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Want To Make A Lot Of Money As A CEO? Fire People

The 50 top CEO layoff leaders received $12 million on average in 2009, compared to the S&P 500 average of $8.5 million. Each of the corporations surveyed laid off at least 3,000 workers between November 2008 and April 2010. Seventy-two percent of the firms announced mass layoffs at a time of positive earnings reports.

At a time when we should be pulling together to strengthen our shared economic futures, CEOs should not be rewarded for slashing jobs,” says IPS Senior Scholar Chuck Collins. “Realigning the interests of CEOs with their employees and the rest of our country would be good for the economy and national morale.”

It’s disturbing that down-sizing CEOs have earned more recently, but it would be extremely disturbing if the government could control companies behavior in this regard.


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CEOs who fire people tend to make more money. That’s been the trend recently, according to ‘CEO Pay and The Great Recession’ from the Institute for Policy Studies.

IPS:

The 50 top CEO layoff leaders received $12 million on average in 2009, compared to the S&P 500 average of $8.5 million. Each of the corporations surveyed laid off at least 3,000 workers between November 2008 and April 2010. Seventy-two percent of the firms announced mass layoffs at a time of positive earnings reports.

At a time when we should be pulling together to strengthen our shared economic futures, CEOs should not be rewarded for slashing jobs,” says IPS Senior Scholar Chuck Collins. “Realigning the interests of CEOs with their employees and the rest of our country would be good for the economy and national morale.” Leer más “Want To Make A Lot Of Money As A CEO? Fire People”

Why Small Business Job Cuts Hurt More Than Big-Employer Layoffs

Troubling statistics have been rolling in lately about job losses. While the beginning of the recession saw the shedding of thousands of jobs en masse at major corporations, by the end of last year, job cuts were concentrated at small businesses. While financial aid aimed at small businesses continues to sit in the Senate, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported 62 percent of cuts were at firms with less than 50 workers — the kind that provide nearly one-third of all jobs.
And those cuts hurt that business, and the economy, in ways big-company layoffs never will.
Small businesses will often cut to the bone before laying off longtime workers. Some have done furloughs, voluntary sabbaticals, pay cuts, deferred maintenance, marketing reductions — anything but pink-slipping workers. For many entrepreneurs with small staffs, those people have become like family.


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Troubling statistics have been rolling in lately about job losses. While the beginning of the recession saw the shedding of thousands of jobs en masse at major corporations, by the end of last year, job cuts were concentrated at small businesses. While financial aid aimed at small businesses continues to sit in the Senate, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported 62 percent of cuts were at firms with less than 50 workers — the kind that provide nearly one-third of all jobs.

And those cuts hurt that business, and the economy, in ways big-company layoffs never will.

Small businesses will often cut to the bone before laying off longtime workers. Some have done furloughs, voluntary sabbaticals, pay cuts, deferred maintenance, marketing reductions — anything but pink-slipping workers. For many entrepreneurs with small staffs, those people have become like family.  Leer más “Why Small Business Job Cuts Hurt More Than Big-Employer Layoffs”

Do Job Hoppers Really Make the Best Employees? Penelope Trunk Thinks So.

In the 20th century one thing you didn’t want was a reputation as a job hopper. But in the 21st century? Penelope Trunk says it’s a different story. In a blog called Why Job Hoppers Make the Best Employees, she points to the statistics that tell us that people in their 20s change jobs approximately every 18 months. And people in their 30s change jobs frequently as well, although at a slower pace than the Gen-Yers. [Más…]

But let’s reframe this old issue. Job hoppers are not quitters, nor are they merely opportunists. Penelope argues that job-hoppers make better employees and are generally more satisfied with their work life. So if you think job-hopping is bad stuff, change your thinking.


In the 20th century one thing you didn’t want was a reputation as a job hopper.  But in the 21st centuryPenelope Trunk says it’s a different story.  In a blog called Why Job Hoppers Make the Best Employees, she points to the statistics that tell  us that people in their 20s change jobs approximately every 18 months.  And people in their 30s change jobs frequently as well, although at a slower pace than the Gen-Yers. Leer más “Do Job Hoppers Really Make the Best Employees? Penelope Trunk Thinks So.”