Crean una batería en aerosol


http://america.infobae.com

Permite convertir a cualquier objeto en fuente de energía. Está hecha en base aiones de litio, que se utilizan en celulares, laptops y autos eléctricos

El producto es más potente y tiene mayor capacidad de almacenamiento que la mayoría de las baterías recargablesNeelam Singh, un estudiante de ingeniería en laUniversidad Rice de Texas, Estados Unidos, dirigió el estudio publicado en la revistaNature Scientific Reports.

“Primero convertimos los componentes de la batería en pintura. Luego pudimos emplearlos para pintar literalmente cualquier superficie, con una simple pistola “, contó Singh.

 

El prototipo Leer más “Crean una batería en aerosol”

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The electric light was a failure.


nytimes.com | http://goo.gl/6wVwA 

Invented by the British chemist Humphry Davyin the early 1800s, it spent nearly 80 years being passed from one initially hopeful researcher to

The incandescent light bulb

another, like some not-quite-housebroken puppy. In 1879, Thomas Edison finally figured out how to make an incandescent light bulb that people would buy. But that didn’t mean the technology immediately became successful. It took another 40 years, into the 1920s, for electric utilities to become stable, profitable businesses.

And even then, success happened only because the utilities created other reasons to consume electricity. They invented the electric toaster and the electric curling iron and found lots of uses for electric motors. They built Coney Island. They installed electric streetcar lines in any place large enough to call itself a town. All of this, these frivolous gadgets and pleasurable diversions, gave us the light bulb.

We tend to rewrite the histories of technological innovation, making myths about a guy who had a great idea that changed the world. In reality, though, innovation isn’t the goal; it’s everything that gets you there. It’s bad financial decisions and blueprints for machines that weren’t built until decades later. It’s the important leaps forward that synthesize lots of ideas, and it’s the belly-up failures that teach us what not to do.

When we ignore how innovation actually works, we make it hard to see what’s happening right in front of us today. If you don’t know that the incandescent light was a failure before it was a success, it’s easy to write off some modern energy innovations — like solar panels — because they haven’t hit the big time fast enough.

Worse, the fairy-tale view of history implies that innovation has an end. It doesn’t. What we want and what we need keeps changing. The incandescent light was a 19th-century failure and a 20th- century success. Now it’s a failure again, edged out by new technologies, like LEDs, that were, themselves, failures for many years.

That’s what this issue is about: all the little failures, trivialities and not-quite-solved mysteries that make the successes possible. This is what innovation looks like. It’s messy, and it’s awesome. Maggie Koerth-Baker

Physicists at Wake Forest University have developed a fabric that doubles as a spare outlet. When used to line your shirt — or even your pillowcase or office chair — it converts subtle differences in temperature across the span of the clothing (say, from your cuff to your armpit) into electricity. And because the different parts of your shirt can vary by about 10 degrees, you could power up your MP3 player just by sitting still. According to the fabric’s creator, David Carroll, a cellphone case lined with the material could boost the phone’s battery charge by 10 to 15 percent over eight hours, using the heat absorbed from your pants pocket. Richard Morgan

Chris Nosenzo
Soon, coffee isn’t going to taste like coffee — at least not the dark, ashy roasts we drink today. Big producers want uniform taste, and a dark roast makes that easy: it evens out flavors and masks flaws. But now the best beans are increasingly being set aside and shipped in vacuum-sealed packs (instead of burlap bags). Improvements like these have allowed roasters to make coffee that tastes like Seville oranges or toasted almonds or berries, and that sense of experimentation is trickling down to the mass market; Starbucks, for instance, now has a Blonde Roast. As quality continues to improve, coffee will lighten, and dark roasts may just become a relic of the past. Oliver Strand
Your spandex can now subtly nag you to work out. A Finnish company, Myontec, recently began marketing underwear embedded with electromyographic sensors that tell you how hard you’re working your quadriceps, hamstring and gluteus muscles. It then sends that data to a computer for analysis. Although the skintight shorts are being marketed to athletes and coaches, they could be useful for the deskbound. The hope, according to Arto Pesola, who is working on an advanced version of the sensors, is that when you see data telling you just how inert you really are, you’ll be inspired to lead a less sedentary life. Gretchen Reynolds

Japoneses con trajes de luz LED bailando increíble coreografia

Un grupo de bailarines japoneses organizó una rutina de baile usando trajes de luces LED, el resultado es más que sorprendente. Al estilo de la película “TRON”, este grupo de bailarines han sorprendido a Internet con esta coreografía.

Actualmente se han producido varios videos de personas usando trajes de luces LED para realizar ciertas actividades como surf, ski, y ahora unos bailarines han hecho un traje especial para bailar en la oscuridad y mostrar diversas figuras con luces LED.

Esta coreografía se utilizó para promocionar el smartphone Xperia NX y Xperia Acro HD en Japón. Los bailarines japoneses vistieron trajes llenos de delgadas luces LED de diversos colores, y en la oscuridad le da un efecto asombroso que parece un antiguo videojuego como el de TRON.


http://www.geekets.com/
Autor: 

Un grupo de bailarines japoneses organizó una rutina de baile usando trajes de luces LED, el resultado es más que sorprendente. Al estilo de la película “TRON”, este grupo de bailarines han sorprendido a Internet con esta coreografía.

Actualmente se han producido varios videos de personas usando trajes de luces LED para realizar ciertas actividades como surf, ski, y ahora unos bailarines han hecho un traje especial para bailar en la oscuridad y mostrar diversas figuras con luces LED.

Esta coreografía se utilizó para promocionar el smartphone Xperia NX y Xperia Acro HD en Japón. Los bailarines japoneses vistieron trajes llenos de delgadas luces LED de diversos colores, y en la oscuridad le da un efecto asombroso que parece un antiguo videojuego como el de TRON.

Video bailarines japoneses usando un traje de luces LED >>> Leer más “Japoneses con trajes de luz LED bailando increíble coreografia”

This Lamp is Controlled by an Android Phone

The french developer of the unnamed project wrote this about the Android controlled lamp of awesome (this is the translation):

The brightness is changed by a vertical scrolling, the saturation by a horizontal scrolling and color varies with the orientation of the phone. The phone used in the video is a HTC Wildfire S Android 2.3.3. The application works with WiFi or mobile network (provided that the lamp is accessible from a public IP address)

The orientation of the phone is detected by the built-in compass (magnetic field sensor 3-axis) parameters hue, saturation and brightness are converted to RGB and then sent via a TCP connection to the Fox board that controls the lamp.


http://thenextweb.com

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The smartphone is now becoming the hub for everything important in our lives. Social connections, payment systems, and banking are all controlled by our phone. Heck, you can even control your thermostat with an iPhone.

While turning your lights on and off with a computer or app might not be a new idea, one guy made something completely awesome and unique using Android. By swiping around on the app, the lamp responds to it. Also, the orientation of your phone dictates the lighting as well. Leer más “This Lamp is Controlled by an Android Phone”