The Bias Against Creatives as Leaders | 99u.com


 

Illustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco

Two candidates are being interviewed for a leadership position in your company. Both have strong resumes, but while one seems to be bursting with new and daring ideas, the other comes across as decidedly less creative (though clearly still a smart cookie). Who gets the job?

The answer, unfortunately, is usually the less creative candidate. This fact may or may not surprise you – you yourself may have been the creative candidate who got the shaft. But what you’re probably wondering is, why?

by Heidi Grant Halvorson

After all, it’s quite clear who should be getting the job. Studies show that leaders who are more creative are in fact better able to effect positive change in their organizations, and are better at inspiring others to follow their lead.

And yet, according to recent research there is good reason to believe that the people with the most creativity aren’t given the opportunity to lead, because of a process that occurs (on a completely unconscious level) in the mind of everyone who has ever evaluated an applicant for a leadership position.

The problem, put simply, is this: our idea of what a prototypical “creative person” is like is completely at odds with our idea of a prototypical “effective leader.”  Leer más “The Bias Against Creatives as Leaders | 99u.com”

A Great Leader’s Year-end Checklist | Inc. |


Inc.com - The Daily Resource for Entrepreneurs

The year is almost over. Great leaders know how to tie up loose ends and make sure their employees are happy and ready to move forward.Salespeople live and die by the annual review. Auditors have built an entire industry around it. For the next month, print and television media will pour out gallons of coverage of the past year in review.

And yet, as leaders, we often move from one year to the next with little or no time spent reviewing the year just past from a purely leadership perspective. To help counter that, here’s my five-point year-end leadership checklist: Leer más “A Great Leader’s Year-end Checklist | Inc. |”

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Retaining Great Employees: It’s Not About the Money


Written by Mansur Hasib

As IT managers and leaders, it is our job to foster the professional growth of everyone who works on our team. If we do not do this we are failing as leaders.

I have had many discussions on the topic of training with both employees and managers. Many IT managers are afraid that certifications will make their employees more marketable and allow them to find better opportunities. Employees are frustrated that their managers do not allow them to grow and so eventually they leave to find better opportunities to learn and to grow professionally.

When I was negotiating my budget as a CIO, I asked for and received $2,000 per year for every employee that could only be used for travel or training. It required the consultation of supervisors and could be used for a conference or even a certification. Since some training is more expensive, employees were allowed to trade and give someone their training dollars for one year so they could get it back from the recipient in a subsequent year. At times I was able to recruit someone simply because I had this guaranteed annual training benefit.

Leer más “Retaining Great Employees: It’s Not About the Money”

To Create an Enduring Vision, Values Must Support Purpose


 Gabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

Values must support your organization’s purpose and desired future. Ask first, “What are our values?” Then ask, “Do our values enable us to fulfill our purpose and our potential?

“Vision is a clearly articulated, results-oriented picture of a future you intend to create. It is a dream with direction.” In short, vision is a combination of three basic elements: 1) a significant purpose, reason for existence, 2) a clear picture of the future, and 3) the underlying core values.

In my last two posts, I discussed the elements of purpose and picture of the future. This post focuses on the third element – values.

Our values are our deeply held beliefs about what is right and good, evoking standards that we care deeply about. They drive our behaviors and decisions, trigger our emotions, and can fuel a passion that drives commitment, even in the face of obstacles and change.

An engaging vision, one that captures our hearts, does so because it clearly resonates with our core values. When a group of people discover they share the same values, there is a significant increase in energy, commitment and trust.

Values must support purpose…   Leer más “To Create an Enduring Vision, Values Must Support Purpose”

The 10 Questions Good Leaders Should I Ask Themselves – Achieve: Vision, Action & Results


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano the name of the game

Good leaders are self-aware, and have thought through the issues and complications of leadership. Here are 10 questions to ask yourself – and to answer:
1. How do you personally define leadership?
Definitions of leadership abound. But if one of your subordinates asked what your definition is, would you have an answer?

2. Who are some of the leaders that you admire and why?
We can learn from other leaders, particularly from their failures. Are there leaders from business, politics, the arts, or sports who you admire, and why? Leer más “The 10 Questions Good Leaders Should I Ask Themselves – Achieve: Vision, Action & Results”

6 Steps to a Perfect Social Media Strategy | vía SiteProNews


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Social Media Strategy

SiteProNews
If you are seeking to increase leads, sales, visibility or all of the above, the first thing you want to do is make sure everything you do online and offline obeys these six principles, that Dr. Robert Cialdini covers in his book Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion.

1. Scarcity: Run limited offers on your Twitter and Facebook pages that provide attractive reasons to register, enroll or buy right away. Offers exclusively for current or past customers can be effective but one adding the element of scarcity is really your secret weapon. Groupon has a countdown that shows you how much time you have left to purchase and it certainly encourages people to buy sooner than later!

2. The Law of Reciprocity Leer más “6 Steps to a Perfect Social Media Strategy | vía SiteProNews”

Successful Leaders Don’t Need to be Present by Stephan De Villiers


http://switchandshift.com

If you’ve not read Stephan’s writings then welcome. For 21st century leaders, the over dependence on managers to make decisions is a bottleneck to progress. Though it may keep change resistant managers happy, it leaves many dissatisfied. Stephan offers up some insights to move away from the staleness inherent in inflated importance. This is part one of two.

If Your People are not Thinking, You are Failing as a Leader

Meet Gary.  He is the leader of a small organization and a very “hands on” guy.  He makes a point of knowing about every single detail in the organization and gets involved in the detail 90% of the time.  He further prides himself in his problem solving abilities. He is the “go to guy” and likes the fact that people look up to him when they have a problem. He gets involved in all the decision making processes in the organization.  In his mind he plays a vital role in solving problems and making important decisions.  Gary is convinced he is a very effective leader and his contribution plays an important role in the success of the organization.

Making People Dependant

The sad truth is Gary is not a very effective leader.  The way he leads people creates a culture of dependence on him as leader in the organization.  This results in people not thinking anymore, becoming lazy to solving problems and losing confidence to make decisions on their own.  Through his behaviour Gary stifles the creative genius of the people he leads.  By not affording them the opportunity to think and come up with solutions to problems and challenges, he has made them dependant.

Gary is not only doing the organization a disservice, but himself as well.  By focussing so much on solving other people’s problems, he neglects development areas in his personal leadership, such as coaching and setting direction.  He spends most of his time involved in problem solving mode, stealing time he could have spent more productively.

Successful Leaders Don’t Need to be Present

Successful leadership means your followers don’t need you around for them to be productive.  They can operate without you.  Once you set the direction, they move on their own accord towards the goal.  This means as leader you can spend your time on motivating, coaching and course correcting.  A successful leader allows people to make their own decisions.  It means they must be able to face problems and come up with solutions, without involving the leader in the process of getting to the solution. To achieve this, people in the organization must think for themselves.

People need to be trained to think. It may sound strange, because doesn’t thinking come rather naturally? The truth is very few people actually learn to think in terms of problem solving. Thinking skills like lateral thinking, thinking out of the box and analytical thinking, unfortunately does not come without training.

As a leader it is your job to help people to develop these skills. At first it will take a lot of effort and will not be easy, especially if your organization has a culture of dependency. It will also take effort from your side, because you will have to trust people to come up with solutions and make the right decisions. You will have to deal with wrong decisions and mistakes as part of the growing pains.

Being available as coach to guide and give advice will become your primary function during this transition. The good news is there is a process you can follow to make it easier to train people in their thinking processes.

The Think Training Process… Leer más “Successful Leaders Don’t Need to be Present by Stephan De Villiers”

15 Critical Business Success Tips after Five Years in Business


Via Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

15 Critical Business Success Tips for Startups and Small Businesses

As we’ve grown CMI, I’ve leaned on many critical resources and keep them pinned to my office wall, such as Mark Fletcher’s 15 Startup Commandments, Dharmesh Shaw’s Startup Triplets, and Fast Company’s 10 Common Mistakes Startups Make. Although it’s hard to clearly identify what the most critical success factors have been during our “road less traveled”, here are the ones that I believe have made the most impact on me, on our company, our amazing employees, and most of all, our valued customers.

Be the Leading Informational Provider for Your Industry – Content marketing works. We have tremendous flexibility in our business model simply because we deliver valuable and compelling industry information to our customers and prospects. Our daily updates, our weekly enewsletters, our quarterly magazine, and our annual research all helps to position us as the go-to resource for content marketing information. Without all this, I cannot imagine how difficult it would be to grow our business, not to mention the sheer cost of sales.
Invest in the Right People – Although our people are some of the leading experts in the entire industry, we hire first based on attitude and flexibility. People with great attitudes who are fun to work with can learn and do just about anything.
Give Employees Permission To Fail – We tell all our employees the following: “Do what you have to do to be successful. Don’t wait for permission. Ask for forgiveness later.” Whether this is a solid policy or not, it helps our employees to take risks and become leaders.
If You Partner, Plan the Exit Strategy First – I cannot express how critical this is. If you partner with anyone, plan that someday the divorce will happen.

…Or Just Don’t Partner – In my experience, most partnerships simply don’t work and hamper the creativity of the organization. Just be careful.
Risk Everything, Everyday – One of our advantages is that we are willing to try anything if we believe in what it can provide for our customers or that we can gain a competitive advantage. We reach decisions quickly, and change these decisions slowly if and when they are changed.
Success Is Impossible without Failure – I saw this statement on Kansas basketball player Thomas Robinson’s arm (tattoo) and I couldn’t agree more. There were moments when I didn’t believe the business was going to make it. Looking back, it was those moments that have defined our organization. I’m no longer afraid of failure, but keenly aware of what new opportunities arise because of it.
Don’t Fall in Love with Your Product or Service – This almost cost us the entire business. Although our content marketing matching service, Junta42, was working and profitable, we weren’t growing the business at a rate that was acceptable. But Junta42 was my baby and, although I knew it needed to evolve, it took everything I had to pivot the business in a new direction. Discarding the product we began the business with was the best business decision, and hardest one, I ever made.

Get a Good Attorney and Accountant – Never do any of this yourself… let’s take a look! Leer más “15 Critical Business Success Tips after Five Years in Business”

The Difference Between Building Authority and Talking About Yourself

Your content actually demonstrates your expertise, compared with a website or bio page that claimsexpertise. This is a crucial distinction, because it truly levels the playing field and allows anyone to come along and build authority that outpaces even recognized and credentialed experts in a particular niche or field.”

The truth about authority perception by humans or machines is what people say about you is much more important than what you say about yourself!

How do you get people talking? Have a point of view and let people know through content you publish on and off of your webiste. Use a blog, articles, guest blogging, commenting, videos, podcasts…the list is endless.

The key is creating content now. Imagine, you have been working your entire adult life building your business and developing a great reputation. Then, some upstart comes into your market and starts publishing content, doing webinars, and suddenly, they are the perceived expert in your niche. Not fun…

We will have a webinar on this shortly….stay tuned.


http://www.stumbleupon.com

131360868_56d0ebaa67

I recently read a great report called Authority Rules by Brian Clark, the founder of Copyblogger. It’s a well written easy to read piece that outlines 10 rules to building authority for your business and persona.

Building authority in the new distributed web is critical to the success of your Internet marketing efforts. Let’s look at the definition of authority for a minute to better understand why:

au-thor-i-ty noun: [1] A citation (e.g. from a book) used in defense or support; [2] the source from which the citation is drawn; [3] and individual cited or appealed to as an expert.

On the web, the way Google and other search engines see authority is through links from other sites to your site. How influential are those other sites and how many of them link to your site also play a big part in your perceived authority by search engines. So this concept of building authority is very important because while you build authority on the web, other sites will be linking to your site and your business will win search engine rankings (SEO). It becomes self perpetuating…very cool if you can do it. Leer más “The Difference Between Building Authority and Talking About Yourself”

The 10 Traits of Outstanding Leadership

This article is for parents, teachers, counselors, small business owners, managers, or anyone else who interacts with others and has some influence over them. If this is you – then you are a leader.

Having influence over people isn’t just about being in a formal position of authority. This is part of it, but influence works both ways: kids have influence over their parents, students over their teachers and spouses over each other.

What is meant by ‘leader’? Ask a hundred people and you’ll probably get a hundred different answers, although many of them will be able coercion or manipulation, since this is the experience many people have had with those in formal leadership roles. A parent may try to force a child to tidy his room; a team leader might try to push a member of his team to make more sales. But to manipulate and coerce is to misunderstand what leadership is about and, in the end, is counterproductive. The reality is that people cannot be coerced. In his book, Choice Theory, William Glasser makes the compelling case that, even in the most extreme situations, people cannot be forced into things, and that, even when coercive tactics appear to work, they do not produce the best or sustainable results. People might comply to some extent, but they will never be putting their heart into the task so long as they feel forced.

The real, and often misunderstood, job of a leader is simply this – to put people in a position to thrive. When people thrive – when they have a clear sense of purpose and are successful – they are using all their energy, achieving more and contributing fully. So how does a leader do this? Here are ten behaviors of outstanding leaders. See how you measure up.


Written by Mark Harrison | http://www.pickthebrain.com

This article is for parents, teachers, counselors, small business owners, managers, or anyone else who interacts with others and has some influence over them. If this is you – then you are a leader.

Having influence over people isn’t just about being in a formal position of authority. This is part of it, but influence works both ways: kids have influence over their parents, students over their teachers and spouses over each other.

What is meant by ‘leader’? Ask a hundred people and you’ll probably get a hundred different answers, although many of them will be able coercion or manipulation, since this is the experience many people have had with those in formal leadership roles. A parent may try to force a child to tidy his room; a team leader might try to push a member of his team to make more sales. But to manipulate and coerce is to misunderstand what leadership is about and, in the end, is counterproductive. The reality is that people cannot be coerced. In his book, Choice Theory, William Glasser makes the compelling case that, even in the most extreme situations, people cannot be forced into things, and that, even when coercive tactics appear to work, they do not produce the best or sustainable results. People might comply to some extent, but they will never be putting their heart into the task so long as they feel forced.

The real, and often misunderstood, job of a leader is simply this – to put people in a position to thrive. When people thrive – when they have a clear sense of purpose and are successful – they are using all their energy, achieving more and contributing fully. So how does a leader do this? Here are ten behaviors of outstanding leaders. See how you measure up. Leer más “The 10 Traits of Outstanding Leadership”

Leadership and management

The approaches that we do, to meet the challenges inherent in organizational culture, when we turn to outside, to open innovation put some leadership questions.

Executives on strategic functions when they want to embrace open innovation can face the future with lack of security. But managing the tension between control and collaboration between technical contributions and management can resolve personal and organizational conflicts.

This leadership, i.e. the members of the organization which plays such a role, in addition to establish the direction that developers should follow must ensure that the resources meet the needs of planned activities.


The five dimensions of Meta-leadership as deve...

Thnxs to   abaldaia.wordpress.com | Intuinovare

The approaches that we do, to meet the challenges inherent in organizational culture, when we turn to outside, to open innovation put some leadership questions.

Executives on strategic functions when they want to embrace open innovation can face the future with lack of security. But managing the tension between control and collaboration between technical contributions and management can resolve personal and organizational conflicts.

This leadership, i.e. the members of the organization which plays such a role, in addition to establish the direction that developers should follow must ensure that the resources meet the needs of planned activities. Leer más “Leadership and management”

Challenging Our People

One of Leadership’s core responsibilities is to address issues and challenges within the business. But what if we flipped that model and gave part of that responsibility to our employees? People are our greatest asset as we hire the best and brightest to join us in delivering the highest quality professional services, so involving them in addressing challenges is imperative. Now with the power of new technologies, the discussion that once took place in a conference room can be opened to everyone across the globe for their ideas and thoughts. As such, we found a way to tap into the knowledge and expertise of our people and challenge them to help solve the business challenges facing us.

Innovation challenges are time bound initiatives to challenge our people to share their ideas in response to a particular business issue. Business sponsors are responsible for championing the challenge by setting the challenge question and assembling teams of people in place to respond, evaluate, and bring ideas forward toward implementation. These individuals are members of leadership who are empowered to create organization change and have an extensive network to make it happen. A challenge may run anywhere from two to three weeks focused on soliciting as many ideas as possible.


by Michele McConomy | Innovation Office, PwC
http://pwcinnovate.wordpress.com/

One of Leadership’s core responsibilities is to address issues and challenges within the business.  But what if we flipped that model and gave part of that responsibility to our employees?  People are our greatest asset as we hire the best and brightest to join us in delivering the highest quality professional services, so involving them in addressing challenges is imperative.  Now with the power of new technologies, the discussion that once took place in a conference room can be opened to everyone across the globe for their ideas and thoughts.  As such, we found a way to tap into the knowledge and expertise of our people and challenge them to help solve the business challenges facing us.

Innovation challenges are time bound initiatives to challenge our people to share their ideas in response to a particular business issue.  Business sponsors are responsible for championing the challenge by setting the challenge question and assembling teams of people in place to respond, evaluate, and bring ideas forward toward implementation.   These individuals are members of leadership who are empowered to create organization change and have an extensive network to make it happen.  A challenge may run anywhere from two to three weeks focused on soliciting as many ideas as possible. Leer más “Challenging Our People”

Recognition: How the revolution IS being tweeted | [Abstract]

A little recognition goes a long way

That tiny sliver of recognition gave me the impetus to start looking into something I suspected at first was absurd, and it ended up changing my life. Without it, I might have gone on pursuing my career as a rational manager, continuing to do what everyone else was doing. I might have gone on thinking that storytelling was an interesting and clever trick, but nothing serious.

Einstein said, insightfully, “If at first an idea isn’t absurd, there is no hope for it.” Any really good, big new idea at first is going to seem absurd to the person who has stumbled on it. It takes courage to set aside conventional wisdom, to abandon what everyone knows to be true, and start pursuing a path that you and everyone else think is absurd. And yet a little recognition—even a sliver—can be the nudge that does the trick. Recognition can be the element that makes the difference between major innovation and passively going along with the flow.

What’s interesting is to note how slight the nudge of recognition was. It wasn’t a big fanfare or a public accolade. It was a quiet, private one-minute conversation with someone I had never met. True, it came from someone in an organization I viewed with respect. The conversation was merely a hint that I had stumbled on something that other people thought interesting, something worth looking into. And yet that slight nudge propelled me into action and changed my life, and ultimately, in a modest way, the entire world: unlike ten years ago, leadership storytelling is now a generally accepted part of the essential skills of a leader.

Why Malcolm Gladwell Got It Wrong

I am the biggest fan of Malcolm Gladwell’s writing. But his recent article in the New Yorker, “Small Change: Why the revolution will not be tweeted” seriously underestimates the impact of even weak recognition. It was great news that he highlighted a wonderful book like The Dragonfly Effect by Jennifer Aaker and Andy Smith, but sad that he got it all so wrong.

First mistake: His argument is that the platforms of social media are built around weak ties. Twitter and Facebook connect people who may have never met.

The Internet lets us exploit the power of these kinds of distant connections with marvellous efficiency. It’s terrific at the diffusion of innovation, interdisciplinary collaboration, seamlessly matching up buyers and sellers, and the logistical functions of the dating world. But weak ties seldom lead to high-risk activism.

This is where Gladwell makes his first mistake: “Weak ties seldom lead to high-risk activism.”

What he misses is that the difference between acting and not-acting is very slim.

Often people have ideas, have passion. All they may need is a little nudge to push them into action.

Second mistake: Gladwell correctly recognizes the weaknesses of networks:

Because networks don’t have a centralized leadership structure and clear lines of authority, they have real difficulty reaching consensus and setting goals. They can’t think strategically; they are chronically prone to conflict and error. How do you make difficult choices about tactics or strategy or philosophical direction when everyone has an equal say?

But what Gladwell misses is that networks can give individual leaders the confidence that comes from knowing that they are not alone. Their ideas may sound absurd, at first glance, but they are not crazy. They may give the innovative person the little nudge that they need to move into action.

Third mistake: Gladwell imputes views to “the evangelists of social media” that no sensible person ever held:

The evangelists of social media don’t understand this distinction; they seem to believe that a Facebook friend is the same as a real friend and that signing up for a donor registry in Silicon Valley today is activism in the same sense as sitting at a segregated lunch counter in Greensboro in 1960.

No sensible person ever equated friends on Facebook with real friends in person. This is straw man argumentation at its worst.

Fourth mistake: These poor enthusiasts of social media, he writes, just don’t understand:

Some of this grandiosity is to be expected. Innovators tend to be solipsists. They often want to cram every stray fact and experience into their new model.

The same objection has been made to every human invention since the wheel. “Everything is now different!” Well, yes. A certain amount of grandiosity is to be expected. And warranted. In fact, it’s the very grandiosity that we find in Gladwell’s own writing about innovation in The Tipping Point and all his other articles and books. Innovation does warrant some grandiosity.


(…)
Full article:
http://stevedenning.typepad.com/steve_denning/2010/10/recognition-how-the-revolution-is-being-tweeted.html

A little recognition goes a long way

That tiny sliver of recognition gave me the impetus to start looking into something I suspected at first was absurd, and it ended up changing my life. Without it, I might have gone on pursuing my career as a rational manager, continuing to do what everyone else was doing. I might have gone on thinking that storytelling was an interesting and clever trick, but nothing serious.

Einstein said, insightfully, “If at first an idea isn’t absurd, there is no hope for it.” Any really good, big new idea at first is going to seem absurd to the person who has stumbled on it. It takes courage to set aside conventional wisdom, to abandon what everyone knows to be true, and start pursuing a path that you and everyone else think is absurd. And yet a little recognition—even a sliver—can be the nudge that does the trick. Recognition can be the element that makes the difference between major innovation and passively going along with the flow.

What’s interesting is to note how slight the nudge of recognition was. It wasn’t a big fanfare or a public accolade. It was a quiet, private one-minute conversation with someone I had never met. True, it came from someone in an organization I viewed with respect. The conversation was merely a hint that I had stumbled on something that other people thought interesting, something worth looking into. And yet that slight nudge propelled me into action and changed my life, and ultimately, in a modest way, the entire world: unlike ten years ago, leadership storytelling is now a generally accepted part of the essential skills of a leader. Leer más “Recognition: How the revolution IS being tweeted | [Abstract]”

Blogging Innovation » What is an Innovation Culture?


by Roy Luebke

What is an Innovation Culture?Much has been written about what constitutes an innovation culture. Defining what that means may seem relatively simple, but is much more difficult to both define and achieve than one might think.

To begin the definition for an individual organization, start by understanding how the senior management team deals with ambiguity and risk. If an organization is extremely risk averse, it is unlikely to be very innovative. All companies deal with risk, there is risk in doing something, and there is risk in doing nothing. Risk is a part of being in business, and how the organization is prepared to manage risk is a leading factor in its ability to move into new competitive arenas.

The need to be innovative is derived from market pressures. The leadership team must feel a degree of angst about the future, or some paranoia about outside forces that makes them uncomfortable. Innovation is driven by the belief that a firm’s competitive advantage is fleeting and that it must always be reinventing itself in order to survive. Hubris is anathema to innovation.

An innovation culture requires advances in processes for discovery, experimentation, and developing portfolios of options. These new processes will, in fact help mitigate risk exposure as opportunities and solutions are better defined. Better definitions will reduce ambiguity and uncertainty.

Organizations require new process to research their customers and discover new patterns in customer attitudes, and market and technology evolutions. Firms need to create ways to recognize new, emerging patterns in key areas and develop new business concepts to meet these new realities. Business leaders need to allow their people to experiment more and develop prototypes that fail before going to market so that new innovations are more likely to succeed in the long term. Ultimately, new processes need to be developed to create deeper understanding about customers and deliver more of what customers want, even though customers are not likely to articulate these needs precisely.

Full article:
Blogging Innovation » What is an Innovation Culture?
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