based services, which run on standalone software applications, or “apps,” permit users of smartphones and other mobile devices to notify friends when the user is nearby Leer más “Use of Geosocial Services is Underwhelming — for Now”

Beyond Foursquare: The Next Generation of Customer Loyalty – Michael Schneider and Anne Mai Bertelsen – The Conversation – Harvard Business Review


Today, loyalty programs are often siloed and limited to the interactions between two axes: the customer and spending. In the best of these programs, a brand knows exactly what the customer is spending and how frequently. On the other hand, while brands have spending data across their own locations, they lack knowledge of what kind of business the customer is giving competitors.

If location-based services began collecting the size and frequency of purchases across all locations and mining the data of check-ins (including likes and dislikes), they could begin to build the next generation of loyalty rewards programs comprised of customer, spending, location, and sentiment. Such a program would benefit location-based service providers, brands, and customers alike.

Take this example: if every day a consumer purchases a latte from Starbucks and then walks across the street to Dunkin’ Donuts to pick up a turkey sausage flatbread, both companies could benefit from that information. If many customers display similar habits, Starbucks could add a similar breakfast sandwich to their menu or even discontinue their current breakfast fare at that location.

That level of data provides a more holistic view of consumer behavior, and could ultimately help brands become more relevant and timely. In the example above, in addition to knowing consumers’ breakfast sandwich habits, Starbucks could also learn whether individuals go to Starbucks all or most of the time for coffee. The company could then use that market insight to offer coffee-consumers individual promotions to try their food items, instead of promotions for coffee which the consumer already gladly purchases at full price.

vía:
Beyond Foursquare: The Next Generation of Customer Loyalty – Michael Schneider and Anne Mai Bertelsen – The Conversation – Harvard Business Review.

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Study: Location-Based Services Users are Passionate but Niche

A new report released today from mobile media provider Myxer examines the current trends among “check-in” applications, that is, the particular group of location-based mobile social networks that allow users to announce their arrival at a specific venue in return for rewards, coupons, deals or other offers. The company found that among the top mobile check-in applications, there was a clear leader: Booyah Networks’ MyTown, a location-based game built around your own city’s local shops and businesses. MyTown is heavily favored by consumers, attracting 56% of the mobile audience that uses location-based applications such as these. Loopt was in second place, with 12% of users and Gowalla and Foursquare lagged even further behind, at only 8% each.

However, only 11% of mobile users are participating in the location-based social networking community, with the majority of mobile users claiming they’re simply “not interested” in these types services.


By Sarah Perez<!– –>

A new report released today from mobile media provider Myxer examines the current trends among “check-in” applications, that is, the particular group of location-based mobile social networks that allow users to announce their arrival at a specific venue in return for rewards, coupons, deals or other offers. The company found that among the top mobile check-in applications, there was a clear leader: Booyah Networks’ MyTown, a location-based game built around your own city’s local shops and businesses. MyTown is heavily favored by consumers, attracting 56% of the mobile audience that uses location-based applications such as these. Loopt was in second place, with 12% of users and Gowalla and Foursquare lagged even further behind, at only 8% each.

However, only 11% of mobile users are participating in the location-based social networking community, with the majority of mobile users claiming they’re simply “not interested” in these types services.

Myxer surveyed over 1,500 users in the U.S. and found that only 11% of the respondents used these location-based mobile applications. While that figure seems low, it’s actually several points higher than analyst firm Forrester Research’s report from July, which claimed that only 4% of U.S. adults used apps like these.

Forrester also claimed that only 1% of those who use location-based apps do so more than once per week. Myxer, however, found heavier usage. 31% of those surveyed claimed they check-in a couple of times per week, 30% check in once per day, 26% check in every hour (who are these people, we wonder?) and 13% said they check in just a couple of times per month.

The new survey also found that the use of location-based services is increasing within its user base, with 74% saying they’ve been using the apps more often than before, while 27% said they’ve been decreasing their use. Nearly half (47%) of respondents say they use 2-5 location-based social networks, 45% say they use just one and only 8% say they use 6 or more. Leer más “Study: Location-Based Services Users are Passionate but Niche”

Run A Marathon… In Your Web Browser… No Moving Required

Running a marathon is hard. I should know, I’ve never even considered running one. But a lot of people do. And a lot of people like the idea of going to watch others run marathons. I have no idea why, but they do — I’ve seen it on TV. Anyway, if you have any interest in tracking a marathon, Skyhook Wireless has a pretty cool way of doing it.

The San Francisco Marathon is this coming Sunday. To coincide with it, Skyhook Wireless has set up a new “Skyhook Experience” to track the event. On their page, you’ll be able to see geotagged tweets, Flickr photos, and Foursquare check-ins all around the event in realtime. You’ll also be able to go back in time (with a slider) to watch all of the aforementioned data evolve.

The idea is similar to the Vicarious.ly site SimpleGeo set up for SXSW. Like SimpleGeo, Skyhook is doing this to showcase their data. On the map you can not only see (and click on) individual data points, but you can see heat maps of particularly hot areas of geo data.


Running a marathon is hard. I should know, I’ve never even considered running one. But a lot of people do. And a lot of people like the idea of going to watch others run marathons. I have no idea why, but they do — I’ve seen it on TV. Anyway, if you have any interest in tracking a marathon, Skyhook Wireless has a pretty cool way of doing it.

The San Francisco Marathon is this coming Sunday. To coincide with it, Skyhook Wireless has set up a new “Skyhook Experience” to track the event. On their page, you’ll be able to see geotagged tweets, Flickr photos, and Foursquare check-ins all around the event in realtime. You’ll also be able to go back in time (with a slider) to watch all of the aforementioned data evolve.

The idea is similar to the Vicarious.ly site SimpleGeo set up for SXSW. Like SimpleGeo, Skyhook is doing this to showcase their data. On the map you can not only see (and click on) individual data points, but you can see heat maps of particularly hot areas of geo data. Leer más “Run A Marathon… In Your Web Browser… No Moving Required”

Sharing Locations the Facebook Way

AuthorLindsay
The world anxiously awaits as Facebook promises to unveil its location-based status updates this month.

Okay, maybe not the world… But I, for one, sure am curious!

So far, Facebook has played their cards close to the chest, but it is rumored they will partner with an established location-based social network like Gowalla or Foursquare. Alternatively, they could develop and implement their own system. Either way, Location-Based Social Networks (LBSNs) are picking up steam quickly and Facebook, with their 400M + user base (100M+ mobile), are bound to tip location-sharing over the edge into the mainstream.


Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase
AuthorLindsay
The world anxiously awaits as Facebook promises to unveil its location-based status updates this month.

Okay, maybe not the world… But I, for one, sure am curious!

So far, Facebook has played their cards close to the chest, but it is rumored they will partner with an established location-based social network like Gowalla or Foursquare. Alternatively, they could develop and implement their own system. Either way, Location-Based Social Networks (LBSNs) are picking up steam quickly and Facebook, with their 400M + user base (100M+ mobile), are bound to tip location-sharing over the edge into the mainstream. Leer más “Sharing Locations the Facebook Way”