When Bieber tops the list, is influence dead?

I’ve written a bit about influence online and it’s an area that really fascinates me. But when social media service Klout currently have Justin Bieber at the top of their top 20 list for influence, you have to wonder if this is pretty spot on, or if it actually means that influence is dead? I’m inclined to think, unfortunately, that influence is dead. That’s not to say that I don’t recognise the huge popularity that Bieber has online, but can you really classify him as more influential than Barack Obama? They shouldn’t really even be in the same list.

The first problem is how you define influence. Is it the power to make a ruling over one of the most powerful countries in the world (Obama) or the ability to encourage thousands of retweets of one your random thoughts (Bieber). If influence is to mean anything as social media progresses, then we need to seriously redefine the meaning. The problem doesn’t lie with Klout, who have developed one of the most sophisticated systems for determining influence, but rather in how we interpret influence and what it means today.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/liquidsunshine49/5146648169/I’ve written a bit about influence online and it’s an area that really fascinates me. But when social media service Klout currently have Justin Bieber at the top of their top 20 list for influence, you have to wonder if this is pretty spot on, or if it actually means that influence is dead? I’m inclined to think, unfortunately, that influence is dead. That’s not to say that I don’t recognise the huge popularity that Bieber has online, but can you really classify him as more influential than Barack Obama? They shouldn’t really even be in the same list.

The first problem is how you define influence. Is it the power to make a ruling over one of the most powerful countries in the world (Obama) or the ability to encourage thousands of retweets of one your random thoughts (Bieber). If influence is to mean anything as social media progresses, then we need to seriously redefine the meaning. The problem doesn’t lie with Klout, who have developed one of the most sophisticated systems for determining influence, but rather in how we interpret influence and what it means today. Leer más “When Bieber tops the list, is influence dead?”

NIKE / NIKE+ GPS

For those of you still unfamiliar with Nike’s slight awesome piece of digital running utility, here’s a quick recap…

In 2006 the brand partnered with Apple to launch the groundbreaking Nike+ service. This uses a small accelerometer placed in the user’s shoe, which communicates either with a special wristband, or directly with an iPod Nano, Touch or iPhone. Data around the distance and pace of each run can then be transferred and shared online with the rest of the Nike+ community.

The new app, however, makes use of the GPS capability on the more recent iPhones and iPod Touch. This means that not only can the user ditch the separate accelerometer, but in doing so, gain access to a whole new geo-specific dataset. Here’s how it works…


After downloading the £1.19 app and heading out for a run, the user can track (via Google Maps) the exact route they are taking – including a breakdown of pace and distance at different points in the workout. If there is no GPS signal available, or they are simply working the treadmill, the app will default to the original accelerometer measurement, still relaying data on time, distance, pace, calories burned etc.
Nike builds on the success of its groundbreaking Nike+ application with GPS functionality as well as a host of other goodies Leer más “NIKE / NIKE+ GPS”

Nissan Leaf Falls on the Side of ‘Innovation’

Earlier this year, when Toyota was facing its PR disaster over recalls of faulty anti-lock brakes and accelerator pedals, Rob Schwartz said Nissan looked at the situation and asked, “Why do we have to be No. 3?”

Nissan, which Schwartz dubbed an “alternative” Japanese brand that formerly stood for performance and design, is attempting to change that with a big boost in ad spending and a new campaign built around the theme, “Innovation for all.”

Schwartz, chief creative officer at TBWA\Chiat\Day, said the Toyota episode “opened our minds” to the fact that an opportunity existed. The strategy, outlined in the agency’s new campaign, is to own “innovation” in the auto category by using Leaf, the brand’s electric car, as a halo.

The “Innovation for all campaign” soft launched in July with a TV spot featuring Lance Armstrong bemoaning all the tailpipes he’s followed over the past 20 years of biking. Then Armstrong lauds the Leaf, which he notes is “100 percent electric, no tailpipe.”

Nissan is breaking five more spots echoing the theme, including one called “Innovations” that celebrates new technologies the brand is introducing, like smart phone apps and the use of recycled materials in the cars. On Sept. 9, the brand plans to introduce “Polar Bear,” which takes on global warming by showing the threatened species hugging a consumer who bought the Leaf.

Jon Brancheau, vp, marketing at Nissan North America, said the Leaf is meant to be the “poster child of innovation” for the brand. Brancheau acknowledged that the model, which goes on sale in December at $32,780 (not including a $7,500 federal tax credit), is not for everyone. He said communication at the dealer level will stress that the model only gets about 100 miles per charge, so it wouldn’t be ideal for long trips.


– Todd Wasserman
Earlier this year, when Toyota was facing its PR disaster over recalls of faulty anti-lock brakes and accelerator pedals, Rob Schwartz said Nissan looked at the situation and asked, “Why do we have to be No. 3?”

Nissan, which Schwartz dubbed an “alternative” Japanese brand that formerly stood for performance and design, is attempting to change that with a big boost in ad spending and a new campaign built around the theme, “Innovation for all.”

Schwartz, chief creative officer at TBWA\Chiat\Day, said the Toyota episode “opened our minds” to the fact that an opportunity existed. The strategy, outlined in the agency’s new campaign, is to own “innovation” in the auto category by using Leaf, the brand’s electric car, as a halo.

The “Innovation for all campaign” soft launched in July with a TV spot featuring Lance Armstrong bemoaning all the tailpipes he’s followed over the past 20 years of biking. Then Armstrong lauds the Leaf, which he notes is “100 percent electric, no tailpipe.”

Nissan is breaking five more spots echoing the theme, including one called “Innovations” that celebrates new technologies the brand is introducing, like smart phone apps and the use of recycled materials in the cars. On Sept. 9, the brand plans to introduce “Polar Bear,” which takes on global warming by showing the threatened species hugging a consumer who bought the Leaf.

Jon Brancheau, vp, marketing at Nissan North America, said the Leaf is meant to be the “poster child of innovation” for the brand. Brancheau acknowledged that the model, which goes on sale in December at $32,780 (not including a $7,500 federal tax credit), is not for everyone. He said communication at the dealer level will stress that the model only gets about 100 miles per charge, so it wouldn’t be ideal for long trips. Leer más “Nissan Leaf Falls on the Side of ‘Innovation’”

How Nike’s CEO Shook Up the Shoe Industry

Nike’s Mark Parker brings together extreme talents, whether they’re basketball stars, tattooists, or designers obsessed with shoes.

“It still has moon-dust on it.”
Mark Parker sounds like a happy kid as he points to an astronaut manual from the Apollo mission inside his glass-topped desk at Nike’s Beaverton, Oregon, headquarters. Over his shoulder, Keith Richards, at least the version of the Rolling Stones guitarist by German artist Sebastian Krüger, feigns a boozy disinterest. “And here,” says Parker, swinging around in his chair, “is Jimi Hendrix’s guitar.”


By: Ellen McGirt

Photograph by Patrik Giardino

Mark Parker, CEO, Nike

Nike’s Mark Parker brings together extreme talents, whether they’re basketball stars, tattooists, or designers obsessed with shoes.

“It still has moon-dust on it.”
Mark Parker sounds like a happy kid as he points to an astronaut manual from the Apollo mission inside his glass-topped desk at Nike’s Beaverton, Oregon, headquarters. Over his shoulder, Keith Richards, at least the version of the Rolling Stones guitarist by German artist Sebastian Krüger, feigns a boozy disinterest. “And here,” says Parker, swinging around in his chair, “is Jimi Hendrix‘s guitar.” Leer más “How Nike’s CEO Shook Up the Shoe Industry”